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LIBRARY 



OF THE 




MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL 

COLLEGE 



NO. DATE 
SOURCE 



. 



This book may be kept out 

TWO WE E K S 

only, and is subject to a fine ot TWO 
CENTS a day thereafter. It will be due on 
the day indicated below 

OCT 2 y 1909 

MAN " 



'■ 




DEC 16 Mb 



£j£. 



'. y<r( <« 



77 



'7 



S 



fflE COLLEGE SI&5AI 



VOL. 18 



NO. 1 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS., OCTOBER 2, 1907 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




QVA*W*'m r . We handle only 

Be sure of the quality. Buy clothes you can dep» nd , *V£ w thc mftkcr 
8 uch clothes as we can fully guarantee, and we 

guarantees to ub. . f anvt hine goes wrong with 

Wouldn't it be a comfort to you, to know tha anyt g g g ^ mQTe 
the clothes you buy that we are G I A, *, make 1 1 n g 
about the Clothes we sell. Spring Styles, *l- w » NO RTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Dress Suits to rent. 



NEXT TO POST OFFICE. 






RED DWARF 
INK PENCIL 



AT 

DEUEL'S 

DRUGSTORE 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 
Is Eeady tor instant Use, 
without any adjustment. 

Is extremely portahle.and 
may be carried In any posi- 
tion without fear of leakage 
llol.ls a large supply pt 
ink. which Is preserved In 
excellent condition for an 
Indefinite period. 

All the parts are composed 
of materials entirely un- 
acted upon by the acid of 
any Ink. 

WARRANTED A PERFECT 
WRITING FLUID PENCIL 
In Polished Bed Vulcanite 
with Needle, Spring, and 
Nnzzle.madeol the precious 
Metals, and large Reservoir 
tor Ink. 

SOME HINTS. 
1. Use Always Fresh, Clean 
Ink to Fill— Ink Pencil 
preferred . 

2 Avoid air bubbles In flll- 
" lng ; they prevent the ink 

flowing to the point. 

3 Take off the point cover 
with a Screwing Motion. 
It prevents suction. 

4. Keep the alr-hoie In 
shank of Ink Pencil alway s 
clean. No air, no flow of 
ink. 

5. Should the Screw-Joint 
tret locked , w rap an elastic 
band round thc roughened 
joint to unscrew. Don t 
use pliers. 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 
VIOIilH, BAHJO, tWDOlilH, GUITRH STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



The Elite Shoe, W. L. Douglas Shoe, 
The J. & M. Shoe 



Chase" Varsity Shoe, $5 to $0, 
"Knickerbocker" Varsity Shoe, $5 to $8, 

"Elite" Shoe, Tempting to the eye, $3.50 to $5. 
W. L. Douglas Shoes, $3 and $3.50, 

Whitman & Keith Shoes, $3.50 and $4. 



PAGE'S "STORE. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR COLLEGE MEN 

It's your own fault if you don't get your money'B 
worth here. We right every wrong. 

TiVME^ J?*. PAGE, 

Next to Post Office. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Costs but $i per $100 worth for three years in 
any college building, Policies issued while you wait. 



REPAIRING. 

Done by Power Machines and Finished Like New Work. 



W. R- BROWN 



Savings Bank Block, 



AMHERST 






30238 



. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOODS FOR MEN 




C. & K. DERBY, (Quality De Luxe) 

REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 




ENGLISH m SCOTCH WOOLENS, 

Confined Styles. Imported Direct from London. 




TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVI II. 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 2. 1907 



NO. 1 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should be addressed. Collsgk Signal. Amhbmt. Mass. The Siomal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908, Business Manager. 

O. B. BR1CCS, 1909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. O. B. BRICGS. 1909. Alumni Notes. 

J. R. PARKER. 1908. Athletics. 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908, College Notes. W. E. ADAMS. 1909, Seminars. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. E. F. DAMON, 1910. 

W. R. CLARK. 1910. 



Terms i $1.00 per near in adcance. Single Copies, IOc. Postags outside ol United States and Canada, -Be. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Y. M. C. A. 

Foot-Ball Association. 
College Senate. 
Readir.g-Room Association, 
Basket-ball Association, 



C. H. White. Pres. 
K. E. Cillett. Manager. 
F. C. Peters. Pres. 
J.N. Summers, Sec. 
E. D. Philbrick. Manager. 



Athletic Association. 

Base- Ball Association. 

Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 

Fraternity Conference. 

Musical Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
R. D. Lul'. Manager. 

F. C. Peters. Pres. 

G. H Chapman. Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edrtbri&ls. 



The editor has a request to make : that his numer- 
ous and well meaning friends who occasionally borrow 
the The Republican which comes in his name will 
kindly take care to return it to the Sicnal mail-box. 
The editor can't always 6e there when the mail-man 
comes to protect his own interests. 



As is customary at this time of the year, the 
editor will launch his first bit of editorial comment 
at the members of the entering class. You will find 
the college life new ; exhilarating, depressing, joyful, 
bitter, just as you matiniain your attitude. You will 
discover that Massachusetts Agricultural College is 
democratic through and through. It will not take 
you long to find out that here nobody stands on "the 
governor's" reputation or money, but that each and 
every one is valued for what he is doing here and 
now, for himself and for the college. It is a ques- 
tion of doing. Don't join that certain class of nonenti- 



ties who advance neither themselves nor the interests 
which demand their support. As Elbert Hubbard 
puts it "You better be an an Is- Now than a Has-Was- 
ser; and as for a Not- Yet-But-Soon, why he Is 
always one." Your first duty Is to yourself, and after 
that duty is performed, give just a little more time 
than you have left to your college, the college of 
which you have become a part, and which justly has 
a demand upon you. The record of the past and the 
record of the present is that those who sacrifice most 
for the college get the most out of it. And why? 
Because they are learning what is far superior to 
mere book and tecnical knowledge, — to give them- 
selves for a purpose. They are the kind of men who 
can adapt themselves to the problem in hand, — the 
kind of men which other men are looking for. Give 
yourself to the capacity of your abilities ; nobody can 
give more. And when I say give yourself to the col- 
lege, I do not narrowly restrict my meaning to athlet- 
ics or what we all call "student activities". I mean 
get in sympathy with the college life, the work the 
college is doing, the courses, the instruction, and, as 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



a good part of the college life, with student activities, 
such as you can and may support. Get the college 
spirit. Have some ambition as to what you expect to 
get out of a course at M. A. C, and then work for 
It. Your ambition may give place to better and 
broader ambitions, but always keep something ahead 
to sight upon. The man who doesn't know what he 
is here for, even in an indefinite way, is getting no good 
out of the college course. He is an indeterminate quan- 
tity rapidly approaching zero, and will wake up some 
day to find himself out of the race. The college 
presents plenty of good opportunities for the good 
men. If you don't see them, you can make up your 
mind that the trouble lies not with the college, but 
close at home. Above all be happy. Take the 
vigorous, healthy, man-of-actlon point of view of life 
as you find it in the college circle. Make each day 
a conquest, of yourself, and the problems you have 
to meet. It is today, not yesterday or tomorrow. 
So endeth the editor's little preachment to freshmen. 
But it is not a preachment. It is merely a practical, 
business-like analysis of the consensus of college 
opinion, devoid of any theological hedges or frills. 
We are still a small college, and each one of us pos- 
sesses something that the college needs. Our duty— 
and It is a pleasant duty— is to give. 



/Uhlefic N<>*«- 






FOOTBALL. 

With a veteran team, good new material for sub- 
stitutes, a competent coach, a well arranged schedule, 
and lots of enthusiasm in the student body, every- 
thing seems to angur well for a most successful foot- 
ball season. Manager Gillett called the men back 
for the first practice on Monday, Sept. 16. Coach 
Bulluck came the same day and began at once in 
drilling the squad in the rudiments of the game. 
Only one or two freshmen were out for practice before 
college opened but it was then thought that there 
would be a wealth of good material as soon as the 
new men were through their examinations, registra- 
tion, etc. The freshman class has been disappoint- 
ing in this respect, however, for only a few of the 
class are out on the squad and those who are out are 
by no means the biggest men. The little fellows 



seem to make up in spirit what they lack in size but 
it would look better for the class if it would turn out 
some men with both size and spirit. Owing to this 
lack of first class new material the team so far has 
been made up entirely of old men. Paige has his 
old position at center. Anderson and Willis are play- 
ing the two guards, the latter being transferred to that 
position from the backfield where he played last year. 
Faerly and Sexton, last year's tackles, are playing 
the same positions again this year. Crosby is out for 
tackle, however, and at his present gait will make 
things lively for the old men. Turner and Crossman 
are playing the end positions with Barry as first sub- 
stitute. Captain Cobb is running the team from his 
old position at quarterback. Philbrick, Schermer- 
horn, and Warner are playing the backfield positions. 
New men trying for the team are Roberts, Sharpe, 
Davey, Whittaker, Coash and Robinson. The squad 
is composed of the following men: 1908, Cobb, 
Anderson, Barry, Philbrick, and Farley; 1909, 
Willis, Warner, Turner, Crossman, Sexton, Crosby 
andO'Donnell ; 1910Schermerhorn,Blaney,Leornard, 
McGraw. Brown, Urban and Prouty ; 1911, Whit- 
taker, Roberts, Sharpe, Robinson, Coash and Davey. 
Manager Gillett has arranged the following 

schedule : 

Sept. 28— Williams at Willamstown. 

Oct. 2 — Brown at Providence. 

Oct. 5 — R. I. State on campus. 

Oct. 12 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 

Oct. 19 — Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Oct. 26— Worcester P. I. on cumpus. 

Nov. 2 — Amherst at Amherst. 

N 0V- 9— Tufts at Medford. 

Nov. 16— Springfield Training School at Spnngfeld 
This is one of the best arranged schedules that any 

manager has given the college in years. Tne hard 

games do not come twice a week as they oft^n have 

in other years and it has been so arranged that the 

team will be in the very best of shape for the Amherst 
game on November 2. 

Williams, 5; M, A. C. 4. 
The first game of the season was played last 
Saturday at Williamstown While Williams won by 
the narrow margin of one point, yet our team played 
magnificent football and gave promise of being the 
best team the college has had in some years 



The game began by Cobb kicking off to Williams. 
For a few minutes the Williams offense was a mys- 
tery to our men and the ball was worked up the field 
for a considerable distance. This was accomplished 
by a series of shifts from one side of the line to the 
other. The entire Williams line with the exception 
of the center would stand a few feet back from the 
line in an erect position, the quarterback would stand 
with his back to the center, rattle off the signals and 
the men would then rush to their different positions 
just as the ball was passed. M. A. C. soon held for 
downs and then worked the ball within striking dis- 
tance of Williams' goal. Captain Cobb then dropped 
back for a field goal, sending the ball directly between 
the uprights. 

On the next kick-off Williams brought the ball in to 
their thirty yard line. Robb then got away on a 
trick play and was not stopped until he had reached 
his opponents ten yard line. Williams had to work 
hard to get the ball over the line, having two yards 
to go on the third down. Robb was finally sent over 
for the only touchdown of the game. 

In the second half there was no scoring. The 
ball was worked back and forward, the distance gained 
by each team being practically the same. In this 
half Williams gained considerable ground by using 
the onside kick. M. A. C. didn't use the forward 
pass or onside kick during the game but instead 
played straight football depending mainly on Captain 
Cobb who gained nearly twenty yards on every 
exchange of punts. His kicking was easily the feat- 
ure of the contest. 

The lineup: 

WILLIAMS. M. A. C. 

Captain Elder. 1. e. r. e., Crossman 
Swain. 1. t. r. 1.. Sexton, Crosby 
Harter. 1. g. r. g., Willis 
Morse, c. c. Paige 
Reid, r, g. 1. g.. Anderson 
Brooks, r. t. 1. t„ Farley 
Pratt, r. e. 1. e., Turner 
Williams, Winter, q. b. q. b.. Captain Cobb 
Brown, 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Morgan 
D. Brown, r, h. b. 1. h. b., Warner 
Robb. Lament, f b. f. b., Schermerhorn 
Score— Williams 5. M. A. C. 4. Touchdown— Robb. 
Goal from field — Cobb. Umpire — Dr. Collins of Northamp- 
ton, Referee — Eastor. of Yale. Field judges — Lally and 
Thompson. Linemen — Gutterson and Webb. Time — 15- 
minute halves. 



NEW ADDITIONS TO THE FACULTY. 

Ray L. Gribben, B. S. A., comes to us as 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry. Professor Gribben 
received the B. S. A. degree from the Iowa State 
College in 1906 and since that time has been Assist- 
ant in Animal Husbandry at the same Institution, 
having charge of the Stock Judging. He was a 
member of the Stock Judging Team at the Interna- 
tional Stock Show at Chicago in 1905. 

Wm. M. Thornton, Jr. , M. A., who graduated 
from the Hampden Sydney College, Virginia In 1904 
with the B. A. degree and who received the M. A. 
degree from the Universty of Virginia comes to M. 
A. C. as Instructor in Chemistry. 

Ernest C. Fowler, B. S., Michigan Agricultural 
College, '07, and Arthur D. Holmes, B. S., of Dart- 
mouth, '06, are also Instructors in Chemistry. 

Among the new members of the faculty we are 
glad to welcome James A. Foord, M. S. A., who 
comes to M. A. C. as Associate Professor of Agron- 
omy. Mr. Foord graduated in 1898 from the New 
Hampshire College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts 
with the degree of B. S. He afterwards took grad- 
uate worK at Cornell University, where he received 
the degree of M.S. A. in 1902, and was elected to 
the Social of Sigma Xi. From 1 900 to 1 903 Pro- 
fessor Foord was an Assistant in the Experiment Sta- 
tion at Cornell University; he then went to the Dela- 
ware State College as Professor of Agriculture, which 
position he held until 1906. Since that time he has 
been Associate Professor of Agronomy at the Ohio 
State University. 



MR. HERRICK. 

L. R. Herrick, instructor in French and Spanish 
since 1902, has resigned to accept a position in the 
language department of the University of Wisconsin. 
Mr. Herrick graduaded from Amherst college in 
1902, receiving his bachelor's degree, and in the fal| 
of the same year came to M. A. C. as instructor in 
the language department. Besides a natural aptitude 
for teaching, Mr. Herrick has traveled extensively 
abroad, particularly in France and Spain, and thus 
is exceptionally well fitted for the work in those lan- 
guages which he teaches. His work at Wisconsin, 
— an institution of some 4,000 students, will be of a 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



more advanced type, thus offering greater opportuni- 
ties for his abilities. He will teach three years of 
French, and Spanish. The Signal desires to express 
the regret of the student body at the loss to the 
college of Mr. Herrick, and to convey to him the 
best wishes of all who have known him at M. A. C. 
To take Mr. Herrick's place, Dr. A. Armagnac of 
Amherst has been temporarily appointed as insrtuctor 
In French and Spanish. Dr. Armagnac is a Prince- 
ton graduate, receiving his doctor's degree at that 
university. He is of French parentage and thus 
thoroughly familiar with the language. He is also a 
master of Greek and German, and has for many 
years been engaged in preparing men especially for 
university work and work of advanced standing. He 
was with the University of Indiana for several years, 
being at present a resident of Amhert. Dr. Armag- 
nac's appointment took effect the 1st of October. 



6. If a candidate is not pledged at this time he is 
not eligible for membership to any fraternity until 
June 1 of the same year, except by special arrange- 
ment of the Fraternity Conference. 



RUSHING RULES. 

1 . No candidate for fraternity membership shall 
be spoken to, nor shown literature pertaining to, nor 
approached in any manner whatsoever in regard to 
fraternities or fraternity membership until after the 
chapel exercises on the first Monday of the second 
semester. 

2. No candidate for fraternity membership shall 
be spoken to nor shown literature pertaining to nor 
approached in any manner whatsover regarding frater- 
nities or fraternity membership from 6 p. m. on Thurs- 
day of the same week until after chapel of the fol- 
lowing morning. 

3. The wearing of a fraternity pin or badge by a 
candidate shall signify that the wearer is pledged to 
that fraternity and the pin or pledge emblem shall be 
voluntarily put on by the candidate himself during the 
chapel exercises of the following morning. No ver- 
bal or written promise shall be valid. 

4. No candidate shall be taken out of town dur- 
the above mentioned "working season" and no frater- 
nity man shall associate with such candidate 
while out of town during the aforesaid season. 

5. No spread, -banquet or entertainment shall be 
given to a candidate by any fraternity or group of fra- 
ternity men during the "working season" and no fra- 
ternity or group of fraternity men shall give a banquet 
prior to the working season. 



DECLARED DRAW. 

The annual tug-of-war across the college pond 
which took place Sept. 20 between the two lower 
classes was called off and declared a draw after 12 
minutes of continued seesawing without any distinct 
advantage being gained by either side. The sopho- 
mores had the choice of sides, choosing the west 
bank, the number of men on each side being 37, a 
number equal to 90? of the sophomore class. As 
the freshmen had over 80 men to choose from, they 
far surpassed the sophomores in weight, but this 
advantage was entirely made up for by the determin- 
ation and spirit of the sophomores. Upon the report 
of a pistol in the hands of Prof. C. E. Gordon, 
referee, both sides adopted the same tactics and 
dropped on the rope. After a short period of inac- 
tivity upon both sides they simultaneously commenced 
to heave. The stretching of the rope at first aroused 
great hilarity on both sides of the pond, but it was 
soon evident that neither side was giving ground or 
rope. The remainder of the contest was merely 
repetition of the first few moments,— the sides both 
alternately heaving and resting. At the end of 1 2 
minutes, the president of the Senate, owing to the 
exhausted condition of both sides, declared the con- 
test a draw, and requested the referee to end the 
contest with a final pistol shot. If the contest had 
been allowed to continue one side would have event- 
ually outlasted the other, with the result that men 
thoroughly exhausted would have been dragged into 
the pond subjecting them to danger:, which in 
another condition would be trivial. A? the contest 
was originally designed to be decisive, some disap- 
pointment was evidenced in the decision of the Sen- 
ate, but upon reflection it must be agreed that the 
Senate adopted the wiser course. A few changes 
and additions to irtfl rules, forbidding the use of the 
drop and heave and making the men stand on their 
feet and pull, as in the similar contest of last year, 
will eliminate all future unsatisfactory results of the 
tug-of-war. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ROLL OF 

Adams, James F. 
Allen, Park W. 
Armstrong, Ralph 
Baker, Herbert J. 
Barrows, Raymond C- 
Beals, Carlos L. 
Becker, John 
Bentley, A. G. 
Blaney, Herbert W. 
Bliss, William H. 
Brown, Edgar M. 
Brown, Irving C. 
Burnham, Arthur 
Burseley, Allyn P. 
Chadbourne, James G. 
Coash, William H. 
Coles, Chester E. 
Conant, Arthur T. 
Damon, Charles M. 
Davey, James A. 
Davis, Egbert N. 
Davis, Irving W. 
Denslow, Raymond A. 
Drury, Harold B. 
Fitzgerald, Edward 
Gilgore, Irvin C. 
Grey, George H. 
Gunn, Clarence A. 
Hallowell, Royal N. 
Hammond, Charles P. 
Harrington, Henry 
Hazen, |acob 
Hennessy, William F. 
Henry, Willard F. 
Hill, Herbert N. 
Howe, Harold H. 
Huang, Chen-Hua 
Hyatt, Herbert F. 
Jenks, Albert R. 
Johnson, Leonard M. 
Labouteley, Gaston E. 
Larrabee, Edward A. 
Lew, Gerard N. 
Liang, Ying Chi 
Lodge, Charles A. 
Loker, Walter M. 



CLASS OF 1911. 

Melrose 
Westfield 
Holyoke 
Selbyville, Del. 
Stafford Springs, Conn. 
Sunderland 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Swampscott 
Springfield 
Springfield 
Natick 
Holyoke 
West Barnstable 
Bridgton, Me. 
Lawrence 
Attleboro 
Sunderland 
Haydenville 
Kent, 0. 
Natick 
Lowell 
East Longmeadow 
Athol 
Bondsville 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Chelsea 
Southampton 
Jamaica Plain 
Lynn 
Rockland 
Georgetown 
Dorchester 
Hopedale 
Clenmoore, N. J. 
Springfield 
Tientsin, China 
Leominster 
Three Rivers 
Easthampton 
Lynn 
Salem 
Lowell 
Tientsin, China 
Manchester 
Natick 



McGann, Philip S. 
McLaughlin, Fred A. 
McNayr, Rupert S. 
Merrill, Charles E. 
Merrill, George B. 
Moody, Chester 
Morse, Henry B. 
Nickerson, George B. 
Ostrolenk, Bernhard 
Packard, Clyde M. 
Parsons, Samuel R. 
Patch, Roland H. 
Pauley, Herman A. 
Phipps, William R. 
Pickard, Percy F. 
Piper, Ralph W. 
Prouty, Philip H. 
Racicot, Philias A. 
Robb, Gordon H. 
Roberts, Charles E. 
Robinson, Ralph C. 
Robinson, Sturgis M. 
Rockwood, Albert F. 
Rosenbaum, Joseph 
Schmitz, Frank J. 
Sharpe, Arthur H. 
Smith, C. A. 
Smith, Reymond G. 
Spencer, Howard 
Stevenson, Oswald 
Wheeler, Ralph E. 
Whittaker, E. Carl 
Willard, Harold F. 
Wood, Alton P. 
Williams, George 
Young, Donnell B. 
Daniels, Ernest 



Somerville 

Lee 

Rockland 

Somerville 

North Ablngton 

Chelsea 

Salem 

Amherst 

Gloversvllle, N. Y. 

Springfield 

North Amherst 

Wenham 

Somerville 

Holllston 

Hopedale 

South Acton 

Shrewsbury 

Lowell 

Salem 

Amherst 

South Boston 

East Weymouth 

Concord 

Woodbine, N. J. 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Saxonville 

Northampton 

Lynn 

Belchertown 

England 

Foxboro 

Ravenna, O. 

Leominster 

Braintree 

Belchertown 

North Hanover 

Cambridge 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

The Summer School of Agriculture opened July 9 
and extended four weeks, until Aug. 2. To say that 
it was a "great success'* is but putting it mildly. 
Probably no one can estimate the good it has done the 
college, directly and indirectly. That it was primarily 
designed for the purpose of bringing before the public 
the college and its work was frankly admitted. And 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I 



that it has accomplished that purpose even more than 
was anticipated is being shown to greater satisfaction 
every -<ay. The total enrollment of the Summer 
School was 212, only 10fr of whom were men. Of 
this number 171 were from Massachusetts cities and 
towns, over 75 of which were represented. Worces- 
ter led with a delegation of 2 1 , Springfield sent 15, 
and the next highest figures were Brockton and Am- 
herst 11. Many states other than Massachusetts 
were also represented. Most of these were teachers 
and principals, with schools under their charge. And 
who is in better position to advertise the good work of 
the college, its ideal location, and efficient corps of 
instructors? When the session was nearly complete, 
the 212 organized themselves into an association 
called the "Massachusetts Agricultural College Sum- 
mer School Association" with C. W. Haley of Mil- 
ford as president. The association represents not 
merely an aggregation of individuals who happened to 
meet together in a common pursuit, but a band of 
enthusiastic lovers of the ideals of education and labor 
which the college represents and pledged to use their 
influence in bringing before others the college and its 
work. And evidences are already on record that the 
Summer School people are talking, writing, working 



awarded certificates for work satisfactorily done. 
Besides these regular courses, lectures were given in 
the chapel at least one evening in the week, and fre- 
quently two. by such men as Dr. Conn of Wesleyan. 
Dr. Hodge of Clark. Professor Waugh of Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, and others equally promin- 
ent in their special lines. Members of the faculty 
frequently assisted with lectures in one course or 

another. 

So much for the business of working. As much 
careful preparation and thought was given to the busi- 
ness of pleasure taking. An afternoon trip to some 
place of interest was arranged for Wednesday of each 
week. Trips to Deerfield, the Orient, and nature 
study tramps were arranged for these afternoons. 
Every Saturday was given up to all all-day excursions, 
such as to Mt. Tom. the tramp over the Holyoke 
Range, and over Toby. These excursions were all 
well attended, and in each case special cars were 
provided for the accommodation of the enthusiasts. 
But not the least of all pleasure-providing occurences 
were the bi-weekly dances in the Drill Hall. A 
three-piece orchestra, of which perhaps the less said 
the better, provided music, and many pleasant even- 
ings -pleasant for all but the orchestra— were spent 



asking himself where they got hold of the music, was 
informed that it was obtained out of a band folio. 
The girls also formed a baseball team, but lacking a 
competent coach, and flatly refusing any male help, 
were obliged to discontinue practice. Rumor has it 
that there was also trouble over the election of a cap- 
tain and in deciding who should pitch. So there was 
plenty of fun and good cheer mixed in with the more 
serious work, and it was the ideal combination of the 
two which made the Summer School the success it 
proved to be. 



Summer bchoo. peop.e are ».»..«. w s , ~ » » . , orchestra was composed of college 

for the college. Women have not the reputation of ^ ; porches * 



being a silent race. Registrations for another year 
are headed with the names of 91 of this year's asso- 
ciation,— an argument conclusive in itself. 

Perhaps we can place the aims which the Summer 
School sought to attain under two heads: 1st. to give 
the students a good course of instruction along 
advanced lines of thought, and 2d. to give the stu- 
dents a "good time" at the college. And Dean 
Waugh and Director White succeeded in both aims 
admirably. The courses of instruction were eight: 
Plant Life, both elementary and advanced by Profes- 
sor White; Animal life, taken up successively by sev- 
eral men. Dr. Paige, bees, Dr. Weed, insect life, 
and State Ornithologist Forbush, bird life; Plant Cul- 
ture by Mr. Scott; School Gardening, by Mr. Hemen- 
way; Practical Gardening, by Mr. Hemenway; 
Nature Study, out-of-door tramps; and Pedagogy by 
Professor Hart and Dr. Emerson. Many of the stu- 
dents took all the courses, while others proverbially did 
no more than they were obliged to. But as most of 



talent, which has never been very well developed 
Some of the Summer School people insisted that the 
music was fine— a dead give-a-way on their part. 
No matter, it sufficed. While there was always a 
generous supply of young ladies upon the floor, the 
supply of men folk was rather low. But Professor 
Waugh helped out. It was indeed surprising how 
many gentlemen did gravitate toward the Drill Hall 
on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. There were 
other little good times, too. some of them more of a 
private nature, and over which the veil of silence has 
been thrown. The two receptions, one at the open- 
ing and the other at the closing of the session, were 
models of what receptions should be. vivacious, free 
from dullness and awkward pauses. There was noth- 
ing very frigid about the Summer School girls.— a 
very congenial and sociable lot. The editor was 
rather surprised at the end of the first week, upon 
passing the band-stand near the chapel, to hear a 
goodly chorus of girls sing "Bay State's Loyal Sons 



^"^n^™. o,,h;„; werefare We, He was asKed ,o CUOse, and upon 



ASSIGNMENT OF PRIZES IN JUNE. 

CRINNELL AGRICULTURE PRIZE. 

1st prize of $25 to James Hervey Walker. 
2nd prize of $15 to John Thomas Caruthers. 

HILLS BOTANICAL PRIZE. 

Prize of $15 for the best general herbarium to 
Ralph Jerome Watts. 

MILITARY HONORS. 

The following cadets, members of the senior class, 
were reported to the Adj. General of the U.S. A. 
and to the Adj. Gen. of Mass. as showing special 
aptitude for military service : Walter Ebenezer Dick- 
inson, John Nicholas Summers, Frederick Charles 
Peters, Ralph Jerome Watts. 

FLINT PRIZES. 

Awarded to members of the junior class who pro- 
duce the best and second best orations. 
1st prize of $30 to David Larsen. 
2nd prize of $20 to Thomas Addis Barry 

iURNHAM PRIZES FOR DECLAMATIONS TO FRESHMAN. 

1st prize of $25 to Louis Brandt. 

2nd prize of $20 to Allen James Robb. 

FORESTRY PRIZE. 

1st prize of $25 to Fred Alexander Watkins of the 
senior class. 

2nd prize of $15 to Joseph Otis Chapman of the 
enior class. 

J. W. D. FRENCH PRIZE IN ARBORICULTURE. 

Offered to the writer of the best essay on the street 
rees of Amherst. 
1st prize of $25 to Orton Loring Clark of the junior 

:lass. 



THE WESTERN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PRIZE. 

Offered to that member of the sophomore class 
who during his two years in college has shown the 
greatest improvement in scholarship, character and 
example. 

$25 to Myron Wood Thompson. 

ENTOMOLOCICAL PRIZES. 

Two entomological prizes, one of $20 and one of 
$10, have been established by graduates of this col- 
lege working in entomology, to the two members of 
the senior class taking that subject, who have most 
fully satisfied certain requirements of work indicated 
by the donors. These prizes we given this year for 
the first time. 

1st prize has been awarded to Arthur Huguenln 
Armstrong of Hyde Park. 

2nd prize to Robert Poland Wood of Hopedale. 

Colleg? Notts- 

—Pray, '06, and Willis, '05, visited college Sept. 
27th. 

— Woodward and Curtis, '10, have entered Dart- 
mouth. 

— The Y. M. C. A. on Thursday, Sept. 26, was 
led by 0. S. Gray. 

— Sunday mornings, chapel will be held at 9-15 
o'clock until Easter. 

George H. Brown. '09. has resigned his position 
upon the Signal Board. 

— The back stop has been painted : a clean score 
card for a new list of victories. 

— At a mass meeting Wednesday, Sept. 25, the 
usual football tax of $3.50 was levied. 

— Mr. Forrestall the Farm Sup't was judge of 
sheep and swine at Great Barrington Sept. 25. 

— K. E. Gillette, '08, will assist in the junior work 
in arboriculture one afternoon each week, Tuesday. 

— Photographs by Professor White illustrate an 
interesting article in the last member of Suburban 
Life. 

— Work is being pushed on the new Botany build- 
ing and it is hoped that classes will soon be In running 
order. 









1 



8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



_E V. Bennett, '09, has been very low with 
rheumatic (ever this summer and is unable to return 
to college 



-The Sunday morning chapel Sept. 29 was led by 
Professor Tyler of Amherst College. The disagree- 
able weather prevented a very full attendance, I 



- college. u v u cumstanC e much to be regretted, as Professor Tyler 

_Quite a number of students attended the Va ley | cular|y interes ting in his little talk. 

Fair at Brattleboro and report a fine exhibit of cattle ^^ Wednesday at 1 -30 o'clock there will be 

particularly of Herefords. assembly of the student body taking the place 

-Forty years ago today the College opened its * morning chapel. It is planned to use 

doors to the members of the class of 1871, the first | ot w y _ Uorino , and mass meet- 

class to enroll at M. A. C. 



The belfry has been removed from the old 
chemistry building the roof has been slated and many 
interior changes have been made. 

-This year drill is to consist of four forty minute 
periods. When winter shuts down one half the bat- 
talion will be excused two days a week 

_The barn has been finished and the herd moved 
,nto its new up-to-date quarters. Valuable additions 
have been made to the head during the summer. 

-President and Mrs. Butterfleld gave a reception 
Friday night, Sept. 20, to the new members of the 
faculty all the members of the faculty being invited. 
-An interesting illustrated article on the College 
and the Summer school in particular appeared in the 
Boston Sunday Globe, Sept. 8. The author was 
Miss Tighe, one of the Summer school girls. 

-At the New England Fair at Worcester, Sept 



this assembly for student gatherings and mass meet 
ings and also to have speakers of note at times. 

-The first informal dance of the year will be held 
Saturday afternoon and evening, immediately fo.low- 
fng the game with Rhode Island. A good attendance 
is expected, and particularly are the freshmen urged 
to support these social functions in the college life. 
The informal dance committee has been chosen as 
follows : Chairman, J. R. P-ker, 1908, R^ H. 
Verbeck, 1908, L. W. Chapman, 1908. H. J. 

Neale ,1909. 

-The total enrollment this year is at present writ- 
ing 243 The freshman class numbers 83, and the 
numbers of the upper classes have been increased as 
follows: 1908, Hutchins, ex-'05, Larned ex- 07 , 
1909, White, ex-'08, and Barlow, ex- 07 and 
Warters of Storrs ; .910, French, ex- '09 Eddy 
ex-'09 Burke, ex-'09, and Armstrong of Rutherford, 
N. J.' Two members of the senior class, 



_At the New England Fair at Worcester, ^k- N . j. iwo nieniuc- v,. — -— 
3 4 and 5, the college exhibit attracted much atten- and HysloPi have not yet returned to college 
, . 1 ia- ^ m mpnt hnth of the press and of _. onnna i reC eDtion tendered to m< 



tlon and favorable comment both of the press and of 
the fair management. The Ayrshyre exhibit was 
particularly good. 

Several Sunday papers, among them the Globe, 
Republican and WiA*. contained last week full page 
articles upon the college and its work all profusely 
illustrated with many excellent photographs of the col- 



_The annual reception tendered to members of 
the entering class by the Y. M. C. A. was held Fri- 
day evening. Sept. 27. in the chapel. Among the 
speakers of the evening were Pres. K. L. Butterfield. 
K E. Gillette, and R. H. Verbeck. Special music 
was also on the program, including a piano solo by 
Barlow 09. violin duets by Adams, .09. and Roci- 



lege buildings. 

—The Trophy room in North College, formerly the 

reading room, is beginning to show what it is going to 1WS 

he AH the remodeling on the buildings has been was voted a success 

delayed by the summer school, lack of funds and 

scarcity of workmen. 

-The mathematics department has moved into the 
old Botany building and the Chemical department 
now has the whole of the old Chemistry and Physics 
building except a room in the top which has been fin- 
ished off for Professor Holcomb's use. | 



'11, selections by a male quartette and a vocal 
sob by Mat Bullock, coach of the football team. The 
reception was very well attended and on the whole 



-88 —Prof. F. S. Cooley, for several years Pro- 
fessor' of Animal Husbandry at M. A. C. resigned 
recently iu take the position of Supervisor of Farmers 
Institutes for the state of Montana. His headquarters 
will be at Bozeman, Mont. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



D?p&rtm*rvf f^ot^s. 



HORTICULTURE. 
The division of horticulture has recently published 
a very interesting and neat advertising pamphlet on 
"Modern Training in Horticulture," putting forth an 
outline of the different horticultural subjects taught, 
together with the equipment and personnel for the 
teaching of them. The importance of the horticul- 
tural work in the college is shown by the fact that out 
of the 77 graduates from departments of the college 
during the last three years, 39 have gone Into the 
general field of horticulture. 

During the summer new cement floors have been 
laid in the basement of Wilder Hall, and new appar 
atus of sundry kinds purchased. 

Professor Waugh has gathered together some very 
interesting and rare old works on horticultural and 
botanical subjects, such as Gerardes Herball, published 
in 1636 in which "the description on," "the place," 
"the temperature," "the virtues," medicinal and 
otherwise, of the different plants are set forth. The 
antique wood cuts of the different plants are quite 
unique. Another very rare work is the Historian 
Plantarium of Johanne Bauhino published in 1650 
and written in Latin. This work is very valuable in 
tracing back the old varieties of the different fruits. 
A modern work, the Jardin Fruition of J. Decaisne 
contains some remarkably fine lithographic plates of 

fruits. 

Mr. J. K. Shaw, a graduate of the University of 
Vermont, Is taking post graduate work in this division 
working towards a master's degree. 
ENTOMOLOGY. 

With every work table in the Entomological Lab- 
oratory taken, fourteen of the seniors had to be 
refused because of lack of accommodations. It was 
only possible to accommodate the twenty seniors now 
taking entomology through the action of the trustees 
In providing for extra equipment for night work tables 
hitherto unequipped. 

Owing to the non-arrival of apparatus ordered, 
senior laboratory work will not begin for about a week. 

During the summer C. W. Hooker, A. H. Arm- 
strong and H. M. Jennison have been acting as dep- 
uty nursery inspectors. 



The graduate students in entomology this year are 
H. J. Franklin, C. W. Hooker, A. H. Armstrong 
and J. K. Shaw. 

ENGLISH. 
The department of English is about to Issue a bul- 
letin. This will contain an outline of the courses in 
English for the year and general directions for the 
preparation of all written work done under the super- 
vision of the department. It will contain also a table 
of common processes and errors in composition. 
The bulletin will be used as a handbook by all stu- 
dents doing work in English. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The retirement of Prof. C. A. Goessmann has 
made it necessary to reorganize the chemical work of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. 
The chemical department and the department of 
foods and feeding have been united and is now known 
as the department of plant and animal chemistry. 
Dr. J. B. Lindsey, who was one of the assistant 
chemists when the first experiment station was estab- 
lished in 1882, and who, since 1892, has been con- 
tinually connected with the station, has been placed 
at the head of the new department with the title of 
chemist. E. B. Holland, likewise in the employ of 
the station since 1892, has been made associate 
chemist. The department as now organized consists 
of three separate divisions, namely, research, fertil- 
izer and feed and dairy. Mr. Holland will have 
charge of the former, and associated with him will be 
Dr. R. D. MacLaurin. 

The work of this division will be along strictly orig- 
inal lines in connection with problems in animal life 
and plant nutrition. Studies are now In progress rel- 
ative to the effect of separate food constituents upon 
the formation of butter fat, and an investigation will 
soon be instituted concerning the effect of different 
chemical ingredients upon the physical and chemical 
character of soils. 

The fertilizer division has been placed in charge of 
H. D. Haskins, since 1880 assistant to Professor 
Goessmann, who will carry out the provisions of the 
law regulating the sale of commercial fertilizer in the 
state, and supervise the examination of the numerous 
substances sent for analysis. P. H. Smith will 
assume charge of the feed and dairy division, and has 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



11 



. uino tho sale of concentrated feed stuns, anu 
controlling he sale o. ^ Qf ^ 

the one entitled "An act tor n P inspsct ion 

m This latter aw requires the yeariy m=>y 

a so examine dairy v^ testing of 

feed divisions, and Roy uasiuu 

. .nutrition It is believed that the plan of reor 
animal nutrition. 11 ■ ( 

, mm u/hich went nto effect July i. wmsc 

:,l P ln whose MM* the s.a.lor, was «*££ 
Dr R D. McLauren who began work at the Mas 

«hu*tts Agricultural Experiment Station Sep, 1 
L res aoh chemist, was born in Canada, was grad^ 

^d "m the Vanlee, HiU Collegiate Instdu e a 

L McMaster Univers.ty fJ'T^^'^Z 

, rom -he la.^ ^titutone d r- ^ ^ 

A M. He entered narvaru w 

t,e student in 1903 and received the ^«™f- 

m 1906, since which time he has been workmg a, the 

McLauren 4 „ H has already published 

bU< alS ,° valuale contributions in organic chemistry, 
several valuable comnu Jackson "being 

ratam^'Udrr^he^ica, s,a« o, the 
station. 



Alumni. 



lawn Ave. 



^Ts^rmaeTL^aron Holmes, for the past five 

ears onf of the associate judges of the Massachu- 
years one t lawyers in 

bor'o and graduated from M. A. C. in the class of 
b ," ' He stuuied law in the office of Stetson & 
Green o Boston and was admitted to practrce ,n | 

IR7S ludge Holmes was elected city 

=■- ~ 4r irrarr 

rln:;,,ro,Cinc:;ra,o r , the board of 

eieciea u.3i appointed 

^he^rcourrw^positlonhehelda. 

Club of N« Bedford. He leaves a widow and one 
adopted daughter. 

-73 -Edward G. Howe, science teacher, Engle- 
Jd High school, UK Residence,! :233 Wood St., 

Chicago, III. 

75 -Lauren K. Lee, advertising agency, L. N. 
Lee k Son, 611 Ryan Bldg.. St. Paul, Minn. 
Residence 631 St. Anthony Ave. 

79 -George H. Mann, erecting engineer with the 
B . F. Sturtevant Co., Hyde Park. Residence, 68 
Stoughton Ave., Readville. 

■84-Llewell Smith, representative Norfolk 
Clones Reel Co., 25 Mercantile St. , Worcester. 
Residence, 679 Main St., Worcester. 

-87.-Wi.liam N. Tolman, civil engineer in 
employ of United Gas Improvement Co., 24 N. 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

•88 -Samuel H. Field, farmer, North Hatfield. 
-89 -Arthur Davis Copeland of Brockton died at 
Emerson hospital, Boston, Sept. 3 after an operation 
for appendicitis. He leaves a wife, worn a 

ried in 1898 and who was Miss Jessie Lothop of 
W s Bridgewater, and one son, Dwight Lothrop, 
He was born in 1869 in the house now occupied b 
his father on Copeland St., Brockton, and which was 
"en West Bridgewater. His own late residence 



at 494 Copeland St., was on the farm joining that of 
this father. For some ten years he ran a flourist's 
business in partnership with a Mr. Cooper of Brockton 
and for three years had been in the grain business on 
Moniello St., Brockton. Mr. Copeland was held in 
high esteem both in social and business circles. 
Three of his classmates, F. W. Davis, of the Boston 
Record, Dr. A. L. Miles of Cambridge, and Mr. R. 
P. Sellew of Boston were able to attend the funeral, 
and the floral tributes, which were unusually bountiful, 
included one from his classmates at M. A. C. 

'94. —Louis M. Barker, 377 West Main St., 
Waterbury, Conn., with Brinley & Holbrook, Land- 
scape Architects, New York city. At present in 
charge of constructian of Waterbury Countjy Club. 
'97. _C. F. Palmer has been recently elected 
instructor in nature study and biology, Los Angeles 
Normal school, Los Angeles, Cal. Mr. Palmer's 
work at Los Angeles will be largely along the line of 
school gardens. 

'98. —Married, June 26th, 1907, Willis Sykes 
Fisher of Melrose, to Miss Lillian Clark, 197 Dart- 
mouth St., Springfield. 

j99. — Dr. W. E. Hinds, who has been engaged in 
the cotton ball weevil investigations of the U. S. 
Bureau of Entomology in Texas since the completion 
of his graduate work at M. A. C. in 1902 has recently 
received appointment to the Chair of Entomology and 
as Entomologist of the Alabama Polytechnic Institute, 
Auburn, Alabama. He takes up his work at that 
institution on October first. 

'99, — W. E. Chapln, teacher in charge of Com- 
mercial Department, Wakefield High school, Make- 
field, was married June 27th at Chicopee to Miss 
Edna Briggs, art teacher, Wesleyan academy 
Wilbraham. 

'01. P. C. Brooks, foreman of Silicate of Soda 

Department at Calmunt Works of the General Chemi- 
cal Co., Obegwisch, 111. Residence, 418 Englewood 
Ave.,Englewood Station, Chicago, III. 

N1NETEEN-SEVEN. 

A. H. Armstrong, graduate student in Entomology, 
M. A. C. 

B. G. Bartlett, Instructor in Botany, M. A. C. 
W. F. Chace, Mlddleboro. 



G. H. Chapman, first asst. botanist, Mass. Agri- 
cultural Experimental Station, Amherst. 

J. O. Chapman, Brewster. 

M. H. Clark, Jr., foreman for The Newark Park 
Commission, forestry work, 29 Orchard St., Newark, 
N. j. 

F. A. Cutter, Greenwich, Conn. 

W. E. Dickinson, asst. chemist, Mass. Agricul- 
tural Experimental Station, Amherst. 

L. F. Eastman, assistant agriculturist, New Hamp- 
shire State college, Durham, N. H. 

A. A. Hartford, Westford. 

A. W. Higgins, cut flowers, Westfield. 

Clinton King, student at Boston University Law 
school. Address, 28 Sagamore St., Dorchester. 

C. M. Parker, Riverside Farm, Portsmouth Ave., 
Stratham, N. H. 

F. C. Peters, in charge of the branch office of H. 
L. Frost & Co., 157 North 20th St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

E. H. Shaw, Belmont. 

J. N. Summers, assistant entomologist Mass. 

Agricultural Experimental Station and graduate stu- 
dent in entomology M. A. C. 

C. B. Thompson, Instructor in The Kamchameha 
school, Honululu, Hawaii. 

J. H. Walker, foreman Newark Park Commission, 
29 Orchard St., Newark, N. J. 

R. J. Watts, teacher in Choate Private school, 
Wallingford, Conn. 

F. A. Watkins, West Millbury. 
H. P. Wood, assistant In entomology, M. A. C. 



LET 



"BILL 



9 I 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. TURNER. 

ll'LEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL ^^^ 

T^MrLABROVlTZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

II. HI) 



Don 't Walk on J™***** 
Custom-made"Boots and Shoes, \ Dyblgi am*g. Pn*«-***—*' 

lU-pidrti'tfii specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

ortom* town iuix- 



A 11. inters promptly attended tu. 
^•Full Dreat* Suits to rent. «*" 



U Amity Street, Amhbimt, Mass. 



GOODS FOR MEN 



Geo. F. Vester Jr. 



TAILOR 



AND 




44 



For the 



Land's Sake " 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



DRAPER 



485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



TELEPHONE- 



& K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOI.ENS 

"coSo STYLES, IMPORTED DIRRCT 
C FROM U»Nl" 

camrToisi, 

tailor and haberdasher, 



ouveR TYpeWRiretfs, 

RIBBONS FOR ALL MAKES. 



STILLWELL GAS FIXTURES AND MANTLES 

MOTORCYCLES AND BICYCLES, 

HIGGIN'S DRAWING INKS. 



j^CKSON & CUTLER, 



AMHERST, MASS 



REPAIR BHOP< 

[Prepaaed to mend anythimg except umbrellas. 

l£. A.. ^rJH[OI\ll*«OJV, 



■Ke.-ir First National Hank, 



AMHERST 



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old South Street, ofl Main 



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th streei, «'» — , . 



,, ,, v \ i <t,ire is the place to buy. 

^ZE^wmSss-b Everything New and Up to Date. 

Blankets, Comfortables and RATES, $2.00 PEE. DAT. 

' Wk«» in " Hump." " to P with "• 




Caps and Gotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 



Lowest prices. Best ivorkmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, s Confectionery and Fruit, 



THE BEST PL^tTOWmW THE CITY 

R. J. 




COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Av*> , Nkw York. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

<iroirs Strong. Vigorous, //« ulltiij I'huits That 1,'isist Distaxr 

I>K. 6COBOB K. 8TONK. Professor of liotany "t UmHM». 
a k i-it-n it in-it i college, and Prof eaaor ol Plant Dlaeaaea at the 
Hatch Kxpertment tttatloa, aihIkthi, Mass., write* t<» our 

A;.Mi< nlliii nl Kxpert as follows 

" i win -iiy timt i consider the formal* which you 
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these bedl convince me that It constituted the l>c-.t 
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OBHUIMI l'KKt'VIAN (il!A. v O forme.l the basis of the 

above mentioned formula. It whh need on the nsperana beds 
<if c, \v. I'ukhcott., Concord, Maaa., tbe largest individual 
grower of Asparagus In New Kngland. We also offer 

WK also oran 

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Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing material from New York, lloston, 

Mass., and Charleston, S. C. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant Food 

Problems," is sent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

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33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



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Providence, R. I., Cambridge, Maaa. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH _ 

27 Main St., n«rjot Open every day. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, OP^ ^ ^ exceU ent 
Luncn.s. ConfecUonery^, Ugar..^ cbow(ler> 

ciowd onlyfrom^^^J^ 

igrwTBOTHTOHr 

MAHOFACTUBKK OF 

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THE OLD 80BHER DIP STORE. 



OUR ICE C1W SOOR 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



POWERS* 
THE TAILOR, 

oJmentH in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

^Military Work a Specialty.-^! 

^.«« „ - Amherst, Mass. 
Under the Tost Offlc<s^^^J^_ 

AMERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Dale. 

Special Attention g^o^etic , Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 
BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D . H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 

and carpet Reiw* Establishment 

0« S.mpl. R«« I" V, " W '°!f„ 

H. ^. Frr * r, Manmger. 

OFFIC« ! 

East Pleasa nt St reet. 

Buy Yonr Candy, Soda, Botany Supplies, 
Stationery Banners, etc. 



M. A. C '82, 



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Store, 11 Amity St., Amhebst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AT THE 



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OFFICE HOURS 
O TO 18 A.. 3M-, 1-30 TO 6 I>_ fcrt. 

Ether and Nitrons Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



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VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHKRST. MASS. 



High Grade Stationery, .-. 
Stamping and Embossing. 

JEWELRY, CLOCK REPAIRING. 

Music and Musical Merchandise. 




AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cam will leave Amherst for Northampton on tin- hour ami 
half hour from «..W a.m. till 10.00 i\ M. Sunday* the flrxt car 
will lMV« ut Ut A. M. 

Cars leave Northampton for Amherst M tlu- hour nml lutlf 
hour, from <!.:«> a. m. t« II r. u. The la«t oar wiitt* for play* at 
tin- Academy <>f Mtmlc and for the train from SpriiiKlh-hldue 
t<> arrive at 11.03. 

S|>c('lal cars on application. 

Main Orm, Gkkknuki.k, Mahb. 
John A.TaKgart, Supt. 

Northampton OtTOCB, \<*i Main St. 
C. W. Clapp, A8»t. Supt. 

Telephone, Northampton, 1782. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.6S i\ m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amtierei 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED To OCT. «, 1900. 



Jeweler-F. W. RCBERTS-Optician 

197 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



C. R. ELDER, 

All kinds of 

HEATING, PLUMBING AND GAS WORK. 

HUNTS BLOCK, AMHERST. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 i\ m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 v. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. K. BKNTLKY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 









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You will want some Flowers 
for Commencement. 

See Mr. Connors about it. 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE, I A. t 

Telephone. 

L H- TOUBTKLOTTE 
AllTHUU E. DOKK. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

„ . .11 KK8 AND JOBBER* 1* 
W IIOl.KHAt.lt PEAI.KKB AKU 

POULTRY AND GAiWE, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, WO VEAL 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

goliiZlaTOS 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

' society, CIbbs and^roupWork a Specialty. 

A J. SCHILLARE, 

"" J . Northampton, Mass. 

142 Main Street, 

Tel. 332-2. 




T „K I.AHCEST OOI.I.KOK KNGKAV- 
DM HOVSK IN TI1K WORI.l>. 

Worts : nth StreetfcLeWBUMe. 

JO PHUDllPItt, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

C ° and Class Day Programs I 

Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Tins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Ilalf-Toncs. 



J. L. DANA, 

I NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

casks, bakn. «*> »~^2£ MAS , 

Telephone Connection, ^ p _ — 

j.H.TROTT 

PLPEB, STFJH 4 G»S F.TTEH, 
nig nm ■ stoves m wb. 



MhiIMMM I'i.kasant St. 



Teleptioni' 3*'-i' 



"^TiTSAGBATH & SON 

(Passenger andlaggage Transfer. 



AMHERST COOP. 



Wo carry a full line of Hooks, Stationery, Athletic* 



Goods and Novelties. 




MOORE'S NON LEAKABLE AND 



WATERMAN IDEAL FOUNTAIN PENS. 



THE DISPATCH FOUNTAIN PEN $1.00. 



Don't Forget to Join the CO=OP, 

$I.OO FOR A share:. 






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AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 



FOUR CHAIRS. 



170 LONG WAITS. 



Mon., 7 A. M.-8 P. M. Thurs., 7 A. M.-6 P. M. 
Tues., 7 A. M.-6 P. M. Fri., 7 A. M.-8 P. M. 

Wed.. 7 A. M.-8 P. M. Sat., 7 A. M.-ll P. M. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITUREjlND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLKTK LINE OF OOOD8 
SUITED TO THK STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, PillowB, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1861. 

EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTEBB AND MANUFACTUHKItB OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

■A-SSAY GOODS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



VISIT MY 



New Art Store, 

189 Main Street, 

Northampton, Mass! 

Store and Basement devoted entirely to Picture Framing 
We are Specialists In this line. 




DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $8.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

IIOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER 6 CO. 



fflassaehusetts Agricultural College. 
FARM DEPARTMENT. 

FRENCH COACH AND PERGHERON 




A SPECIALTY. 
For particulars address, 

E B. FORBISTALL, Supt., Ajfnun, Mass. 



rtlMtt$, 



AMHftsf , t\m. 



I 



^KTHE* 



flfoassacbusetts 
BQricultural 

(Lollcae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



l- SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Shout Wintkk Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must he at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No cutrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 



(h) A Shokt Course in Bee Cultukk. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



I. A FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on ct-rtificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 






3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. BurfUWALD, Amherst, Mass. 



f- < 




n 



S 



#£* 



THE COLLEGE SIGSAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 2 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 16. 1907 



This space reserved for 
THE FARM DEPARTMENT, 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLXOS, 

E. H. Forristall, Supt., 
Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



l£»t«-*»»» *•**»**** 1 *"»*•*. 




Waterman's ^Fountain Pen 

always at hand because the Clip-Cap 
keeps it securely in the pocket ; always 
ready for work because the spoon feed 
keeps the right amount of ink at the 
point of the pen for the very first 
stroke; always Mowing until the last 
drop of ink in the peo is exhausted; 
never over-flowing because of its sim- 
ple, common-sense construction; never 
skipping; never making any sort of 
trouble ; Waterman's Ideal is indis- 
pensable in the lecture room and ex- 
amination room, in the study, on tin- 
car, anywhert. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 

STORE 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Et'ne Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, IWAMDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS PILLED. 



GO TO... 



Page's Sboe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Costs but $i per $100 worth for three years in 
any college building, Policies issued while you wait. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings Dank Dlock, - AMHERST. 



C. E. EWELL 



SUCCESSOR TO 



E. R. CLARK & CO 



We have a full line of College Stationery and Supplies. 
Also Daily and Sunday Papers and Magazines. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



STUDENTS ATTENTION! 



/. M. LABROV/TZ 

TAILOR AND PRESSER 






Suits and Overcoats to Order. All goods of the best Material, and to be tailored 

in the best style. 

Imported and Domestic Goods. Full Dress Suits to rent. Students Clothes 

Bought, Highest Price Paid. 

Tickets for Pressing 12 Pairs of Pants $1.50. 



Clothing pressed by term at regular price, payable in advance. Positively 

pressing on credit. 



no 



STORE 12 AMITY STREET. 



TELEPHONE. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., OCTOBER 16, 1907 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

notify the Business Manager _ — ■ — 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R, H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Assistant Ed'tor. 

O B BR1CGS. 1 909. Assistant Business Manager. 

0. B. BR1GCS, 1909, Alumni Notes. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. ^^ ^ 

j. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletics. DAMON. 1910. 

H. T. WHEELER. .908, College Notes. J £ DAMON. 1910 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 



T.rm.= fl.00 per ,..r in — — »-» C-^ io«. "—a- •"«•»" •• "■»« *«" ' nd C — d> - *Jt^t- 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Athletic Association. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
Co' lege Senate. 



Prof 



S. F. Howard, Sec. 
K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager- 
K. E. Gillett. President. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index, 
Y. M. C A. 

Musical Association. 



J. R.Parker , Pres. 
R. D. Lul'. Manager. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
C. H Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-clsss matter. Port Office at Amherst. 

mmmnm * mamma** «*»^ 



Editorials. 



~ The editor regrets that space has not allowed a full 
account In this issue of the happenings of the Rural 
Progress Conference. An account of the dedication 
of Clark Hall will appear in the next issue of the 
Signal, together with sundry other good things which 
should appear in the present issue, 

The Business Manager wants to see every student 
of the college subscribing to the college paper this 
year. This means you— freshman, sophomore, jun- 
ior and senior. Don't wait to be dunned for your 
subscription, but pay it as promptly as possible. 
Support the paper as you do your athletics and make 
this year the most successful in all the activities ot 
college life. To the alumni we would make a most 
urgent appeal, for it is their support and their con- 
tinued interest in the college that will insure our 
future growth and prosperity. Send in your names 
for the Signal mailing list and keep in touch with 
your Alma Mater, and the undergraduate life of the 
college. 



"Among all the educational institutions of this Com- 
monwealth, the Massachusetts Agricultural college is 
about to take the lead in the matter of special events. 
Beginning Wednesday and closing Saturday, it will 
have under its immediate auspices a "Conference on 
Rural Progress," in which will participate many well- 
known representatives of the agricultural, civic, 
sociological, literary, educational and religious organi- 
zations of the State. The programme is broad and 
comprehensive, but its most inspiring feature is its 
progressiveness. In a way the conference will cele- 
brate the fortieth anniversary of the existence of the 
college for actual work, but the reminiscent part of 
the exercises, interesting as that is sure to be, will be 
subordinated to consideration of vital and up-to-date 
questions. Outlook, not retrospection, will be its 
characteristic, and the phases of rural interest that 
will be presented and discussed will thoroughly cover 

the ground. 

This event should have the result of calling special 
attention to our State college and awakening a new 
interest in its welfare. It has had to make its way 



r,t _- 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



up to its present high standard of excellence and ser- 
vice against many obstacles and discouragements. 
There has been misapprehension of its purpose and 
prejudice born of that misapprehension, but happily it 
Is now coming to be better understood and more 
generally appreciated. It is a bigger and broader 
institution than ever before. Its alumni need not fear 
comparison with those of any other. In fact, they fill 
a place In our social and economic order that they 
could hardly have been as well prepared to fill any- 
where else. But that is not all for which the Com- 
momwealth is its debtor. It does not rest upon Its 
restricted academic laurels but has carried its influence 
and its service far afield and has identified itself with 
some of the most vital interests of the State. 

The men who are today at the head of its affairs 
are of modern ideals and large enthusiasms. They 
are ready and anxious to make the service of the col- 
lege as broad as possible. It all depends upon the 
corporation of the state and her people, and that 
depends upon their estimate of its value. We should 
remember that it stands in the same relation to Mass- 
achusetts that the Western institutions stand to the 
States in which they are located. We can hardly 
expect the millions to be appropriated that are con- 
sidered so good investment in the Middle West, but 
it will be short-sighted policy to withhold liberal treat- 
ment. The college has given a good account of its 
stewardship, and we have full faith that in the future 
it will prove one of the State's finest assets and most 
profitable investments. ''—Boston Transcript, Sept. 
30, 1907. 



Athletic Notts- 



The football team is coming even stronger than 
was expected at the first of the season and it now 
looks as if the scores of 1907 might well replace 
those of 1901 upon the backstop. Coach Bullock 
has a knack of making the men work for all that is in 
them, and the results of this work were seen in the 
first three games. Captain Cobb's fine punting and 
drop-kicking have been highly praised in many of the 
newspapers and the good showing the team has made 
thus far is due in no small measure to him. 



Brown, 5; M. A. C, 0. 

The football team went down to Providence, Oct. 
2, and threw a big scare into the Brown camp. 
Brown managed to win out, but only after the hardest 
kind of a fight. Brown started In with a rush, get- 
ting the ball on her own 40-yard line and by a bril- 
liant series of end runs and line bucks carrying it 
down the field and over the line for the touchdown. 
The ball then see sawed back and forth for a short 
period, Cobb's superb punting making a show of the 
feeble kicks of the Brown punter. Brown soon made 
another determined bid for a score and pushed the 
ball into the shade of the Massachusetts goal. M. 
A. C. braced at this point, the line held like a stone 
wall and Brown lost the ball. In the second half M. 
A. C. outplayed Brown, threatening to score three 
times while Brown was dangerous only once. 

Captain Cobb contributed features in his punting as 
well as his running back punts. Although he failed 
three times to place the ball between posts by drop- 
kicks, only once was he inside the 30-yard line. 
Both Roberts and Morgan put up good exhibitions in 
the back field and Farley opened up some good-sized 
holes in the line. 

The line-up : 



BROWN. 

Pryor (capt.) I. e. 
Kirley. 1. t. 
Cobb, 1. g. 
Seidler, c. 
Ayler, r. g. 
Hazard, r. t. 
Houiss, r. e 
Dennie. q. b. 
Mayhew. 1. h. 
Smith (Alger), r. h. 
Bushnell. f. b. 



M. A. C. 

r. e.. Grossman 

r. t., Sexton 

r. g.. Willis 

c. Paige 

I. g.. Anderson (Crosby) 

I. t.. Farley 

I. e.. Turner 

q. b., Cobb (capt ) 

1. h., Roberts 

r. h., Morgan 



f. b., Schermerhorn 
Score— Brown 5, M. A. C. 0. Touchdown — Bushnell, 
Brown. Referee— Murphy of Harvard. Umpire— Collins 
of Harvard. Head linesman — Hunt of Brown. 

M. A. C, 11 ; Rhode Island, 0. 

M. A. C. defeated Rhode Island Oct. 5 in a 
loosely played game. It was expected that the home 
team would run up quite a large score but Rhode 
Island proved unexpectedly strong on the defense and 
did not allow a score to be made in the first half. 
In the second half Massachusetts by dint of hard work 
managed to score two touchdowns, one after a series 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 



of brilliant runs by Roberts and the other by a line 
plunge by Willis. 

Cobb started the game by kicking off to Bacon. 
Rhode Island failed to make 10 yards in two downs 
and Bacon punted, the ball going outside at Rhode 
Island's 30-yard line. Roberts then made 20 yards 
but Morgan and Schermerhorn failed to advance It 
any in two tries and Captain Cobb tried for a field 
goal but failed. This was the nearest M. A. C. 
came to scoring in the first half. Rhode Island now 
braced and kept the ball near the center of the field 
for the rest of the half. 

The first score came after about five minutes' play 
in the second half. Roberts took the ball on Rhode 
Island's 40-yard line and made 10 yards twice on 
plays just outside of tackle and then 25 yards on a 
trick play. Morgan added 5 yard, Roberts 15 yards 
and on the next play was pushed over for a touch- 
down. Cobb failed to kick the goal. The second 
score came late in the half. Willis carried the ball 
over and Roberts kicked out to Cobb who kicked the 

goal. 

Time was taken out repeatedly for Rhode Island 
and only once for M. A. C. The forward pass and 
on-side kick were tried a number of times but with 
little success. 

The line-up \ 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Turner, 1. e. 
Anderson. Cash, 1. g. 
Paige, c. 
Willis, r. g. 
Sexton, Crosby, r. t. 
Crossman, r. e. 
Cobb. q. b. 
Roberts, 1. h. b. 
Morgan, Blaney. r. h. b 
Schermerhorn. f. b. 



RHODE ISLAND. 

r. e.. Drews 

r. g., Crandall 

c. Field 

1. g„ Warner 

1. t.. Whipple 

1. e.. Hayward 

q. b.. Mitchell 

r. h. b.. Craig 

1. h. b., Quinn 

f. b.. Bacon 



Score-Massachusetts 11. Rhode Island 0. Touchdowns 
—Roberts 2. Goal from touchdown— Cobb. Referee— 
Elrod of Brown. Umpire— Dr. Collins. Linesmen- 
Thompson and Crandall. Time— 20-minute halves. 

Dartmouth, 6 ; M. A. C, 0. 



(By our Special Reporter.) 

The team lined up against the heavy Dartmouth 

eleven Saturday on Alumni Oval at Hanover, and 

succeeded in holding them to a single touchdown and 

goal. The field was damp and slippery, thus handi- 



capping our lighter team, and affording a distinct ad- 
vantage to the wearers of the green. Only once was 
the Dartmouth goal In danger, when Cobb attempted 
a drop kick from the 30-yard line, which was blocked. 
Game in detail : 

1st half— Cobb kicked off to Saxton. By a series 
of plays around the ends and with line plunges by 
Marks, the ball was pushed down the field, A for- 
ward pass was nailed by Roberts. Massachusetts 
ball on her 20-yard line. Roberts gained 5 yards 
around end. Cobb punted to Dartmouth's 45-yard 
line. After two small gains Ingersoll punted to our 
20-yard line. On the next play Cobb punted the ball 
to the center of the field. By steady gains with In- 
gersoll and Marks plunging through tackles and cen- 
ter, the ball was worked to our 15-yard line. Here 
each team received a 5 yard penalty for offside. On 
the next play Stuart went around left end for a touch- 
down, Ingersoll kicking an easy goal. 

Dartmouth received kickoff and immediately punted 
to middle of field. Roberts made no gain. On a 
tackle around tackle play, Farley made a pretty 
plunge for a 5-yard gain. A forward pass put the 
ball on Dartmouth's 25-yard line. Here the green 
line held, and Cobb dropped back for a kick, but the 
ball was blocked, a Dartmouth man falling on it. A 
forward pass failed, and Dartmouth was penalized to 
her 15-yard line. For the rest of the half the ball 
was see-sawing back and forth, the Dartmouth backs 
proving themselves good ground gainers. The half 
ended with Massachusetts ball on her 20-yard line. 
Score: Dartmouth, 6; Mass., 0. 

2d half— Our team could not gain and punted. 
Dartmouth soon followed suit. Roberts could not 
gain and Cobb again punted, Pishon fumbling and 
Crossman getting the ball on Dartmouth's 37-yard 
line. Morgan gained three yards. Onside kick gave 
Dartmouth the ball on her 15-yard line. Ingersoll 
and Bankart carried the ball to our 50-yard line, and 
after being penalized punted to the centre of the field. 
After two small gains by Roberts and Morgan, Cobb 
punted over the heads of the Dartmouth backs to the 
10-yard line. With Stuart and Ingersoll going around 
our ends the ball was soon placed on our 15 -yard 
line. Here it was Mass', ball, first down. Cobb 
quickly punted to centre of field. After, no gain. 



Of 
12 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



«3 






Dartmouth punted and Roberts failed to nail the ball, 
a Dartmouth man getting It on our 10-yard line. 
Here, after two attempts to break th-ough our line, 
time was called. 



The line-up : 

DARTMOUTH. 

Kennedy. DeAngelis. 1. e 

H. Bankart, Pierce. 1. t. 

Thayer. 1. g. 

Brusse, c. 

Baldwin, r. g. 

Lang. r. t. 

Saxton, r. e. 

Pishon. q. b. 

Stuart, 1. h. b. 

Ingersoll, r. h. b. 

Marks, f. b. 

Score — Dartmouth 6, M 
Referee — Brown. Head 
Dr. Bolser. Time — 25 an 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

r. e., Crossman 
r. t.. Sexton 
r. g., Crosby 
c, Paige 
1. g., Anderson 
1. t.. Farley 
1. e.. Turner 
q. b., Cobb (capt.) 
r. h. b.. Morgan 
1. h. b.. Roberts 
f. b.. Shermerhorn 
assachusetts 0. Umpire— Clough. 
linesman— Craig. Field judge — 
d 20 minute halves. 



ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. 

On Wednesday, Oct. 2, the college celebrated its 
fortieth anniversary with appropriate exercises, many 
alumni and friends of the college being present at that 
time. The program included an address by Marquis 
F. Dickinson of Boston, a trustee of the college, his 
subject being "The Beginnings of College History," 
an address by William H. Bowker of the class of 71 
upon "The Old Guard and the Faculty of Four," and 
an address by Prof. William P. Brooks upon the 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. The 
speeches of Mr. Dickinson and Professor Brooks 
were mainly of a historical nature, sketching the 
growth of the college and experiment station respect- 
ively since the beginning of the agricultural movement. 
Mr. Bowker's address was more of a reminiscent 
nature, containing snatches of fact and story which 
will always be treasured away in the hearts and 
memories of many of the early graduates of the col- 
lege. Mr. Bowker's address was in part as follows, 
the account being taken from the Republican of Oct. 3 : 

The authorities of 40 years ago, the famous 
"faculty of four," were wise, farseeing men. They 
realized that a college could not start without students : 
and knew the advantage of a large entering class. 
Therefore, they probably decided to make the best of 
the situation, to take us all in for better or for worse, 
and to do the necessary weeding out later on. That 



they did not do much severe weeding is evidenced by 
the fact that the old guard, which entered with 56 
members, graduated with 27, — a larger proportion of 
the entering class than has since prevailed in this col- 
lege, or than usually prevails in other institutions. 
That the early method of admitting and retaining 
students in this institution, — that is, by natural selec- 
tion based on good looks rather than on scholarship, 
although scholarship counted at least 50 points in the 
scale, — was the best method, it is not for me to say, 
for modesty compels me to be silent ; but I point with 
pride to the fact that all of my classmates have met 
with reasonable success (not the mad Wall street 
kind) in their chosen fields, have kept square with the 
world, and, so far as heard from, have never been 
arrested except for "alleged" over-speeding on the 
public highways. 

The first catalog of the college records 56 students 
in the opening year, a board of trustees of 17 mem- 
bers, a board of overseers of 36 members, and a 
faculty of four members. That original and famous 
"faculty of four" consisted of William S. Clark, pres- 
ident and professor of botany and horticulture and 
director of the botanical gardens (then existing only 
on paper) ; Levi Stockbridge, farm superintendent 
and instructor in agriculture ; Ebenezer S. Snell, pro- 
fessor of mathematics ; and Henry H. Goodell, pro- 
fessor of modern languages and instructor in gym- 
nastics and military tactics. These four men, then 
in the prime of life, were the first teachers and lead- 
ers of the old guard. They were a well-balanced and 
inspiring team, equal to every emergency, and there 
were many of them in the early days. 

Clark hall, now competed and to be dedicated 
today to botanical training and research, is a fitting 
monument to the first active and aggressive president 
of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, who left In 
this state, as in Japan, where he founded the first 
agricultural college of that country, an enduring record 
in the cause of education. While Clark was the 
aggressive leader and undoubtedly the hero of the boys 
of my time, Stockbridge was the shrewd, level-headed 
man of the faculty, the balance-wheel, "the father 
confessor," the "ever-present help in the time of 
need." He, like Clark, had unbounded faith in the 
future of the college and in the good faith of the state 
toward it. 



The third important man in that first faculty Is our 
late, lovable Goodell,— a boy with us in '67; the 
general utility man of the faculty, teaching all the 
languages, modern (and ancient if necessary) besides 
gymnastics and military tactics ; also a monitor in the 
early days, the appointed guardian of our moral and 
physical welfare. He was an excellent disciplinarian, 
a splendid teacher, and a man looking for the good in 
everybody, which he invariably found and brought out. 
Great in his goodness of character and life, and of 
charming personality, he left a lasting impress on the 
annals of this institution. In speaking of the ' 'faculty 
of four," we must not pass by that dear, little, dried- 
up, sparkling professor of mathematics loaned us from 
Amherst college, Ebenezer Snell. He was with us 
but a year, but he taught mathematics so thoroughly 
and in such an interesting way that he influenced 
some of the brilliant men of the class to take up 
higher mathematics and eventually to become dis- 
tinguished engineers. He was as sweet in his life 
and example as he was great in his profession, but he 
had no use for a numskull in mathematics ; so some 
of us never got very close to him. 

Let it be understood that we hold in this institution 
that the study of agricultue, with all the sciences and 
arts which are related to it,— and what sciences and 
arts are not related to it ?— can be made a cultural as 
well as a vocational means of education ; that while it 
is well to know Greek and Latin and the great classics 
of literature, these are not absolutely essential to 
develop a useful and cultivated citizen. Let it also 
be known that while we have educated professional 
and business men, and shall continue to do so, the 
great majority of our graduates have taken up some 
form of agricultural work or some pursuit allied 
thereto. Thus have we fulfilled the mission of the 
institution, namely : "To promote the practical and 
liberal education in the several pursuits and profes- 
sions of life," and at the same time we have taught 
"such branches of learning as are related to 

agriculture." 

But we are often asked why we have not sent out 
more graduates ? There are many reasons. Forty 
years ago, if it took courage to become the president 
of this institution, as it did, it certainly took courage 
on the part of the young student to come and remain 
here when the tendency of the times, and in many 



cases, the home influence, was against it and in favor 
of classical education. Again, it must be remem- 
bered that this college is not a fashionable institution ; 
that it never has been and I hope it never will be. for 
when fashion touches a school or a college, or a 
church, for that matter, it usually ceases to be demo- 
cratic and becomes exclusive and moribund.— then its 
hour has struck and the janitor can put up the shutters, 
lock the door and go home. It must also be remem- 
bered that this college has never had as feeders, a 
certain great group of exclusive and inbred preparatory 
schools where a boy is enrolled at his birth. Further, 
the teachers of the high schools in our state have not 
been in full sympathy with us. for most of them are 
graduates of the old colleges, steeped in the old- 
school notions j and naturally they have influenced 
boys to go to their favorite institutions. Neither has 
the press been wholly in sympathy with us because its 
editors are largely college-bred men of the old type, 
and to this day some of the papers persist in printing 
our name in lower case. Even the agricultural 
press, at times, has been lukewarm ; and as for the 
farmers for whom the college was supposed to be 
established they have contributed, until recently, less 
than half the students. But what could we expect 
when the farmer himself, and his wife and daughter, 
discouraged at the outlook, have not wanted the son 
and brother to follow in the footsteps of the father? 
1 am reminded, by the circular announcing this 
conference, that while the historic and anniversary 
aspects will not be disregarded, "the outlook is toward 
the future." It is never safe to prophesy; but with 
the establishment of the normal department, which Is 
to be opened this fall for training teachers that they 
may introduce nature studies in the common schools 
of the state, particularly in the rural districts, and with 
the introduction of agricultural high schools, one of 
which has already been opened in Petersham. Mass- 
achusetts, we anticipate that much of the academic 
work which we now have to do will be eliminated, and 
that at no distant day we shall deal chiefly with the 
larger and higher educational problems, that men will 
do their academic work before they reach us and will 
come here for advanced training in the natural and 
applied sciences. Who knows but that one day we 
shall be a college for advanced or post-graduate work 
in all departments of education, and that Amherst 



M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



7 
•5 



I 



college, on yonder hill, will be a preparatory school 
for us ! 

But let me hasten to say that the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, and agricultural education 
In this state and in the nation, owe more to Amherst 
college than the public realizes. An examination of 
the records shows that in 1850 Dr. Hitchcock, then 
president of Amherst college, and Marshall P. Wilder 
then president of the state Senate, were commissioned 
to visit and study the agricultural institutions of 
Europe. Dr. Hitchcock wrote the report j and some 
of the recommendations, particularly in relation to 
agricultural schools, are as sound and useful today as 
they were when published 57 years ago. The first 
practical outcome of this investigation, chiefly carried 
on by Dr. Hitchcock, was the establishment of the 
board of agriculture, — the first to be founded in 
America, — which prepared the way for the agricul- 
tural college that was incorporated 14 years later. 

We must remember that while Amherst college 
gave us our two leading presidents, Clark and Goodell, 
yet that Dartmouth, Williams, and Brown each con- 
tributed a president, — in fact, that nearly all the well- 
known sources of scholarship and scientific training 
have contributed to the upbuilding of this Institution ; 
and we are proud to say that we are now able to 
reciprocate, to return in kind, and that we are sending 
our sons to be presidents and professors in other 
institutions. 

It has remained, however, for the Michigan Agri- 
cultural college, a sister institution, which has recently 
celebrated her 50th anniversary, to train for us our 
ninth and last president, Kenyon L. Butterfield, a 
grandson of a Vermont farmer who migrated to 
Michigan many years ago. He is one of our own 
kind, as it were, — one who, If not an alumnus, is an 
M. A. C. man. Born on a farm, brought up in a 
rural atmosphere, steeped in the belief that the trained 
mind should go with the trained hand, he comes to us 
a thorough convert to the idea that the study of agri- 
culture, in all its varied branches and with its historic 
and storied associations, can be made the channel of 
cultural as well as vocational training ; that a student 
trained under these influences, on a college farm, is 
more likely to seek and enjoy rural pursuits and a 
country life than one trained in the old school. 

He comes to us, at 38 years of age, out of the 



great, democratic, vigorous West, a return in kind of 
what the East has sent to the West, full of virility 
and hope, and with large vision of the future. He 
gives promise of being one of our most successful 
presidents. May his chief success lie in holding the 
college to the purpose for which it was founded for 
we believe that this college and all the other land 
grant colleges should strictly follow the provisions of 
the government act which created them, keeping 
agriculture, mechanic arts, manual labor, and military 
science well in the foreground, and that if they do so, 
these thoroughly democratic state institutions will be 
tremendous factors in the development and redemp- 
tion of this republic. 

/DEDICATION OF THE TROPHY ROOM. 

One of the principal features of the conference on 
rural progress held under the auspices of the College 
in commemoration of its opening forty years ago was 
the dedication of the trophy room by the students 
and alumni on the afternoon of Oct. 4. At 3-30 p. 
m. the students and alumni gathered at the Drill Hall 
to convey the old racing shell of the victorious crew 
of July 19, 1871 to the trophy-room in North Col- 
lege. The students formed in column of twos, the 
senior and junior classes preceding the boat while the 
other classes followed, the alumni bringing up the 
rear. The band led the march. The boat was 
borne upon the shoulders of students. The living 
members of the winning crew accompanied it on 
either side. In recognition of the missing member a 
knot of crepe was pinned to the boat. Upon reach- 
ing North College the shell was laid upon standards. 
Dr. Paige, chairman, introduced the first speaker, 
Gideon H. Allen, as "the first graduate of the col- 
lege." Herewith we present his speech. 

PRESENTATION OF THE OLD SHELL. 

Thirty-seven years ago, in the year 1870, the 
junior year of the pioneer class of 1871, the rowing 
sport was inaugurated in this institution by the organ- 
ization of a rowing association with Arthur D. Nor- 
cross of '7 1 as president and William R. Peabody 
of '72 as commodore. Arrangements were at once 
made for a race between this and Amherst college, 
which institution took up the sport the previous sea- 
son. A crew was selected to represent M. A. C. as 



/', 



follows : Edward Hardy a special student, of Boston, 
bow oarsman and captain ; Henry B. Simpson, '73, 
Hudson, N. P., No. 2; George Leonard, 71, New 
Bedford, No. 3; Gideon H. Allen, 71, Marion, No. 
4; George A. Duncan, 74, Keene, N. H., No. 5; 
Fred C. Eldred, 73, Sandwich, No. 6 and stroke. 
This contest was held at Hatfield on the Connecticut 
river where were the boathouses of the two colleges, 
and resulted in a victory for the M. A. C. crew. 
The course was a three mile one, but laid out for a 
turn stake race, one and a half miles down stream 
and return. The time made by the winning crew 
was 19 minutes and 59 seconds which was accounted 
good time for such a race. The boat used was an 
old one, purchased from a boat club in Springfield, 
and discarded some time before by the Yale college 
rowing association. Her dimensions were 39 ft. in 
length, 22 inches in width, 9 inches in depth, and 
weight 140 or 150 pounds; a very fair boat for a 
turnstake race because of her easy turning qualities, 
but not so well suited for a straight-away race. Indi- 
vidual prizes were awarded the winning crew, consist- 
ing of pins fashioned of small crossed gold oars. 
The result of this victory was to stimulate the ambi- 
tion not only of the victorious crew, but of all the 
college including both students and faculty, and when 
a convention of colleges was called in the early part 
of the following year for the purpose of forming a 
rowing association of all American colleges, this 
institution sent delegates and became a member of the 
association thus formed. That convention arranged 
for a regatta to be held at Ingleside above Springfield 
on the Connecticut on July 19th of that year, 1871, 
and It was decided by the M. A. C. association to 
enter a crew for that contest and preparations were at 
once begun. The success of the crew in the Hat- 
field race of the previous fall, made its members the 
natural selection of the association for the new crew, 
but Hardy having left college and Duncan having 
withdrawn from the field, a crew was made up as fol- 
lows : Leonard, 71, Bow and captain ; A. D. Nor- 
cross, 71, No. 2 ; Simpson, 73, No. 3 ; Allen, 7 1 , 
No. 4; Frederick M. Somers, 72, No 5, and 
Eldred, 73, No. 6 and stroke as before; Norcross 
and Somers being the new men taking the places of 
Hardy and Duncan of the first crew. The crew 
had some preliminary practice on improvised rowing 



weights in the old laboratory building, and as soon as 
the weather would permit began outdoor practice in 
rowing and running. The distance of the river from 
the college grounds rendered practice considerably 
inconvenient and laborious, and might have discour- 
aged less determined devotees of the sport. But our 
crew went into the contest with the determination to 
and allowed no obstacle to hinder it in Its pur- 



win, 

pose. Practice on the water was held at first on 
Saturday afternoons, the half holiday, when the crew 
walked the three miles to the river, had its practice 
in the boat, then a run home again by a round-about 
way around Mt. Warner, across country to North 
Amherst, thence to the highway to the college. As 
the season advanced practice was held more frequent- 
ly, especially as the time of the regatta approached, 
until ten days prior thereto the crew took up quarters 
at the course at Ingleside and devoted its whole time 
to training and practice, with Old Josh Ward, as he 
was called, of the famous Ward Brothers oarsmen as 

coach. 

The financial condition of the association would not 
permit of the purchase of a new shell for this race as 
was desired and needed, so another second hand one 
was purchased of the Amherst college roving associa- 
tion, which did not enter a crew in this contest. This 
boat was built for and used by the Amherst freshman 
crew in the race on lake Quinsigamond at Worcester 
the year previous. Although a second-hand shell, It 
was in good condition and proved a good racing boat 
except for being somewhat hard to steer ; cranky, as 
boatmen say. Her dimensions were 50 feet in length, 
19 inches in width, 14 Inches In depth and weight 

130 pounds. 

Although this regatta was open to entry by any 
American college belonging to the association that 
might desire to be represented in the race by a crew, 
the only other entries for the university race beside 
M. A. C. were Harvard and Brown universities. 

It was deemed by the older colleges not a little 
presumptuous on the part of M. A. C. in entering this 
contest, and the attitude of the other crews toward 
ours took on at times a somewhat patronizing, not to 
say contemptuous air. But we went quietly though 
determinedly forward with our preparations for the 
contest, bound to prove our ability to back up our 
presumptions, and to force recognition of our worthl- 



16 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ness as a contestant with all institutions. However, 
in the many predictions as to the probable result of the 
contest made prior to the race, our crew received 
scant recognition ; but when the trial came M. A. C. 
proved an easy victor and the other crews received 
less consideration after the race than ours did before 
it. Not only was M. A. C. an easy victor, but the 
time made by her crew in this contest was the fastest 
ever recorded by a six-oared crew viz: — 16 minutes 
and 46 1-2 seconds. The victory was followed by a 
wild outburst of rejoicing by M. A. C. students and 
friends. Everybody seemed to rejoice with us. The 
newspapers were most generous in their accounts of 
the race, with praise for our college, and the fame ot 
M. A. C. was for a time on every tongue. 

The old shell in which this notable victory was 
achieved, has undergone many changes, having been 
badly crushed by the collapse of the boathouse some 
years after the race, and narrowly escaping distruction 
by fire at the burning of old South college some years 
ago, where she lay in the college museum, and lying 
stored since in her broken condition on the roof beams 
of the Drill shed, has finally been brought out and 
repaired, restoring it as nearly as possible to its 
original condition. And we members of the old crew 
— all but one of whom have survived these many years 
— have gathered here again — our first reunion since 
the memorable event, to bear the restored shell to its 
new resting place in the room prepared for the recep- 
tion and keeping of all trophies of college athletic 
victories. 

And now, speaking for the crew, I present to you, 
as representative of the college athletic association, 
this restored shell to be appropriately inscribed and 
committed to the custody of your association, perpetu- 
ated as it will be by successive classes, for safe keep- 
ing and protection as a memorial of that great victory 
of the college in its early days, and as an object of 
inspiration to present and future students, to the high- 
est possible achievement in all fields or branches of 
athletic sports. And not in athletics alone, but in 
scholarship as well, for the same spirit of devotedness 
and determination which leads to success in physical 
effort, must needs imbue the mind and the heart, of 
the student who would excel in the field of mental 
endeavor. 

The boat was then placed in the trophy room where 



it hangs suspended from the ceiling.^br. Paige then 
called for Archie H. Kirkland. '94, to present other 
athletic trophies to the college. Mr. Kirkland was 
not present so Prof. E. A, White, '95, responded as 
follows : 

Fellow-students, Friends of M. A. C: — As 
a member of the class of '95 I am very glad to 
have a part in the presentation of these athletic tro- 
phies to the trophy room of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College. I feel, however, embarassed 
because of the fact that I never have been an athlete 
and never expect to be. This has always been a 
keen regret to me. The only events requiring 
muscle and brains in which it was my privilege to 
participate during my college days were the class 
rushes and class football practice. Nevertheless, I 
have always had and always shall have the greatest 
interest in all college sports. 

I believe the feeling of class rivalry is a good 
incentive to strong college spirit and that athletics 
develop a man mentally, morally and physically. A 
man, physically strong, is to be admired and while the 
little man often has a wonderful brain development, 
athletics make the strong man, the ready man, the 
all-round man. Intercollegiate games arouse college 
spirit and I hope enough interest may be created by 
this trophy room so that each year we may have a 
field day when different classes will compete for the 
honor of having their numerals on the college banner. 
It, therefore, gives me great pleasure to present to 
the Trophy Room of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College this banner bearing the numerals of '94, '95. 
'96, '98 and '01. 

But class and college spirit in athletics is not 
enough ; both are excellent. The broadening influ- 
ence, however, is the feeling of brotherhood and 
good-will which exists between students of different 
educational institutions. Nothing binds these institu- 
tions in stronger bonds than general interest in ath- 
letics. In 1899 a dual meet was held with Williston, 
and M. A. C. won the banner. Students, I am glad 
to give this banner into your keeping today. Take it 
and bring to the trophy room many more like it. 

In behalf of the students, college senate and ath- 
letic organizations, Kenneth Gillett '08, president of 
senate and manager of the football team, accepted 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



»7 



the trophies in an apt speech that represented truly 
college sentiment. 

President Kenyon L. Butterfeld closed the speak- 
ing in words of the following import : 

TROPHY-ROOM SPEECH. 

The trophy-room v ought to mean a good deal to 
alumni and former students, I am sure that a man 
must possess a dead soul whose heart did not beat 
faster while Mr. Allen was escribing that famous vic- 
tory on the Connecticut. Every man in College in 
those days, and every man since who knows anything 
about the race, will certainly take pride in this trophy- 
room and in this boat, now so placed that all can see 
this memento of the splendid victory. As the years 
come and go other trophies will be placed here, and 
men will come back and seek first the trophy- room, 
because there they will find those things which remind 
them of old companionships, deep college joys, and 
the reminders of M. A. C. prowess. 

To the men now here the trophy-room ought to be 
meaningful. Here is a rallying place, here are the 
reminders of the early days which you know about 
only as the older men tell you of them. Here is an 
opportunity for you to contribute your share to these 
memories and to these victories. All these things 
should be an incentive to bring the men together, to 
inspire them to uphold the honor of the College, to 
win honorable victories for us. 

In another way the trophy-room is significant. It 
has been brought about through the co-operation of 
the College, — the alumni and the student body. All 
have contributed something, all have had a part in it 
and if it means anything, it means that for the future 
there is to be a closer union between all those who 
are in any way interested in the College, — the public, 
the Trustees, the Faculty, the alumni, the student 
body. 

Perhaps more important than all, the trophy-room 
to my mind is significant because it is only the begin- 
ning of still greater things. For the present it may 
serve the purpose of a social gathering place, but as 
soon as possible we must have an " M. A. C. Union," 
a general social center, the hearthstone of the Col- 
lege, a gathering place for all those who love M. A C, 
a place where differences of age, differences of class, 
differences of fraternity shall be buried in one splendid 
spirit of devotion to the College. 



The singing of "Sons of Old Mass'chusetts" com- 
pleted the program. 

The trophy room occupies the same position in 
North College as the old reading-room but what a 
transformation ! The untidy and wholly inhospitable 
lounging-room was stripped of its movables. Even 
the windows were replaced with larger lights and a 
hard-wood floor laid. The walls were painted, and a 
red burlap wainscot surmounted by a chair- rail 
covers the lower part. Tables, bookcase and a vari- 
ety of chairs in quantity, in Mission style, furnish the 
room. Pictures of past athletic teams adorn the 
walls. The bell that has rung out many a victory in 
the past from the turret on the chemical laboratory 
now rests here. In general the room presents an 
attractive, restful, homelike appearance ; it possesses 
an atmosphere of tone and refinement that draws one 
there unconsciously. Let us enter it and move 
therein in this spirit. 



Colleg? N°*t*$. 



— E. J. Burke, 1910, has been placed upon the 
Informal Committee. 

H. L. White, '09, has been elected to the Sig- 
nal Board, and has been appointed assistant editor. 
The Y. M. C. A. meeting, Oct. 10, was addressed 
by Mr. Cheney, treasurer of the Springfield Training 
School. 

— The Sunday chapel services, Oct. 13, were con- 
ducted by Rev. Mr. Estabrook, pastor of the Second 
Congregational church, East Amherst. 

— Two fine new plane-tables with telescope alidades, 
made from Prof. Waugh's own specifications, have 
been added to the equipment of the landscape garden- 
ing department. 

— The Sunday morning chapel services, Oct. 6, 
were led by Rev. Wilbert F. Anderson, pastor of the 
First Congregational church at Amherst. Special 
music was provided for the exercises. 

— Senior class elections : President, T. A. Barry ; 
vice-president, H. K.Hayes; secretary and treas- 
urer, S. L. Davenport; class captain, C. C. Gowdy ; 
sergeant-at-arms, F. A. Johnston ; historian, D. P. 
Miller. 



.8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



— The senior class in floriculture took a trip to 
Springfield Sept. 30, visiting first the greenhouses 
and ground of Mount Holyoke College and afterwards 
Adam's nurseries and Forest Park, Springfield. 

— Junior class elections : President, S. S. Cross- 
man ; vice-president, H. W. Turner; secretary, G. 
M. Brown; treasurer, R. D. Lull; sergeant-at-arms, 
J. V. Monahan ; class captain, H. P. Crosby; his- 
torian, O. B. Briggs. 

—Sophomore class elections : President, W. E. 
Leonard: vice-president, H.A.Brooks; secretary 
and treasurer, L. S. Dickinson ; class captain, Louis 
Brandt ; sergeant-at-arms, F. L. Thomas ; historian, 
Miss Marjorie W. Lambert. 

—The class of 1910 has elected W. R. Clarke as 
editor-in-chief of the 1910 Index, and F. T. Haynes 
as business manager. The editor and business man- 
ager are given power to choose the remaining mem- 
bers of the 1910 Index board. 

— The Recess Committee of the Ways and Means 
Committees of both houses of the State Legislature 
visited college Wednesday, Oct. 9. The visit was 
one of inspection, and the visitors, some 12 or 15 in 
number, were escorted about the college grounds by 
members of the faculty and of the board of Trustees. 

— An informal dance was held in the drill hall Satur- 
day night, Oct. 5, about 40 couples attending. 
Music was furnished by Derrick's Westfield orchestra. 
The hall was tastily decorated as usual with banners 
and plants from the Durfee plant-houses. Lunch 
at intermission was served at the drill hall, Mrs.Rowe 
of Draper hall catering. The patronesses were Mrs. 
Butterfield, Mrs. Ostrander, Mrs. Wellington, all of 
Amherst, and Miss Wood of Smith college and Miss 
Reeves of Mount Holyoke college. Dancing began 
at 5, immediately after the game with Rhode Island, 
and continued until 9. There were 18 dances and 
one extra upon the program, with intermission after 
the ninth dance. 



Dtp&rtmtrvtr ^lo-t?s. 



'95, —Married June 26th, at Brooklyn, N. Y., 
Miss Mary Frederica Harrison to Walter Levi Morse. 
Mr. Morse is terminal engineer N, Y, C. & H. R. 
R. R. Address 335 Madison Ave., New York city, 

'95. _ A. F. Burgess, Bureau of Entomology, 
Washington, D. C, Entomologist. Residence 1358 
Newton St., N. W. 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
The juniors in landscape gardening indulged in an 
interesting exercise the other day in the way of com 
petition in stadia reading. The class was divided into 
two squads, under Captains Cutler and Neale respect- 
ively. Captain Cutler's squad showed an average 
error of 0.303 per cent, on distances under 300 feet, 
while Capt. Neale's squad won by reducing the error 
to 0.283 per cent. This is considered good work for 
green hands. 

A set of type solids has been added to the equip- 
ment of the drawing room. Also a considerable num- 
ber of plaster casts. These will be of special value 
to the classes in freehand drawing. 
ENTOMOLOGY. 
Laboratory work in this subject has commenced. 
The senior students in Entomology are being tested 
for color-blindness, as the correct perception of color 
is of much weight in the description of determination 
of species of insects. 

Dr. Fernald and J.N. Summers have published 
recently, in the Entomological News, an article upon 
"The Early Stages of the Oriental Moth." 
EXPERIMENT STATION. 
Mr. Henri Haskins has gone to Jamestown to 
attend the meetings of the American Association of 
Official Agricultural Chemists. 

POMOLOGY. 
The class in systematic pomology is beginning to 
get the benefit of fruit grown in all parts of the coun- 
try. Exchanges have been arranged as usual with 
fruit growers and teachers of pomology, and shipments 
are now coming in from Maryland, Ontario, New 
York and many other points. 

Mr. J. K. Shaw, graduate student, is making an 
interesting study of the cosmopolitan Ben Davis apple 
and its near relatives. By a new and specially accu- 
rate method he is studying the variation due to soil, 
climate, age of tree, individuality of tree and other 
factors. 

FLORICULTURE. 
Chrysanthemums are beginning to show bloom and 
the greenhouses look more cheerful. An unusually 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



•9 



fine stock of violet plants also gives promise of many 
hearts made glad in Northampton and South Hadley. 
The arboriculture class has been planting some 
fine collections of peonies and phlox. Tree study is 
also now under full swing. . 

Alumni. 



The Local Alumni Association is planning to 
hold a supper in Amherst immediately after the 
Amherst football game. 

72.— Henry Wells, aged 57, died at Jamestown, 
R. I., Sept, 19, 1907. He was a resident of Wash- 
ington, D. C, in the Real Estate and Insurance 
business. 

'73. _Henry A. Simpson, a member of the famous 
crew, and now a resident of Washington. D, D., has 
presented to the trophy room his rowing suit, consist- 
ing of trousers, shirt, belt, maroon silk head hand- 
kerchief, and a maroon and white rosette made by 
Roxanna Dickinson, a sister of Marquis F. Dickinson 
of the trustees. The silk handkerchiefs worn by the 
men were given to them by young ladies of Amherst. 



'96.— Edmond de Luce, 27 West 23d St, New 
York, Salesman. Residence Somerville, N.J. 

96. Frank L. Clapp, Cornwall-on-Hudson. N. 

Y.. Civil Engineer. Assistant Engineer Board of 
Water Supply of New York City. 

'98. Invitations have been issued for the marriage 

of Julian Styles Eaton, of Minneapolis, Minn., to 
Miss Ethelwynne Wyman on Saturday, Oct. 1 9th. 

•99. William H. Armstrong. First Lieutenant P. 

R. Regiment of Infantry, U. S. A., Henry Barracks, 
Cayley. Porto Rico. Lieutenant Armstrong has 
been engineering officer at every port since entering 

the army in 1901. 

'99.— Bernard H. Smith, 177 State St.. Boston. 
Chief of Food Inspection Laboratory, Bureau of 
Chemistry, U. S. Department of Agriculture. Res- 
idence 29 Lowden Ave., West Somerville. 

-00.— A. C. Monahan, Principal of Turners Falls 
High School, Turners Falls. 

'00. Howard Baker, care of Elliott & Co.. 

Duluth, Minn. Vetterinary Inspector in charge of 
station. 



AN ECONOMICAL STUDENT 

is not always a student of economics, but any student of an economical 
turn of mind will find the Pickwick Clothes Shop, the very best place 
in Amherst for the intelligent, satisfactory and profitable consideration of 
Clothes- -economics. 

Our exceptional facilities for providing our patrons with the very 
newest, correct creations in "Togs"-and the extremely modest prices 
that we are enabled to sell them at-will win us your goodwill and- 
patronage. Fresh arrivals weekly— Inspection invited. 



VUvfa^s Welcome-bUy or pot 



AmherHt House Block 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To tHT. your wole. Come to me foryour 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Be pairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OrroatTB Town Hall. 



Geo. F. Vester, Jr. 



TAILOR 

AND 

DRAPER 



485 Main Street, - SPRINGFIELO, MASS. 

TELEPHONE, 

JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All order! promptly attended to. 

Drop me n po-tnl and I will cull on you. 

Br** Full l>ress Suits to rent. *»-StudenU' Clothes bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amiikrst, Mass. 

GOODS FOR MEN 




C & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



■ 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

"TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 

AMIIKKST. MASS. 



Ralw's 3nn t 

OM South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB. DAT. 

When in " H»mp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY 



R. J. RAHAR. 



" For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



OLIVCR TYP£WMT€fi$, 

RIBBONS FOR ALL MAKES. 



ST ILL WELL GAS FIXTURES AND MANTLES 

MOTORCYCLES AND BICYCLES, 

HIGGIN'S DRAWING INKS. 



l^'vl'AII^ SIIOI'. 

I'repaaed to mend anythimg except umbrellas. 
K. A. THOMPSON, 

Hear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Gaps an dGotcns 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS^& VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , Nkw York. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 

It is a Natural Manure. 
<ir<><rs Areafi Vigorous. u<-<iio>y Plants ntt Mmt t t Dlttam 

l>R. uK.oltuK K. RONS. ProtaaaOf of Botany at the MlH. 
Agricultural College, Hint PTOfVMOr Ol I'liilit DtMateeattbe 

Hutch Kxpertmeat elation, Amherst, Muss, writes to our 

Agril iiHuiiil Expert us follow- 

" I will say that I consider the formula which you 
prepared lor Mr. Prasoott tad applied by him oa hla 
i.c.im vh9 eery effeetoal la controlling the asparagus 
mat. The applli at Ion of your formula and other fea- 
tures which were carried out In the management of 
these bed- coTivince me that tt constituted the beat 
ilenion.tratlon of the aoatrol ol asparagus rust which 
baa ever been maile In thin country." 
(.KM INK PERUVIAN GUAVO formed the basts of the 
al>o\ • mentioned formula. It was aaad on the asparagus bade 
of 0, W. PaaaOOTT., Concord, Maaa., the largest Individual 
grower of Asparagus >" New Kngland. We alao offer 

WK ALSO OKKKK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from New York. Boston, 
Maaa., and Charleston, 8. C- 

Our beautifully illustrated SO page book on " Plant Food 
Problems," is sent free of charge. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Hole Importers for V . H. of iieiiiiloe Peruvian <iuano, and 
Mail II fail nrera of tl i K li (irailf pert 1 1 Iters. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



Fine Ath letic Goods 

TENNIS, GOLF 
BASE BALL, 

.Jerseys, Sweaters. 



The 
Wright A- Ititaon 

CHAMPIONSHIP 
TENNIS, BALL, 

Send for Catalogue- 
Free. 




Wright & Ditson 

New York, Boston, Chicago. 
Providence. R. I., Cambridge, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic Mock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, CtBara Noted for its excellent 

Oyster Stew ami Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OK 

80DA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ala. Fountains charged to order 



Kivbk Stkkkt. 



Northampton, Mam 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POU/ERS, 
TME TAILOR, 

lias received theleteat fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in (Jciitlcnieu's Garments. Also does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Preying promptly done. 

j6p»Military Work a Specialty..^ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



OUR ICE GRFflM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 

BANANA SPLITS. 

M. B. KmGJV^ 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity ami Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 

M.A.C.A8H, H.:M.JI£1VIWI»0JW,»0< 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
«• «• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

J^fSATISFAOTION OUARANTEBD. «^ 

H. A. VTLKY, Manager. 

OFFICB : 

East Pleasant Street. 



Buy Yonr Candy, Soda, Botany Supplies, 
Stationery Banners, etc. 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORED 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



All over the World. 
The Nkw Boa skwino Machine Is being used in all 
i onntrles. It is the moat popular Sewino Machine In all parts of 
the world, and has established a reputation for Itself which la the 
envy of all others. Dealers everywhere 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



O. «. GATES, 13.I3.S. 

DEHTAli ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK AMHERST, MA88 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, - - ■ AMHERST. MASS 

OFFICK HODBS: 
3 TO 12 A., luff-, 1-30 TO 6 P». M- 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 

THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 




Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



High Grade Stationery, .• 
Stamping and Embossing. 

JEWELRY, CLOCK REPAIRING. 

Munic and Musical Merchandise. 



AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cara will leave Amherst for Northampton on the liour and 
half lu>ur from 6 3ti a. m. till lo.uo r. M. Sundays the first car 
will leave at H..V» A. M. 

Cars leave Northampton for Amherst on the hour ami half 
boar, from «. 30 a. m. t« II r. U. The last ear whIIs for plays at 
tin' \i-udeinv of Music and for the train from MprliiK'ield due 
to arrive til 11.03. 

special curs on application. 

Main orritK, Oreknkiri.d, Mam. 
.lohn A.TaKtjart, Supt. 

Northampton OTFIOB, M Main 8t. 
C. W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. 
Telephone, Northampton, 178-2. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amherct. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 8, 1900. 



Jeweler-F. W. ROBERTS-Optician 

197 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. ■., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. K. BENTLKT, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

Now ready for the Football Season, also suitabe 
for Informals. 

See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 



Akthuk E. Dorr. L. H. Tourtklottk. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

Wllol.K.HAI.K DEALERS AND WMBW IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

Hi«rh Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Comer North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO. 




TI1K I.AROKKT OOI.I.KCK KNflUAV- 
INO IIOISK IN TIIK WORLD. 

Works : 17 th Street&LehighAve. 

O PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 

J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARK, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 



Telephone Connection. 



AEHERST, MASS 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catnlogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



J. H.TROTT 



PLUPIBER, STEP & 6HS FITTER. 

HHD DEALER III STOVES AND MIKES. 



EtaOf ii 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst Mouse Will Receive Prompt Attention. 




. M. BOLLES 

DIALER IN 

IABLE FOOTWEAR 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE COLLEGE TRADE. 



Sole local agents for the following well known lines of shoes. 



Slater & Morrill 

High Grade College Shoes 
$5.00 to $8.00. 




The Stetson Shoe 

Bench Made 

$5.O0 to $8.00. 



$3.50 9 $4.00, $5.00 

See Our Special Window Display of College Footwear. :: Fine Repairing a Specialty, all hand work. 

E. M. BOLLES 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ff 



























TOOTH BRUSHES 

All Styles and Prices. The Florence Prophylactic Tooth Brush at 25c. 




Military Brushes in great variety and all prices including the Prophylactic Military 

Brushes which can be boiled. 




I have received for Fall trade the best line of Hair Brushes which I have ever had. 




A large variety of Hand and Nail Brushes, Shaving Brushes and Whisk Brooms. 



DE^UEIVS DRUG STORE 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
HEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AMI> MAKUKACTUBEK8 OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY O-OOJDS. 



VISIT MY 



New Art Store, 

189 Main Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

store antl Basement devoted entirely to Picture Framing. 
We are Specialists in this line. 




We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath 11.00, 11.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



LET .... 

"BILL' 

PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. TURNER. 

CLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



CttWtffc & Aowhou$«, 



fkIMm 



AttHasr , Aa$$ # 



TH 



«— «*3* 



tlfoassacbusette 
HQricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenyon L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIfflAL 



VOL.. 18 



NO. 3 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. OCTOBER 30. 1907 



This space reserved for 
THE FARM DEPARTMENT, 

MSSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE, 

E. H. Forristall, Supt., 
Amherst, Mass. 




Waterman's 



Tt»* pwn with 



i Fountain Pen 

lha Cllp-C_p 



always at hand because the Clip-Cap 
keeps it securely in the pocket ; always 
ready for work because the spoon feed 
keeps the right amount of ink at the 
point of the pen for the very first 
stroke ; always flowing until the last 
drop of ink in the pea is exhausted; 
never over-flowing because of its sim- 
ple, -ommon-sense construction; never 
skipping; never making any sort of 
trouble; Waterman's Ideal is indis- 
pensable in the lecture room and ex- 
amination room, in the study, on the 
car, anywhere. 



DEUEL'S 
DRUG 

STORE 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 
GO TO .... 

Page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Costs but $i per $100 worth for three years in 
any college building, Policies issued while you wait. 



W. R. BROWN 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XV1I1. 



AMHERST. MASS., OCTOBER 30. 1907 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural Coilegs. 
Students and Ahimni »re requested to contribute. Cemmun lest tons should be sddressed. Collsgb Sional. Amhikst, Mass. The Siohal will be 
sent to »ll subscribers until Its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Assistant Ed tor. 

O. B. BR1CCS. 1909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. O. B. BRIGGS. 1909. Alumni Notes, 
j. R. PARKER, 1908, Athletics. W. E. ADAMS, 1909. Special. 
H. T. WHEELER. 1908. College Notes. E- *- DAMON, 1910. 
C. H. WHITE. 1909. Speclsl. W.R.CLARK. 1910. 



Terms: fl.OO per near in ndesnee. Single Copies. IOc. Postage ontside ol United Ststss and Csnsda, 8>c. sxtrs. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Association. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 
College Senate, 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 

K. E. Gillett. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager. 
K. E. Gillett. President. 



Fraternity Conference, 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 
Nineteen Hundred and Ten Index, 
Y. M. C A. 

Musical Association. 



J. R.Parker . Pres. 
R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 
F. T. Haynes, Manager. 
C. H. White. Prea. 
G. H. Chapman, Manager. 



Entered as second-cUss matter. Post Office at Amherst. 



Edrtbri&ls. 



Savings Bank Block, 



AMHERST. 



For some reason the cheering and singing of the 
student body this year is not as good as usual. It is 
not because the students lack enthusiasm, for the 
spirit of college brotherhood and rivalry is fine this 
year. It is not because of any fault or lack of effort 
upon the part of the cheer leaders. It is rather 
because, in scrimmage or 'varsity game, the men on 
the side lines are so intensely interested in the play- 
ing on the field that they forget or refuse to give 
attention enough to the cheer leaders to make a cred- 
itable showing with song and yell. No matter how 
able your cheer leaders may be, they are perfectly 
powerless before a bunch of excited rooters who defy 
all calls to cheer and sing together. It takes more 
of a man upon the sidelines to compel his eyes from 
the play and watch and follow the cheer lead3rs 
than it takes to follow the play of a good team with 
Interest and enthusiasm. Anybody can do the latter, 
but it takes men with a sense of duty and loyalty to 



do the former. The team on the field needs our 
loyalty as expressed by good cheering and singing. 
Are we going to give them half-hearted yells and 
singing which disgraces the name of music? — Now, 
then, let's steady down for the remaining games of 
the season. The spirit is all right— send It In the 
proper direction. 



Athletic Noi*s- 



With only three more games to be played it looks 
as if the football season of 1907 would equal If not 
surpass the season of 1906, 1905, and even 1904 
The team thus far has scored a total of 54 points 
against 2 1 by their opponents and has won three out 
of six games played, But while it is good to be satis- 
fied with the splendid showing made by the team thus 
far all realize that the three most Important games 
on the schedule are yet to come and the success of 
the season of 1907 will be in a great measure deter 
mined by the success in these three games. It is not 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






impossible to win all three games and to do it should 
be the ambition of every man on the team and to 
every member of the student body. With this end in 
view let us therefore forget any little differences we 
may have, let the men on the team forget self and 
pull together as a whole, and lastly let every man in 
the student body support the team by singing and 
cheering at the games and at practice and support the 
coach by refraining from criticizing a better judge- 
ment than their own. 

M. A. C, 29 ; Worcester Tech, 0. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College team 
defeated Worcester "Tech" in a one-sided and 
rather uninteresting game Saturday afternoon at 
Amherst. Massachusetts did not put its strongest 
team on the field and it did not need to, as the team 
with many of the positions filled by substitutes man- 
aged to roll up a total of 29 points, while "Tech" 
was never anywhere near the Massachusetts goal. 
"Tech" was very weak in the line and her backs 
failed to make any substantial gains. Only twice did 
"Tech" hold for downs, and made first down only 
once during the entire game. 

Worcester started the game at 2-15 by kicking off 
to Blaney. Massachusetts began a steady march for 
the goal line. Cobb helping out with a 45-yard run 
and Roberts with a 30-yard gain. Morgan made the 
touchdown and Cobb kicked the goal. "Tech" 
kicked off to Morgan and the ball was again carried 
down the field for a touchdown, Morgan taking it 
over. The third touchdown came after a 25-yard run 
by Roberts on a fake kick, a beautiful forward pass of 
25 yards by Cobb to Leonard, and two line plays that 
netted 16 yards, by Morgan. The half ended with 
the ball on "Tech's" 25-yard line. 

The second half opened with Cobb kicking over the 
"Tech" goal line. "Tech" kicked out from the 25- 
yard line and Cobb ran the ball back to the 35-yard 
line. Roberts made 13 yards. A forward pass was 
then tried. Paige got the ball and carried it over for 
a touchdown. Cobb kicked out to Roberts and then 
kicked the goal. A little later Roberts was pushed 
over for the fifth and last touchdown. Cobb kicked 
out to Roberts and then kicked the goal. Massachu- 
setts then put in six more second-string men and they 
were unable to score again, although the ball was 



kept in "Tech" territory until the end of the game, 
when it was on the "Tech" 10-yard line. 

Cobb played a good game for Massachusetts, kick- 
ing four goals out of five tries and sending off a num- 
ber of punts averaging over 40 yards. He made two 
pretty quarterback runs and passed the ball accurately 
on the forward pass. Crowther and Wagner played 
the best for "Tech." 

The line-up: — 

MASSACHUSETTS. WORCESTER "'TECH." 

Leonard, r. e 1. e.. Chapman 

Sexton, Johnson, r. t. 1. t.. Smith 

Schermerhorn. r. g. I. g.. Barlow 

Paige, c. c. Jacobs 

Anderson, Wheeler. 1. g. r. g., Gillett. Reiley 

Crosby, 1. t. r. t., Crowther 

Turner, Curran, 1. e. r. e., Crise 

Cobb, (capt). O'Donnel, q. b. q. b.. Bell 

Blaney. Daniels, r. h. b. I. h. b.. Wagner 

Roberts. Wellington. 1. h. b. r. h. b.. Halligan 

Morgan. Willis, f. b. f. b.. Herrick. 
Score — Massachusetts 29. Worcester "'Tech" 0. Umpire 

— Dr. Collins of Northampton. Referee — C. Donnelly. 
Head linesman — Barry. Timers — Allen and Rieley. Time 
— 20 and 15-minute halves. 

M. A. C, 10; Holy Cross, 5. 
[Special Report. ] 

It was a dissapolnted crowd of Holy Cross rooters 
that left Fitten field Saturday, Oct., 19, after the 
stinging defeat administered to the Holy Cross 
eleven by the M. A. C. football team. The disap- 
pointment was more keen because Holy Cross had 
made all preparation for an elaborate celebration in 
assurance of victory. The playing of the M. A. C. 
team was clean and fast, characterized for the most 
part by straight line playing and end plays, with but few 
attempts at the forward pass. Holy Cross played a 
slow but rough game, showing up but poorly in team 
work. Fumbling on both sides was frequent. Holy 
Cross tried to work the forward pass several times, 
but failed on each attempt. Frequent delays were 
caused by a disposition on the part of the Holy Cross 
players to "object" on every occasion which offered 
the slightest opportunity for referee Hehir to rule in 
favor of Holy Cross. The firm insistence of umpire 
Collins of Northampton was all that saved M, A. C. 
from absolute robbery. The two teams averaged 
about the same weight in the line, but behind the line 
the M. A. C. team was far lighter. 



Game in detail: 

1st half— Cobb received the kickoff for M. A. C, 
on the 25 yd. line, carrying the ball 3 yds. Roberts 
and Warner carried the ball for 7 yds. in 2 downs. 
Roberts fumbled, but Crosby recovered. A couple 
of small gains by line plunges, and Cobb punted, 
Sexton getting the ball on the 40 yd. line. Roberts 
took the ball in another rush, was tackled hard and 
fell on his head, dropping the ball, on the 45 yd. line, 
Holy Cross getting the ball. Roberts was cut on the 
left temple, but suffered most from a strained neck, 
After a gritty try to stay in the game , Roberts was 
taken out, and Blaney put in his place at right 
half. 

Holy Cross made 8 yds. by Knight on first down, 
but was thrown back for 2 yds. loss on second try. A 
forward pass to Driscoll netted but a few yds. gain, 
and Holy Cross, after a series of line plunges, punted 
to Cobb on the 23 yd. line. Cobb signaled for a fair 
catch, but was tackled before he touched the ball, 
and referee Hehir refused to penalize. Blaney and 
Morgan worked the ball back for a 15 yd. in 2 downs, 
after which Holy Cross held, and Cobb attempted to 
punt, but was blocked on the 48 yd. line. O'Donneil 
went around end for 10 yds, A forward pass fizzled, 
and the ball went offside to M. A. C. on her 46 yd. 

line. 

Farley circled end for 12 yds.; Holy Cross was 
offside and M. A. C. was given 10 yds. In the next 
three plays, Blaney made 35 yds., placing the ball on 
Holy Cross' 30 yd. line. Morgan added 9 yards on two 
trick plays, and the ball was given to Warner for 7 
yds. more in two plays. Blaney was given the ball for 
6 yds. more in two downs, and Warner broke through 
prettily for a touch-down. Cobb kicked out to Sexton 
on the 20 yd. line and kicked a pretty goal. M. A. 
C. 6, Holy Cross 0. 

Cobb kicked off to Jones who carried the ball with 
nice interference to the 35-yard line. Holy Cross 
fumbled to M. A. C. and Blaney was sent for a one 
yard game around end. Crossman fumbled and lost 
two yards. Cobb passed the ball forward, but Jones 
took it, and advanced 10 yards to Holy Cross 25- 
yard line. A few small gains and the ball went over 
to M. A. C. Time was called with the ball on Holy 
Cross 40-yard line. 



2nd half— Knight received Cobb's kickoff, and 
with good interference advanced the ball 30 yards to 
the 40-yard line. Holy Cross fumbled and for being 
offside was penalized three yatds. Burke took eight 
yards through the line, and Daly punted to Cobb on 
the 35 yard line. Crossman was taken out on 
account of a bad knee, and Leonard put in his place. 
Warner covered 14 yards on an end play, and 
Blaney added another five, placing the ball on M. 
A. C.'s 54 yard line. A tackle play with Farley was 
tried but failed. Blaney fumbled, the ball going to 
Holy Cross on the 30 yard line. On a silent signal, 
before the teams had lined up, Jones passed the ball 
forward to Driscoll, who sprinted down the field, 
closely followed by Morgan, but well surrounded with 
interference. Morgan made a good try at getting 
him on the 10 yard line, but was thrown off by inter- 
ference, and Driscoll scored for Holy Cross. Daly 
made a poor try at kicking the goal, the ball striking 
tne ground three yards from where it was kicked. 
M. A. C. 6, Holy Cross 5. 

Cobb kicked off to Knight on the goal line, the ball 
being advanced 10 yards. Driscoll circled left end 
for 36 yards, when he was downed by Warner 
breaking through interference from behind. Holy 
Cross made a few gains and was forced to punt to 
Cobb who signaled for a fair catch, but was tackled. 
M. A. C. was given 15 yards, Warner got through 
for 13 yards. Blaney faibd to gain, and Cobb punted to 
Jones on the 15 yard line. Jones advanced the ball 
8 yards, Holy Cross tried a forward pass, Tur- 
ner getting the ball In the air on Holy Cross 30 yard 
line. Blaney took the ball around end to the 10 
yard line, where Holy Cross held for small gains to 
the 4 1-2 yard line, the ball going over to Holy Cross. 
Daly punted to Cobb who was again tackled after sig- 
naling a fair cat-h. Referee Hehir was again partial 
to Holy Cross. Cobb tried a place kick and dropped 
the ball over the bar prettily. M. A. C, 10; Holy 

Cross, 3 

Holy Cross carried the ball to her own 40 yard line 
where it went over on a fumble to Turner. French 
had been put in in place of Warner, and gained 3 
yards, Bianey 15, French 2 more, and Morgan 2. 
Cobb tried for a drop kick and narrowly missed. Daly 
kicked out 20 yards from the 25 yard line. Cobb tak- 
ing the ball. French fumbled to Holy Cross and 



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I 



i 






i 






Daly punted. Cobb booted the ball back for 60 yards. 
Daly and Cobb exchanged punts again, and Holy 
Cross, finding that each exchange of punts netted 20 
yards for M. A, C, began line playing again, the half 
ending with the ball in Holy Cross possession on 
her own 25 yard line. 
The line-up: 



M . A. c. 
Turner, I. e. 
Farley. I. t. 
Anderson. 1. g. 
Paige, c. 
Sexton, r. g. 
Crosby, r. t. 

Crossman. Leonard, r. e. 
Cobb, q. b. 

Warner. French. I. h. b. 
Roberts. Blaney. r. h. b. 
Morgan, f. b. 
Touchdowns — Warner, Driscoll. 



HOLY CROSS 

r. e., Driscoll 
r. t., Pollatti 
r. g.. Sweeney 
c. Conti 
I. g.. Roache 
1. t., Trigg 
I. e., Daly 
q. b., Jones 
r. h. b.. Knight 
1. h. b.. Burke 
f. b.. O'Donnell 
Goal — Cobb ; from field 
— Cobb. Goal missed— Daly. Referee— P. J. Hehir. Wor 
cester. Umpire— W. H. Collins. M. D.. Northampton. 
Linesmen — T. J. Flaherty. Holy Cross; H. W. French and 
John F. O'Donnell, M. A. C; John J. Barry. Holy Cross 
Time — 20 minute halves. Attendance — 400. 



DEDICATION OF CLARK HALL. 

Clark Hall was dedicated on the afternoon of Oct. 
2. The following account of the exercises is taken 
from the Springfield Republican of Oct. 3: 

Dr. George E. Stone presided at the exercises, 
and after sketching briefly the history of the efforts to 
secure a new botanical building, to cost $70,000, and 
fine equipment setting a standard which other build- 
ings should strive toward, and paying tribute to Presi- 
dent Clark, for whom the building has been named, 
he introduced the first speaker, David P. Penhallow, 
professor of botany at McGill University, Montreal, 
and a graduate of the college In the class of 1873. 

Professor Penhallow, after speaking of his 
acquaintance with President Clark, said: "It is no 
ordinary occasion of rejoicing or of interest in the 
progress of technical education which brings us 
together here today, but rather is it an event full of 
significance and rich in the promise of benefts to that 
great industry which must ever be recognized as the 
foundation of all national prosperity. This event has 
a two fold significance, in that it marks one feature 
In the celebration of the 40th anniversary of the foun- 



dation of this college ; but more particularly that it 
celebrates the dedication of this dignified and well- 
equipped building, abundantly suggestive of lofty 
ideals, persistent endeavor and resolute purpose, to 
the service of scientific research and to the memory 
of one whose most cherished plans lay in the domain 
of botanical science; whose best Influence was 
exerted in behalf of scientific agriculture when that 
science was yet in the infancy; whose best energies 
were directed toward laying — strong and sure — the 
foundations of an institution whose mission he believed 
it to become a leader in agricultural education. 

"President Clark used to relate with a certain 
element of justifiable pride, but never in a spirit of 
boastfulness, that as a boy he always made it a rule 
to run faster, jump farther and higher, fight harder 
and swim mere strongly than any of his companions. 
The determination to excel in whatever he undertook 
was one of the first of his traits to impress itself upon 
the stranger. Those who knew him intimately read- 
ily appreciated this side of his character and under- 
stood that the dogged persistency with which he pur- 
sued any cherished plan, or sought to gain the ascend- 
ancy in competition, was an important factor in his 
career. It carried him through the Civil war and the 
terrible days of the Wilderness campaign ; it placed 
this institution on a secure and enduring foundation, 
which, in spite of its apparent lack of progress for 
many years, and the periods of despondency which at 
times come to all healthy organisms, will make it 
abundantly able to sustain that splendid superstructure 
of usefulness whicn seems to lie before it. It carried 
him to the far East, where his memory is firmly 
enshrined in the hearts of the Japanese, who to this 
day hold his name in the highest esteem as that of 
one who conferred great benefits upon their country. 

"President Clark's professional career was begun 
in fields quite distinct from those which he cultivated 
In later years. Under the guidance of Professor 
Hitchcock, he acquired a great taste for geology, and 
this, together with a special aptitude for chemistry, 
led him to choose this branch of science in connec 
tion with mineralogy in which he had gained distinc- 
tion as a student. It was in pursuit of a further 
knowledge of these subjects that he went to Gottingen 
to seek instruction at the hands of eminent German 
specialists. The one great lesson which this period 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



of his life seems to emphasize is the important recip- 
rocal relation of botany and chemistry. 

"While yet a student at Amherst College, Presi- 
dent Clark had followed the usual course in botany, 
as then prescribed by the college curriculum. His 
keen perception and receptive mind enabled him to 
see, while yet a student in Germany, a very different 
future for botanical science. This was first brought 
to his attention on the occasion of a visit in 1850 to 
the Royal gardens at Kew, Eng. He there observed 
for the first time the enormous resources of plant 
life. It was the experience gained at that time which 
had so marked an influence upon the early plans for 
the development of this college. The experience of 
those early years was gained at the most critical 
period in the history of modern botanical science. 
The influences which were at work during the earlier 
period of President CUrk's professional career were 
such as to produce a profound impression upon an 
observing mind. The trend of thought and the spirit 
of investigation thus awakened appealed to President 
Clark with peculiar force and led him to place the 
new opportunities before his students with successful 
results, and he may be regarded as one of the first In 
America to adopt this advanced position. He thus 
set in motion at this college influences of the greatest 
importance to the progress of botanical science which, 
centering here, later extended to far-away Japan, 
where such views had not become known, to various 
parts of the United States, and eventually to Canada. 
"President Clark's claim to scientific recognition 
rests, not so much upon his actual achievements in 
research, as upon his administrative capacity, and the 
intelligent manner in which he stimulated and encour- 
aged investigation on the part of others. As a mat- 
ter of fact, his only exploit in origioal botanical work 
is recorded in the report entitled "The phenomena of 
plant life." To the obscure problem of the move- 
ment of sap in trees, which had claimed the attention 
of botanists and had been the subject of more or less 
profound investigation for 300 years, he contributed 
new facts of great value. 

"It was one of his cherished plans that experiment 
stations should be established here, as throughout 
Germany. This hope has been realized, although the 
fulfilment was not accomplished until several years 
after his death ; but it must be conceded that his 



scientific observations, together with those of Goess- 
mann and Stockbridge, constituted the real beginning 
of the Hatch Experiment Station and gave a powerful 
impulse to a movement which at that time was hardly 
more than a suggestion, but which has since resulted 
In the establishment of similar stations throughout the 
United States and Canada." 

He paid a warm tribute to President Clark's strong 
personal qualities and then spoke of his work In Japan. 
"His entire period of service under the Japanese gov- 
ernment extended over less than one year, but during 
that time he laid the foundation of a most successful 
college of agriculture, which has since outgrown Its 
original purpose and has enlarged its sphere of useful- 
ness to that of a university, of which the college of 
agriculture remains one of its most important features. 
There is probably no part of President Clark's work 
which has left so enduring an impression and influence 
as his participation in the efforts of Japan to Introduce 
the best In our western civilization." 

He spoke In closing of the very Important connec- 
tion which must ever exist between the work of the 
college and the biological sciences. The study of 
zoology, he said, must always find a prominent place 
in the curricula of Institutions dealing with agricultural 
problems. But the study of botany Is of paramount 
importance, and Is, after all, the real foundation of 
scientific agriculture. He made a plea for thorough- 
ness and patience in the working out of the problem 
of the agricultural cohege and urged on the part of the 
students high ideals, persistent effort and unflinching 
purpose, keeping before them the example of Dr. 
Clark. 

Dr. Stone then introduced Prof. John M. Tyler of 
Amherst College, paying tribute to the share which 
Amherst College had In the founding of Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College, and speaking of It as the 
"mother college." Professor Tyler said In part : — 
Col. William S. Clark— I remember him well. 
The personality and doings of a man like Colonel 
Clark were an unfailing source of Interest and wonder 
to an inquisitive small boy living In the outskirts of a 
quiet village. Around his house there was always 
something fascinating and new going on. He was 
kind to boys, and I was always allowed a front seat. 
He was of medium hight, well knit, wiry and tough, 
built for endurance. His features were strong and 



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I 



pleasing. Dark, heavy, almost shaggy eyebrows 
overhung a pair of blue eyes. Some remember 
them as hazel. They were never two moments the 
same. They were keen and piercing; they melted, 
danced, flashed, and darkened by turns. They were 
eloquent. His most marked mental trait was his 
versatility. He investigated the chemical composi- 
tion of meteorites, the lifting power of growing 
squashes, the flow of sap. He was a teacher of rare 
power and influence. As a soldier he had few equals. 
He had great executive ability. He knew every- 
body, and everybody knew him. He was a born 
leader, and had that rare gift of personal magnetism 
which drew men to him and made them follow him. 

While teaching chemistry, botany and zoology at 
Amherst College he built a trotting track in the grove 
behind his house. He always had a fast horse, He 
studied and practiced the methods of training horses 
introduced by Rarey ; a system then greatly admired, 
now, I suppose, completely forgotten. He had a 
grapery, and built a greenhouse, and stocked it with 
rare plants. I well remember the first blossoming of 
his night-blooming cereus. It was the marvel of the 
neighborhood. He served three terms in the state 
Legislature, and brought the agricultural college to 
Amherst against the opposition of a host of competi- 
tors. He was a member of the state board of agri- 
culture, presidential elector, was the first president of 
the Amherst Water Company, a leader in every vil- 
lage improvement, president of your college, president 
of a college and a first-rate missionary and leader in 
Japan. Some of the first Japanese who studied In 
this country came here through his influence. 
Whatever his hand found to do, he did it with his 
might. He was a man after President Roosevelt's 
heart, of the strenuous life. 

Said a friend of him : "When he studied, he 
studied intensely: when he worked, he worked fero- 
ciously. His driving of horses, of himself, of every- 
body else, was like the driving of Jehu, the son of 
Nimshi. He always had a great many irons in the 
fire; and, if some of them burned, it was only whit 
men of ardent temperament, active mind, and enter- 
prising spirit are always liable la." I well remember 
his account of how, when a student in college, he 
took Professor Adams to a train in Northampton in 
early spring, when th^ frost was just coming out of 



that bottomless clay road. The pair of horses came 
late to Professor Adams's door. But through the mud 
they went to Hadley In 20 minutes, and reached 
Northampton in plenty of time for the train. Said the 
colonol ; "Professor Adams was somewhat scared, 
and he was all plastered with mud. But I got him 
there." I asked the man of whom he hired the 
horses whether he remembered the occasion. 
"Yes," he answered, "he drove those horses out- 
rageously." He had much of the boy in him to the 
very last days of his life He was ardent, impetuous, 
sanguine, often rash, overflowing with fun, wit and 
humor. Naturally the boys loved him. While a 
student in Gottingen he preformed the then unusual 
experiment of preparing potassium. The ingredients 
for the preparation were put up in an iron retort like a 
bomshell, an iron tube was screwed into this, and the 
retort was placed in a furnace heated like that of King 
Nebuchadnezzer. The molten material in the retort 
was likely to flow out, harden In the tube and stop it. 
In this case retort, furnace and laboratory were liable 
to rise together. It had to be continually cleared by 
vigorous thrusts of an iron rod. During the experi- 
ment the tube clogged. Professor Wohler, fearing for 
life and property, ordered the janitor to go in and 
dump the fire. Young Clark armed with the iron rod 
punched alternately at the janitor and the clogged 
tube. He held his ground, the fire was not dumped, 
the tube was cleared, and the experiment was a suc- 
cess. But no more potassium was manufactured in 
Gottingen for several years, until the experiment was 

repeated by Professor Harris, Colonel Clark's succes- 
sor at Amherst College. 

His lectures in chemistry were puncturated by loud 
explosions, partly of mixed gasses, partly of homeric 
laughter at his numerous and far-famed stories. In 
Easthampton he road his horse up a flight of wooden 
steps into a store while the honest cobbler below 
thought that an earthquake had happened, and 
trembled for his life. During the war he could lead 
his regiment anywhere, and his men always followed 
him. After two years of hard service he resigned 
because the government preferred forming new regi- 
ments to filling the shattered ranks of the old ones. 
Having be-'n made lieutenant-colonel in February, 
1862, and colonel in May, 1862, he was recom- 
mended by General Burnside for a "well-deserved 



promotion as brigadier-general" in September of the 
same year. 

It has been well said of him: "As a soidier, he 
was an utter stranger to fear. As a citizen and pub- 
lic man, he abhorred compromise and contended 
earnestly for justice, temperance and religion. He 
was an earnest and outspoken Christian, — a member 
of Mr. Eggleston's 'big-licks church,' militant and 
triumphant, Personally and socially attractive, a 
brilliant talker, a good listener, too, fond of telling 
stories, full of anecdote and adventure, of wit and re- 
partee. Colonel Clark was the life of the social 
circle, the faculty meeting, the gathering at the cor- 
ner of the streets, the legislative hall or the public 
assembly." May the spirit of investigation and search 
for the truth, of fresh youthful interest and strenuous 
work, of broad sympathies, of bold adventure, of pub- 
lic service, of high patriotism and pure religion abide 
in this hall which bears his name. 



FRED S. COOLEY. 

The editor regrets that an unpardonable oversight 
on his part has left from the columns of the Signal 
until this late date an account of the resignation of 
Prof. Fred S. Cooley and his assumption of new work 
in Montana. Professor Cooley, professor of agricul- 
ture since 1893, and for many years previous to that 
date connected with the college through the experi- 
ment station and farm department, resigned his posi- 
tion during August last to accept the position of 
Supervisor of Farmers' Institutes at Bozeman, Mont. 
The office is a newly created one in connection with 
Montana Agricultural College, and Professor Cooley 's 
duties are, in brief, to cooperate with farmer's clubs, 
agricultural and horticultural societies and associa- 
tions, particularly in the matter of preparing programs 
and selecting speakers for Farmers' Institutes. The 
field of work open to Professor Cooley is broad, and 
the Signal joins with all students and alumni who 
have known Professor Cooley in wishing him the best 
of success and happiness in his new environment. 
Professor Cooley will be missed by many who have 
admired him for his genial disposition and skillfull con- 
duct of the class-room exercises. He always has an 
apt story with which to emphasize his point. The 
editor takes pleasure In printing a letter addressed to 
the Signal from Professor Cooley. 



Bozeman, Mont., Sept. 23, 1907. 
Editor of College Signal : — 

The opening of the college year recalls to me a 
feeling of loss in not being able to greet my student 
friends in M. A. C. on their return to college and I 
am impelled to transmit my greeting through the col- 
umns of The Signal. I am still at M. A. C. this 
being "a change of name but not of letter." From 
my office windows 1 look out across the campus, and 
over the town a mile distant to the Bridger range of 
mountains rising 9000 feet into the sky only five 
miles distant, To the south but a single range sep- 
arates this valley (the Gallatin) from the Yellowstone 
Park. The last railroad station at which we stopped 
on our way to Bozeman was Livingston, the gateway 
to the national park. 

Last Friday night there was a faculty picnic, in the 
form of a moonlight straw-ride to Shedd's Bridge, a 
camping spot on the banks of the West Gallatin river, 
near the point where it merges from the canyon, leading 
into Yellowstone Park. Thirty-two men and women 
of the faculty constituted the load, which proved too 
heavy for the wagon ; and a broken wheel added zest 
to the picnic. Music is a feature of the Montana 
Agricultural College curriculum, and Its effect appears 
similar west and east, for the professor of violin for- 
got his wife on the return of the expedition, leaving 
her to find her way home alone. One of the features 
of the town Is the Ladies' Imperial Band of about 30 
pieces which furnished good music at the interstate 
fair. My interest continues In all your college inter- 
ests and particularly in your football contests. 

Very cordially, 

F. S. Cooley. 



PHI KAPPA PHI. 

(Communicated.) 
Phi Kappa Phi Is an honor fraternity. It stands 
for the best product of representative individualism 
which this college can give to the world. Member- 
ship in this fraternity is therefore to be prized; but 
only so far as the organization is a feature by which 
the college is judged. Membership in the Phi Kappa 
Phi, and the existence of an honor fraternity in the 
college are, to most people, things of slightly differ- 
ent import ; but when we seek their deeper meanings 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



we find them merging into one. The establishment 
of such a fraternity here means that this college 
offers courses which prepare for high stations of use- 
fulness in practical affairs, which afford opportunities 
for achievement, and which lay the foundations of 
good citizenship. Its existence here is meant to 
encourage effort in these directions and to offer an 
incentive to high attainment. These considerations 
apply to any honor fraternity, in any school, if such 
fraternity has any real meaning in the life of the 
school. In this largest sense Phi Kappa Phi expects 
the support of faculty, alumni, and students, irrespect- 
ive of membership, because Phi Kappa Phi stands 
for what this college is striving to do. 






WARNING TO THE FRESHMAN. 

Believing the Freshmen are over-running the rules 
as laid down by the Senate at the first of the college 
year and that they do not know their correct place 
here in college, we, the members of the Sophomore 
class, for the welfare of the college do hereby lay 
down these stringent rules to be conscientiously obeyed 
by the Freshman class. 

Now take heed unto these rules and obey them or 
suffer the displeasure and resultant penalties imposed 
by the Sophomore class. 

Rule 1. Freshmen shall salute all Seniors until 
Christmas vacation and the members of the Faculty 
at all times. The salute shall be given when three 
paces away from the person to be saluted. 

Rule 2. Their conduct shall be at all times 
gentlemanly. 

Rule 3. Freshmen shall not wear any part of 
their uniform except at drill. 

Rule. 4. They shall give up the sidewalk at all 
times in preference to the members of the three upper 
classes. 

Rule 5. They shall be at all times subservient to 
the members of the three upper classes. 

Rule 6. Freshmen shall not smoke outside their 
rooms except in the celebration of a victory over the 
Sophomores. Smoking shall cease outside their 
rooms the morning following the victory. 

Rule 7. Their language shall not be loud, bois- 
terous nor profane. 

Rule 8. Freshmen shall knock and receive per- 
mission before entering the room of a member of 



the three upper classes. 

Rule 9. No "Prep" school insignia of any kind 
shall be worn where it can be seen. 

Rule 10, Freshmen shall not wear their trousers 
turned up more than one turn. 

Rule II. They shall keep their coats on at all 
times. 

Rule 12. Freshmen shall remove their hats on 
entering the Trophy room. 

College Not^$. 

The old chapel bell has been hung in the south- 
east corner of the Trophy room on a frame made 
from the old flag pole. A new piano has also been 
placed in the Trophy room. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi has made the following preliminary 
elections from the class of 1908: T. A. Barry, T. 
L. Warner and W. J. Turner. 

On Friday, Oct. 18, Ben Chadwick, the composer 
of the music of "Sons of Old Mass'chusetts" visited 
college and at the drill hour gave a rehearsal showing 
how he meant the song to be sung. 

A door and a flight of stairs Is being put in 
opposite the treasurer's office in the tower of South 
College so that the Dairy rooms In the basement will 
be accessable from the front of the building. 

The musiral organizations have organized with H. 
M. Jennison, 1908, as manager. W. E. Adams, 
1909, leader of the orchestra, L. W. Chapman, 

1908, as leader of the glee club and C. H. White, 

1909, as leader of the mandolin club. The orchestra 
held its first rehearsal last night. 

The members of the 1910 Index board have been 
appointed by the editor, W. R. Clarke, and the busi- 
ness manager, F. T. Haynes, as follows : Assistant 
manager, E. F. Damon; artists, J. T. Blaney and 
Louis Brandt; associate editors, H, A. Brooks, L. S. 
McLane, F. L. Thomas and W. C. Johnson. 

At a meeting of the Horticultural Seminar last 
Friday, Professor E. A. White gave an interesting 
lantern slide lecture upon mushrooms. Professor 
White presented the classification of mushrooms and 
pointed out the characters distinguishing nonedible 



mushrooms from the edible ones, which Include the 
great majority of the fleshy fungi. He spoke briefly 
of commercial mushroom culture and the economic 
importance of a knowledge of the species. 

The assembly, Oct. 23., was devoted to the in- 
terests of Phi Kappa Phi honorary fraternity. The 
program opened with organ music, after which Dean 
George F. Mills, president of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, introduced 
Professor E. A. Grosvenor of Amherst college and 
president of Phi Seta Kappa honorary fraternity, as 
the speaker of the afternoon. Professor Grosvenor 
spoke of the place of the college honorary fraternity as 
a part of the broadening college life, and then out- 
lined briefly the history of the founding of Phi Beta 
Kappa of William and Mary college in 1776, and 
sketched its later history as the fortunes of William 
and Mary rose and fell, until in 1883 the fraternity 
had 24 chapters, and today has a chapter in 71 col- 
leges and universities in the United States. The in- 
creasing popularity of the fraternity led to a decision 
of the fraternity authorities that only academic col- 
leges should be admitted to the roll of chapters, and 
this decision led directly to the founding of another 
honorary fraternity, Phi Kappa Phi, In Institutions of 
a technical nature. 

Department* ^lotes. 

THE EXPERIMENT STATION. 

The director has recently inspected the work of the 
sub-station for the investigation of asparagus culture 
at Concord. The work has been carefully carried 
out there, and the results have proven highly satisfac- 
tory. The growth of the asparagus under the dif- 
ferent systems of fertilization practiced was superior 
to anything seen before in that great asparagus grow- 
ing section. 

The apple crop of the Experiment Station orchard 
has been harvested. The results showing that the 
employment of wood ashes is very favorable in 
producing a superior color and quality in the fruit, and 
further that the combination of fine-ground bone and 
sulphate of potash gives better crops than the use of 
the ground bone with muriate of potash. 

Mr. H. j. Franklin has concluded the season's 



work on cranberry insects at Wareham and will soon 
resume his studies here. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 

Mr. Hepburn has completed his tour of Massachu- 
setts as official inspector of foods and has collected 
some three hundred and fifty samples of different 
animal foods for analysis. The work of the analysis 
ot these feeds is under the supervision of Mr. P. H. 
Smith. Mr. Smith has been engaged for the past 
(en days In Farmer's Institute work in Maine. 

Work is in progress at the Experiment Station barn 
in studying the effect of specific food constituents on 
the composition of butter fat. A number of cows 
will be fed exclusively upon a hay diet during the en- 
tire period of lactation, In order to determine the 
specific effect of hay upon changes in the butter fat 
molecule. Other animals will be fed upon a hay and 
grain ration, in order to determine if the grain has 
any effect in improving the quality of butter fat. This 
work is in charge of Mr. Hall and with Dr. McLauren 
as assistant. 

The station is expecting to receive a new lot of 
sheep for digestion experiments. 

DEPARTMENT OF FERTILIZERS. 

Mr. Haskins has returned from a two weeks vaca- 
tion. 

The analysis of the fertilizers, collected during the 
spring and summer months, is nearly completed. 
The results will soon be presented in bulletin form. 

Dr. Goessmann's office is being repaired and re- 
furnished for his future occupancy. 



Alu 



mm. 



If you . have not already placed your order for 
a 1909 Index do so at once. Do not delay for 
though we have had to order more copies than 
were originally contracted for, the demand will 
without doubt be greater than the supply. Order 
today of the Business Manager. 

On Saturday, Nov. 2, after the football game 
with Amherst, the Local Alumni Association of 
M. A. C. will hold a supper at Draper Hall at 6 
P. M. sharp. Tickets $1.50. The football team 
will be the guests of the alumni. Music by the 



IO 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 









college orchestra. Special car to Northampton to 
connect with train for Springfield and Hartford 
after the supper. Extend this invitation to 
every graduate or former student, regular course 
or short course, that you may meet. A good 
time is assured. We had 67 present at the sup- 
per last year and want 100 this year. 
A. C. MONAHAN, 

Secretary, L. A. A. M. A. C. 

72. The following more complete information 

relative to the death of Henry Wells has been 
received: — "Henry Wels of Washington, D. C, 
died Sept. 19 at his summer home in Jamestown, 
Rhode Island. Funeral services were hM at Stock- 
bridge, Mass. , where the interment was made Sept. 2 1 . 
The announcement of the passing away of Mr. Wells 
was not unexpected to those in the wide circle of his 
acquaintance in this city. For several years past, in 
fact ever since an attack of typhoid fever, Mr. Wells 
had not been in good health, and during the past 
twelve months he failed rapidly. The Immediate 
cause of his death was paralysis. Mr. Wells had 
been in the real estate and insurance business for the 
past fifteen years In Washington, D. C, and for a 
time he was president of the board of fire underwriters 
of the District, and in that capacity showed executive 
ability of a high order. He was a man of pleasant, 
genial nature and a great favorite with all who knew 
him. His wife and daughter survive him. 

Ex-72. — We have received a very interesting list 
of 40 books written by Frederick A. Ober, of Hack- 
ensack, N.J. From "Who's Who in America" we 
derive the following information with reterence to Mr. 
Ober : "Explored Lake Okeechober region of Florida 
1872-4 ; made ornithological exploration of Southern 
West Indies 1876-8, and 1880, finding 22 New 
species and many types now in the Smithsonian Insti- 
tution of Washington; in Mexico 1881, 1883, 1885; 
later in Spain, North Africa, South America and 
again in West Indies." His writings include travels, 
historical sketches and novels. The Watchman says. 
"Mr. Ober weaves into the accurate facts of history 
the charm of romance." 

73. — Henry B. Simpson, 902 Perry Avenue, N. 
W., Wisii i^to.1, D. C. Mutual Firs Insurance 
Company. 



'92.— Jewell B. Knight, Poona, India, Professor 
of Agriculture Poona College, residence Kirkel, 
India. 

'93.— Edwin C. Howard, Corner B and3dSts., 
South Boston, Sub-Master Lawrence School, Boston. 
Residence 156 Hillside Ave., Arlington Heights. 

'93. —Franklin 3. Hoyt, 4 Park St., Boston. 
Editor of the Educational Department, Houghton, 
Mifflin & Co., residence 27 Dana St., Cambridge. 

'93._Henry F. Staples, 802 Rose Building, 
Cleveland, O. ; Physician and surgeon, editor of the 
transactions of the Homeopathic Medical Society of 
Ohio, Professor of Hygiene, Cleveland Homeo- 
pathic Medical College; Secretary Homeopathic 
Medical Society of Ohio; President of Cleveland 
Homeopathic Medical Society ; Vice-President and 
member of medical staff of Cleveland City Hospital. 
Residence 8628 Wade Park Ave., Cleveland, 0. 

'93.— Luther W. Smith, Manager Highland Farm, 
Mantino, 111. 

'94.— Edwin H. Alderman. R. F. D. NO. 2, 
Chester, Mass. Farmer, 

'94.— Claude F. Walker, Park Avenue and 59th 
Street, New York City. Assistant Supervisor of lec- 
tures, Department of Education, City of New York. 
Residence 2 St. Nicholas Place, New York. 

'94. — H. Preston Smead. Farmer, Dummerston. 
'95.— Thomas P. Foley, Construction Dept., Otis 
Elevator Co., 17 Battery PI., New York city, 1 Drafts- 
man. Residence 466 Valley Road, West Orange, 
N.J. 

'96.— Q. Chester Poole, 292 Pine St., Fall River. 
Osteopathic physican. 

'96.— Walter B. Harper, Box 21, Bogabusa, La. 
Manager Turpentine Dept. of the Great Southern 
Laboratory Co. 

'96.— Merle E. Sellew, Principal of Washington 
Street School, Wallingford, Conn. 

'00.— Mark H. Munson, Sheep Rancher and 
Stock Drover, Proprietor Sunny Valley Sheep Ranch, 
Littleville, Mass. 

'00.— Edward T. Hull, M. D., 240 West 135th 
St., New York, Physician. 

'01. — N. D. Whitman, Associate Member A. S. 



C. E., 625 Citizen's National Bank, Los Angeles, 
Cal. Engineer for Reinforced Concrete Pipe Com- 
pany, Los Angeles. 

'01. — Ralph I. Smith, formerly State Entomolo- 
gist of Georgia has recently taken the position of 
Entomologist of Georgia has recently taken the posi- 
tion of Entomologist for the A. and M. College and 
Experiment Station. Address, 119 E. Edenton St., 
Raleigh. N. C. 

'02.— O. F. Cooley, suite 623 Empire Bldg., 
Denver, Colo., assistant engineer, Denver & Trans- 
continental Railroad. 

'02.— Leander F. Claflin, 1107 Chestnut St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., Shoe Salesman. 

'03. — H. J. Franklin has returned from Ware- 
ham, Mass., where he has been carrying on investi- 
gations with cranberry insects, and will complete his 
graduate work in entomology. 

'04. — Married Aug. 20, Elwin Stanley Fulton to 
Miss Mabel C. Smith of North Amherst. At home 
Cottage St., Amherst. 



'04.— Zachary T. Hubert, Supt. of Spelician 
Seminary, Atlanta, Ga. Residence, 35 Humphries 
Place, Atlanta. 

'04.— Married, Oct. 23, at Manchester, N. H., 
Maurice Adin Blake to Miss Beulah Angie Hoitt. 

•06.— A. H. M. Wood, Sup't Taghkami farm, 
Copake Iron Works, N. Y. 

'06. — Ben Strain, assistant engineer, Central New 
England Railroad Co., Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

'07. — J. T. Caruthers, Manual Training School, 
Bordentown, N.J. 

AMHERSTCO-OP~ 

For ONE WEEK Beginning Oct. 28th 

SPECIAL SALE OF 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pillow Tops. 

move: on to the: 






College Styles. 

Where will you find style at its top-most pitch? In the great uni- 
versities, to be sure. 

The college youth knows fashion as the small boy knows the farthest 
corner of the jam closet. "College Clothes" is a phrase which falls 
tnpdingly from scores of tongues. Many tailors claim them — mighty few 
produce them. 

We invite you to "size" us up — your judgement will do the rest. 
Autumn and Winter woolens ready in the freshest weaves and "classiest" 
colorings. Custom-perfect tailoring at moderate prices — that's ours. 



fei<3C &<%? SM2P 

VUvtays welcome-bity or pot 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To i:i»<- your .sole, ('nine lonie for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. 









It's Your Next at the 



Merc) House Bamer Stop 



Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 8 1'. M. 


Tuesdays \ 


r " 


6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


. «i 


8 " 


Thursdays, 7 


M 


6 " 


Fridays, j 


■ it 


8 * 


Saturdays, 7 


ti 


11 " 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 



ALSO 



Dying % CUmnmg A Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

t P~r'ull l»res» Stilts to rent. gJ-Studenta' Clothe 8 bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amiikkst, Mass. 

GOODS FOR MEN 




C & K. DiiRBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



RaDar's jnn, 

Old South Street, off Main, - NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvement*, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Ground*. Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 PEH, DAT. 

When in " Hirap." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Poeket Magnifiers for Botanists 

3 Lens 60c 
2 Lens 50c 



OLIVER TYPEWRITER. 



HHPAIR SHOP. 



^. A. THOMPSON, 

Hear First National Bank, AMHERST 



CapsandGotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av#» , Nkw York. 




GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

<r'r<'J'\s Strong, Vigorous, J I ealthy Plants That liesist Disease 

l>K. UKOftOB K. STUNK Professor of Botany at t It* Masa. 

rtgrli nltnral 1'ollfi f il Profteaaor of Plant Dtaraeai it the 

II ill li r \ itrliiM til Station, Amherst, Mass., writes to our 

Agriculiurni Expert aa tollows: 

•' 1 aril] say tliat 1 conaider the formula which you 
prepared for Mr. I'reacott ami applied by talm on Ida 
iMwta »■»» very effectual in MBtroUtng the aaparaKUs 
in-.!. The application of your formula and other tea 
tuns which were carried out 111 the management of 
these Ih its convince me that It constituted the heat 
•lemon .nation of the control of aaparagui- runt which 
has ever been made In tbla country." 

GENUINE PERUVIAN UUAVO formed the baala of the 
abova mentioned formula. It wa» uaed on the aaparagus tieds 
of 0, W. I'kbscott., Concord, Muss., the largest Individual 
grower of Asparagus In New England We alao offer 

WK ALSO OKVKK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slapr, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from New York, Boston, 

Mass., and Charleston, S. c. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant Komi 

Problema," la aent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Sole Importer* for IT. S. of Genuine Peruvian Onano, and 
Manufacturers of High tirade Kertlltiera. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



Fine Athletic Goods 



TENNIS, GOLF 
BASE BALL, 

Jerseys, Sweaters. 



The 
Wright ft Dllaon 

CHAMPIONSHIP 
TENNIS, BALL, 

Send for Catalogue- 
Free. 




Wright & Ditson 

New York, Boston, Chicago, 
Providence, R. I., Cambridge, Mai. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic l»lock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for iU excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. M. to 4 a. U. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MANUFACTUBXK OF 

SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Umon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. fountains charged to order 



III V EH 8TBKBT, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 



OUR ICE CRFAW SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 

BANANA SPLITS. 

M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR. 

lias received the latest fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Qcutletncn's Garments. Also does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

KJ- Military Work a Specialty .^££ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amherst, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up -to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

M.A.C.Ag't, H.M.JBNNII»OIV,'0» 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
«• •• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

i^r8ATI8FAOTION OUARANTBBD.'fc 1 

B. A. VTI.KY, Manager. 

OFFICE: 

East Pleasant Street. 



Show Your Colors Saturday! 

Arm Banners for the Amherst Game. 

ALSO 

College and Fraternity Seal Paper. 

AT THE 

COLLEGE STORES. 

Don't be Deceived. 

In buying a Sewing Mac hink, be sure yon <\o so from 
reliable manufacturers. Tbe New Homb has a record that 
Is the envy of all others. Dealers In all parts of the 
country. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, 1). I). S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, A 11 II LUST, MASS. 



C. S. GATES, D.D.B. 

DENTAli ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. 5. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... AMUKKST, MASS 

Offick Hooks i 
S TO 18 .A.. M.. 1-SO TO O J». JVt. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Oas administered when desired. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS 



High Grade Stationery, .• 
Stamping and Embossing. 

JEWELRY, CLOCK REPAIRING. 

Music and Musical Merchandise. 



Jeweler-F. W. ROBERTS-Optician 

197 Main St., Northampton, Mass. 



C. R. ELDER, 



SELLS 



GOOD COAL 



AT RIGHT PRICES. 



GonneGtiGut valley street Railway Go. 

AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cars will leav* Amherst for Northampton on Hit- hour ami 
half hour from (i 30 a. m. till 10.00 P.M. Sun. lays the first car 
will leave at H. 50 a. M. 

Car.-, leave Northampton for Amherst on the hour ami half 
hour, from 6. SO a. m. to 11 P. M. The last car wait., for i>luy» at 
the Aca.lemy of Music tin<l for the train from SprinKfieUiilue 
to arrive ut 11 its 

> pedal cars on application. 

Main iikfick, Gkkknkiki.d, Mass. 

John A.TaKKart, Supt. 

Southampton office, lo*i Maim St. 

0. W. Clapp, A sat. Mupt. 

Telephone, Northampton, 178-2. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Uolyoke at 22 and M 
minutes past each hour until 'J. 52 p. m , ami Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 

Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 8, 1900. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. *., 
express, and 5.48 r. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH ROUND. 

Leave Amherst for Rrattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. E. BENTLKY, 

General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

Now ready for the Football Season, also suitabe 
for Informals. 

See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

OF HORTICULTURE, M. A. C. 

Telephone. 



Arthur E. Dorr. L- H. Tourtklotte. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 




PHOTOGKAPHE 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street. - - • Northampton, Mars. 

Tel. 332-2. 




THR LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAV- 
ING HOUSE IN THE WORLD. 

Works: nth Street ILelihfoe. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STARLES 

CHASES, BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



J. H.TROTT 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College 



PLDIBBER, STEHJII S GHS FITTER, 

Ml IEILE1 II STOVES HMD 1IICES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINE OP GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AMD MAMCFACTURKHS OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY OOODS. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



VISIT MY 



New Art Store, 

189 Main Street, 

Northampton, Mass. 

Store and Basement devoted entirely to Picture Framing. 
We are Specialists in this line. 

lv. R. CHEW. 




We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



LET 



BILL 



II 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates, 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MAS8. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER A CO. 



CAKKNftt «c ftOWHOUS*, 



i>r>iMm 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST., 



URNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



AMHftSf , Aa$$. 



/ 






flfcassacbueette 



Bgricultural 

Golleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
o 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the Lnited 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 



(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2 A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, trench, Uer 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. A- 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS., NOVEMBER 13, 1907 



/ 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, HHAWIDOiilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 





OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



GO TO .... 



page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS UN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 






Deuel's Drug Store. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings BAKK Block, - . AMHERST. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 13. 1907 



NO. 4 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni arc requested to contribute Communications should be addressed. College Signal. Amherst. Mass. The Sional will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested t« 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief 

R. H VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Assistant Ed tor 

O. B. BRICCS. 1909. Assistant Business Manager 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes O. B. BRICGS. 1909. Alumni Notes 

J. R. PARKER. 1908. Athletics. W. E. ADAMS. 1909. Special. 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908. College Notes. E. F. DAMON, I - 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. W R. CLARK, 1910. 

Terms: fl.oo per sssr in sdesncs Single Copies. lOc. Postage entsids el United States and Canada. Mc. ejrtrs. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Association. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket -bail Association. 
Base Ball Association 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sac. 

K. E. Cillett. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman. Manager . 
College Senate. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indei. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President. 



J. R.Parker . Pres. 
R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 

C. H. White. Pres 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered aa 



id-class matter, Past Office at Amherst 




When the editor took up his work upon the Signal 
he outlined his policy for the year as one that should 
ever keep in mind the greatest good to the college: 
a policy which should avoid criticism, trusting rather 
that all is for the good, and will eventually work itself 
out as such If the college men and representative 
organizations but preserve an attitude of healthy vigor 
and good will. And this policy has been closely 
adhered to. The editor is no more than human, and 
having placed his heart and soul in the work of edit- 
ing a paper worthy of the college, has naturally sought 
for some sign of approval of the work he and his 
board are doing. The student body has maintained 
an air of conservative silence, with occasionally a 
little good-natured bantering — a welcome sign, for 
when college men are not kicking they are satisfied. 
Various members of the faculty have expressed in no 
uncertain terms their approval of the attitude the 
Signal has taken on various subjects and its general 



business-like treatment of the college news. But 
there is a third party to consider, the alumni. As 
the copy has been prepared for each Issue the editor 
has not failed to keep in mind the view point of the 
men who have graduated from the college, and who 
depend upon the college paper to keep them In touch 
with the college life. The alumni column has been 
given special attention, until today, under the present 
alumni editor, it has reached a state of development 
rarely attained in a regular college publication. And 
have the alumni been appreciative of the work of the 
board of editors ? The editor has looked through his 
mail day after day in vain for some few words of 
encouragement and approval, not that he felt that he 
really needed them, but that his pride was perhaps 
piqued a little. You know how it Is a single word 
goes a long way. A few days ago the manager 
handed the following letter to the editor from a loyal 
alumnus : 

Baltimore. Md.. Nov. I, 1907, 
The College Signal, Amherst. Mass., 

Dear Sir: — By chance, an issue of the paper has 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



just come to my attention. It was addressed to 
1001 Clinton St., Baltimore, Md. I cannot under- 
stand why such should be the case for it has not been 
sent there for years and was last sent to 339 Bloom 
St., '-The Kenilworth," where I still reside. 

However, when I sent my check in full of all 
indebtedness over one year ago, 1 tried to emphasize 
the fact that I wanted the paper stopped at the end 
of the year for good and all and requested the party 
to whom I sent same to make a record to that effect 
so the new board would not begin another year's sub- 
scription which I presume you have done although 
this is my first number this year. 

I do not care for the paper for I feel ashamed to 
have the paper about for my friends of other colleges 
to peruse as it does not do justice to the institution 
from which it is issued and so little is made of the 
Alumni News that it does not appeal to me. The 
present number above mentioned is far better than 
any I have seen in a long time. Very truly yours, 
(Signed) Samuel W. Wiley. '98. 

So, then, has the editor failed from the point of 
view of the alumni ? The author is not and cannot 
be sincere in his criticism. The editor has upon his 
table weekly the papers of 20 or 30 colleges and 
technical schools, to say nothing of numerous high 
school publications, and he knows that his judgment 
is not warped when he says that the College Sicnal, 
In its dignified and business-like treatment of college 
topics and its devotion to alumni news, ranks with 
the best of them. The Signal does not attempt the 
story and poem and essay ; space is precious In a 
bi-weekly publication, and many sacrifices have to be 
made as it is. It is this business-like nature of the 
publication which sets it in the first rank of college 
papers. And now for a few statistics derived from a 
casual glance through the issues of the last college year 
and this year to date: In the 20 issues have appeared 
a total of 58 columns of alumni news, or an average 
of nearly three columns out of 21 per issue. During 
this period of a little over a year, the name of the 
writer of this critical letter has appeared three times, 
each time with several lines comment. During the 
same period the Signal has made notice of 125 per- 
sons who were in college at the same time as the 
writer, in the classes of 1896 to 1901 Is the criti- 
cism fair ? 



The present policy governing the make-up of each 
issue of the Signal is as follows : 

1. Judicious editorial comment upon questions of 
college interest, in which it is endeavored to express 
the sentiment of those who have the best interests of 
the college at heart. 

2. A full and minute record of athletic events in 
which the college has participated. The student 
body demands that this department be given generous 
treatment, and the younger alumni also insist upon a 
full record under athletics. 

3. A pithy summary under College Notes of the 
main events which have transpired during the last two 
weeks. 

4. A full account of the activities of the various 
departments under Department Notes, — a column of 
interest to everybody. 

5. An account of alumni activities, — brief, pithy 
notices, — under Alumni Notes, of interest to both 
alumni and students. 

6. A full account of special activities, social, 
intellectual, religious, etc., occupying such space as 
remains. 

It may be noted here that two other college papers 
pattern after the Signal in the above classification of 
college news, with but slight modifications. 

The real complaint against the Signal has been 
that it shows but ordinary care in the use of language, 
articles often being apparently hastily written, and 
that the proof does not always appear free from typo- 
graphical mistakes. The present editors are working 
toward the perfection of a system of proof reading, 
and with greater care on the part of the type-setters 
hope to issue a paper free from typographical errors. 
There are several reasons which conspire to make 
the grade of English composition but ordinary. The 
two main difficulties under which the editors labor 
are lack of credit and lack of time. No excuses are 
given members of the board for absence from regular 
college exercises when engaged upon Signal work. 
The editors have to draw generously from their own 
spare time, sacrificing work, pleasure and studies for 
the sake of the college paper. And this comes hard 
in a technical institution where men are kept hustling 
with exercises and the necessity of preparation for the 
next day's work. Not only this, but the sacrifice of 
time means also a sacrifice of possible income during 



the spare hours which all of us are more or less 
dependent upon. This sacrifice of time and money 
goes unrecompensed. The athlete gets his recom- 
pense in the glory of the conquest, a hard-earned 
sweater, bearing the coveted letter, a series of pleas 
ant trips to various colleges, with excuses for all 
absences. Athletics are recognized as a necessary 
evil, for the glory of the college, but did ever a mem- 
ber of the faculty suggest that the editors of the col- 
lege paper are also deserving of a little consideration? 
Perhaps so, but it was hushed up before reaching 
editorial ears. It has been suggested patiently, time 
after time, that members of the Signal Board be 
given credit for work in the English Department, but 
each time the applicants have been impatiently 
repulsed as seeking favors which other colleges grant, 
but which may not be granted here. So, then, what 
is the inspiration to good work on the Signal when 
honor, credit and time are refused? I'll tell you 
what the inspiration is. - it is a burning fire of loyalty 
to college and college interests. It takes that sort 
of inspiration and nerve to do a thing in the face of 
mere impassive acquiescence. And does your 
loyalty to the college teach you nothing better than a 
spirit of destructive criticism of its representative 
organ? No institution, no part of an institution, no 
organization, no individual is perfect and free from 
faults. But shall we criticize destructively t There 
is a sort of friendly criticism which seeks to encour- 
age and help, to build up and strengthen, and it is 
that criticism which spells progress. So, then, if you 
have any ideas which may aid the work of the editors, 
offer them for consideration. We will not promise 
to adopt your suggestions, for no one, be he alumnus 
or student, knows as well as the editors do what the 
demands upon the members of the board today and 
now are. We must work out our own problems to 
suit the conditions we are facing. You may aid, but 
don't destroy. 

Note: In justice to the college authorities, it 
should be said that one member of the Sicnal Board 
is allowed cuts for two periods bi-weekly for the pur- 
pose of reading the last proof just before the forms 
are closed. It may also be added that at the present 
time the aforesaid member of the board happens to 
have those two hours off anyhow, so the concession is 
of no benefit under present circumstances. 



Athletic No-Us- 



FOOTBALL 

To many the game with Springfield Training School 
next Saturday, will mean much, To the three lower 
classes it means the last chance to see in action the 
best quarter back the college has ever had, it means 
the last chance to see all of the 1908 football men 
who are now playing on the team. To the Seniors 
It means even more. Not only is it the last chance 
to see fellow class-mates on the gridiron, but to many 
it means the last chance to cheer the team to victory, 
and to a few it means the last football game to be 
witnessed for years. 

But to the men of 1908 who are on the team the 
game will mean the most. It means their last 
chance to play the game, their last chance to struggle, 
to fight, and to win for Massachusetts. It means 
they are going to end their football career by playing 
the very best game of their lives. 

Are you going to see the game ? Will you pay the 
1908 football men the tribute of watching and cheer- 
ing their last play ? Every Senior will. Let the rest 
do likewise. 

Amherst, 0: M. A. C, 0. 
The annual game with Amherst was played on Pratt 
Field, Saturday Nov. 2. and resulted In a tie score, 
neither side being able to score, although the ball at 
one time was on the Amherst five yard line. Indica- 
tions pointed to a record crowd and a spectacular 
game, but the weather man put a damper on both. 
The game was played in the rain on a slippery, slushy 
field, which made field-goals, and runs, and trick 
plays almost impossible. The weather conditions 
were especially discouraging to M. A. C, because 
Coach Bullock had worked up a nice assortment of 
trick-plays and forward passes, and it was expected 
that Captain Cobb would duplicate his feat of last year 
when he kicked two goals from the field. As it was, 
none of the new plays were tried, and although Cap- 
tain Cobb had two easy tries for goals, the ball was 
too heavy and both attempts failed. Although not 
spectacular, the game was an Interesting one to watch. 
Both teams fought desperately for every inch of 
ground and put a vim and dash into the play under 
very discouraging conditions. Neither side could gain 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









consistently by rushing the ball, Amherst gaining 85 
yards in this way, and Massachusetts I 15 yards, and 
the game developed into a punting match between 
Cobb and Shattuck in which Cobb had much the bet- 
ter of it, one kick going for 65 yards. The Amherst 
Student stated that his punting had never been ex- 
celled on Pratt Field. The Amherst team was some- 
what weakened by an unfortunate injury to their 
quarter-back early in the game and by other injuries 
which made it necessary to put In five substitutes. 
The Massachusetts team was in fine physical trim and 
went through the game without a change in the line- 
up. The work of Captain Cobb was of a high order. 
Not only did he do some splendid punting with a wet 
and heavy ball, but he also received Shattuck 's punts in 
faultless style, and by clever dodging ran two of them 
back many yards. Philbrick was a good ground gainer 
and a tower of strength on defense. For Amherst, 
Haldeman and Gildersleeve played the best game. 
Haldeman was the best ground gainer on the team, 
while the Amherst captain not only played his posi- 
tion but made tackles all over the field. 

The game : Cobb kicked off to Blades who ran the 
ball in to the 23 yard line. Amherst gained 5 yards 
in two downs and then punted to Cobb. On the first 
play M. A. C. made 9 yards in a forward pass, Cobb 
to Turner. Roberts made one yard ; Philbrick made 
4 yards through center. After Roberts was tried for 
no gain, Blaney made a 16 yard run. M. A. C. 
could then gain only 7 yards in three tries, and it was 
Amherst's ball. Amherst couldn't gain, and Shattuck 
punted to Roberts. Cobb made 4 yards. On the 
next play M. A. C. was penalized 15 yards for hold- 
ing. Blaney could make only 3 yards, and Captain 
Cobb punted to Shattuck. Amherst then fumbled 
twice in succession, but recovered the ball each time. 
Amherst was off-side on the next play and was penal- 
ized 5 yards. Shattuck then punted to Roberts, who 
was downed on the M. A. C. 35 yard line. Blaney 
made 9 yards ; Philbrick 4 yards. Roberts and 
Blaney then added 3 yards apiece. Cobb 
punted; Shattuck failed to gain. Curby was taken 
out of the game, Shattuck shifting from half-back to 
quarter and Atwood going in at half in the place of 
Shattuck. Blades made 4 yards and then 6 more. 
Amherst couldn't gain in the next two attempts, and 
Shattuck punted to Cobb. Roberts and Philbrick 



made a total of 6 yards, and Cobb punted. Amherst 
made 7 yards in two attempts, and tried the on-side 
kick, Roberts getting the ball on the M. A. C. 27 
yard line. Philbrick made 8 yards and failed to gain 
on the next attempt. The ball was fumbled, but Cobb 
received it and gained 3 yards. Roberts made I 
yard; Philbrick 3 yards. Cobb punted to Shattuck, 
who ran it back to the M. A. C. 50 yard line. Kil- 
bourn made 3 yards. Amherst tried the forward pass 
but it failed and Amherst went back io yards. 
Shattuck failed to gain, and punted outside at the M. 
A. C. 40 yard line. Cobb made I yard on a re- 
covered fumble. Philbrick failed to gain, and Cobb 
punted to the Amherst 40 yard line. Atwood made 4 
yards. Amherst tried the on-side kick, and Cobb got 
the ball in the center of the field. M. A. C. fum- 
bled, but Roberts got the ball; Philbrick made 5 
yards ; Cobb punted to Shattuck, who was stopped on 
the Amherst 25 yard line. Haldeman failed to gain . 
Shuttuck made 8 yards. Time was then called with 
the ball on Amherst's 30 yard line. 

Shattuck opened the second half by kicking off to 
Philbrick who ran the ball back to the 25 yard line. 
Philbrick then made 3 yards, but the ball was fumbled 
on the next play and Campbell fell on it for Amherst. 
Haldeman made 6 yards; Shattuck failed to gain on 
a quarterback run, and then attempted a field goal 
from the 37 yard line, but the ball fell short, and Cobb 
got it on the M. A. C. 10 yard line. Cobb punted 
to the center of the field, Massachusetts got the ball 
on an attempted forward pass. After Philbrick had 
made 2 yards, Cobb punted to Shattuck on Amherst's 
30 yard line. Shattuck made 3 yards, and the onside 
kick was worked for 10 yards. Amherst gained but 
2 yards in the next two attempts, and Shattuck 
kicked to Cobb on Amherst 45 yard line. Blaney 
made 5 yards, Philbrick 2 and then another 3 yards. 
Roberts couldn't gain; M. A. C. was penalized 15 
yards for holding. Cobb then got off a beautiful 
spiral punt which went over Shattuck 's head and over 
the goal line. Amherst kicked out from the 25 yard 
line to Cobb, who by clever dodging ran the ball into 
the middle of the field. Cobb got off another good 
punt, the man being tackled on Amherst 15 yard line. 
Shattuck punted to Cobb, who again did some good 
side-stepping and ran the ball back 25 yards to the 
Amherst 15 yard line. M. A. C. couldn't gain in 



two downs and Cobb tried a drop-kick, but the ball 
rolled to the Amherst 2 yard line where Turner fell on 
it. The ball was given to Amherst on her own 10 
yard line. Amherst gained 15 yards before Shattuck 
was forced to punt. Amherst was off side and was 
penalized. This made it Amherst ball on the Amherst 
5 yard line. Shattuck punted to Cobb on Amherst 
30 yard line ; Roberts made 5 yards, Philbrick made 
2. Cobb tried for another drop-kick, from the 27 
yard line, but failed. Amherst got the ball on her 30 
yard line. Amherst made 10 yards and then failed to 
gain in two tries, and Shattuck punted to Cobb who 
ran the ball in 20 yards to the middle of the field. 
After Blaney had made 5 yards. Cobb punted to 
Shuttuck on his 30 yard line where he was downed in 
his tracks. After two short gains, Amherst made 8 
yards on a forward pass. Time was called with the 
ball on Amherst 40 yard line. 
The line-up: 



M. A. C. 

Leonard, r. e. 
Sexton, r. t. 
Crosby, r. g. 
Page. c. 
Anderson. 1. g. 
Farley. 1. t. 
Turner. 1. e. 
Cobb. q. b. 
Blaney. r. h. b. 
Roberts. 1. h. b. 
Philbrick. f. b. 

Score — M. A. C. 0. 



AMHERST. 

I. e.. Keating. Danahey 

1. t . Kilbourn 

1. g.. Buck 

c, Gildersleeve 

r. g.. Mulry 

r. t.. Haldeman, Post 

r. e.. Keith 

q. b., Curby, Shattuck 

I. h. b.. Shuttuck.. Atwood 

r. h. b.. Blades, Haldeman. Frank 

f. b., Campbell, Smith 

Amherst. 0. — Referee — Weeks, Syra- 



cuse. Umpire — Langford. Trinity. Field Judge — Dadmun. 
Worcester. Linesmen— Leadbetter of Amherst. Barry of 
M. A. C. Head linesman — Berry of Springfield Training 
School. Time — 25 minute halves. 

M. A. C, 19; Tufts, 10. 
The football team defeated Tufts, last Saturday, 
at Medford, in an intensely interesting and spectacular 
game. The play was decidedly open, quarter back 
runs, forward passes, fake punts, on-side kicks, beau- 
tiful spiral punts, drop-kicks, place kicks, and weird- 
looking formations, all coming in rapid succession. 
Tufts especially had a choice repertoire of trick plays 
and gained most of her distance in this way. In 
most of them, Green, the Tufts captain, was given the 
ball, and he was always a hard man to put down. 
Time after time he would shake off all but the last 
man between him and the open field. His end run for 



45 yards was the longest run of the day and resulted 
in giving Tufts her only touchdown, as the ball was 
easily pushed over in the next two plays. He also 
contributed to Tufts' score by making a wonderful place 
kick from the 45 yard line. Hooper, Wallace and 
Chase also performed well for Tufts. Massachusetts 
played a magnificent game on defense. The line 
always held and the ends and half-backs were always 
on hand to stop the speedy Tufts backs when they 
tried to go around the ends. The defense was espec- 
ially strong against the forward pass. The Medford 
team tried the play repeatedly, but only once did a 
Tufts man get the ball and then only to be downed In his 
tracks. Several times a Massachusetts man would 
jump high in the air and get the ball just as it was 
about to drop into the arms of the waiting Tufts man, 
and once Leonard grabbed it in this way and ran for a 
touchdown. The work of Captain Cobb was the 
feature of the game. Two of his long spiral punts 
sailed away for sixty yards before touching the ground 
and one rolled for a total distance of seventy yards. 
His first two tries for field goals were successful, the 
ball going over the middle of the bar each time. On 
a third attempt the ball started well but was blocked. 
He received difficult punts without a slip up and used 
excellent judgment in running the team. Turner 
played a fast game at end and blocked a kick which 
resulted in a touchdown for M. A. C. Roberts and 
Blaney were the best grond gainers for Massachusetts 
and Roberts also played a great game on defense, 
making tackle after tackle in the open field. 

Every man on the team displayed the fighting spirit 
which has characterized the work of the team this 
fall. Every chance was seized, every man fought 
fiercely for every inch that might be gained. 

The only unpleasant feature of the contest was the 
constant wrangling during the first half between 
players and officials and between the officials them- 
selves. The officials seemed to be determined that 
M. A. C. should not win, and penalized her 75 yards 
in the first half alone. The offense was said to be 
"holding" but it was impossible to find out who was 
doing it. Tufts was penalized 15 yards for being off 
side. 

A large crowd of Massachusetts undergraduates, 
graduates and sympathizers attended the game and 
cheered almost continously. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



In 



Massachusetts scored first. After the ball had 
changed hands several times, Tufts tried to work a 
forward pass, but Captain Cobb got the ball. Phil- 
brick gained 4 yards but M. A. C. was then penal- 
ized 15 yards for holding and Cobb punted. Tufts 
then made 15 yards but was offside and was penalized 
15 yards. Tufts punted on the next play but Turner 
broke through and blocked the punt and Crosby fell 
on the ball for a touchdown as it rolled over the line. 
Cobb failed to kick the goal. The ball then zig-zag- 
ged back and fourth for some time. M.A.C. worked 
it up to the Tufts 35 yard line and was penalized for 
holding. Blaney then made 10 yards on a cross 
tackle play. Roberts made 10 more. Cobb then 
shot the ball to Leonard for a gain of 10 yards. 
Blaney was then thrown for a loss. Captain Cobb 
kicked a goal from the 20 yard line. Near the 
end of the half Tufts punted the ball into M. A. C. 
territory and a 15 yard penalty for holding brought it 
to the 5 yard line. Cobb then punted to Green, who 
made a fair catch on the M. A. C. 45 yard line. 
Then by a splendid kick he sent it across the bar for 
Tufts first score. Time was then called. Score 
Massachusetts 9, Tufts 4. 

Cobb opened the second half by kicking over the line. 
Tufts kick out from the 25 yard line, the ball going 
outside at the 35 yard line. M. A. C. lost ball on a 
fumble. Tufts then tried the forward pass, but Cobb 
got the ball in the center of the field. After two tries 
which netted 6 yards, Cobb punted to Green on Tufts' 
3 yard line. After gaining 13 yards Green punted to 
Cobb who ran the ball in to the Tufts 40 yard line. 
Blaney made 10 yards. Philbrick couldn't gain, and 
Captain Cobb then kicked a pretty goal from the 30 
yard line. Cobb kicked off to Tufts on the 25 yard line. 
Tufts failed to gain in two tries and then lost 15 yards 
on a forward pass that hit the ground first. Green then 
made a long punt to Cobb on the M. A. C. 50 yard 
line. The Tufts line was then ripped up for gains of 
5 and 10 yards at a time with Philbrick and Blaney 
carrying the ball until it rested on the Tufts 30 yard 
line. Here Cobb tried for another goal, but the kick 
was blocked. After a few short gains Tufts gained 
30 yards on a trick play around the end. Green 
then attempted a drop kick from the 35 yard line but 
the ball went wide of the goal. Cobb kicked out 
from the 25 yard line and Tufts ran the ball in to the 



center of the field. After two short gains Green made 
a long end run on a trick play, placing the ball on 
the M. A. C. 7 yard line. In two plays Tufts carried 
it across for a touchdown. Green kicked the goal. 
Score Tufts 10, M. A. C. 13. Green kicked off to 
Philbrick who ran the ball in to the 25 yard line. 
Roberts made 12 yards on the first rush. Blaney 
made 5 and Philbrick 1 yard more. Cobb got off a 
long punt which Green caught and by clever running 
placed it on Tufts 40 yard line. Tufts couldn't gain 
and punted to Roberts on Massachusetts' 45 yard 
line. Cobb punted to Green who carried the ball to 
his 30 yard line. Green then tried a quarterback run 
but was thrown for a loss. On the next play Leonard 
intercepted a forward pass; grabbed the ball and ran 
over the line for a touchdown. Cobb kicked goal. 
Score M. A. C. 19, Tufts 10. Green kicked off to 
Blaney who carried the ball to the 30 yard line. 
Cobb punted to Tufts in center of the field. Tufts 
couldn't gain 10 yards in three tries and it was Mas- 
sachusetts' ball on her own fifty yard line. Turner 
made a short gain. Cobb then stepped back to his 
45 yard line and got away the prettiest punt of the 
day ; Sheehy catching it on Tufts 5 yard line and run- 
ning it back 10 yards to the 15 yard line. Green 
failed to work a forward pass just as time was called. 
Final score Massachusetts 19, Tufts 10. 
The line-up : 

TUFTS. 



Colleg? Notts- 



M. A. C. 

Turner. 1. e. 

Farley. 1. 1. 

Anderson. Johnson. 1. g. 

Paige, c. 

Crosby, r g. 

Sexton, r. t. 

Leonard, r. e. 

Cobb, q. b. 

Roberts. 1. h. b. 

Blaney, r. h. b. 

Philbrick, f. b. 

Score— M. A. C. 19. Tufts 10. Touchdowns— Turner. 
Leonard, Hooper. Field goals— Cobb 2, Green. Goals from 
touchdowns— Cobb 2. Green. Umpire— Boyle of Dan 
mouth. Referee— Dr. Collins. Field judge— J. E. O'Con 
nell of Harvard. Linesman— Prince. Time— 30 and 25 
minute halves. 



r. e.. Wilson 

r. t.. Chase 

r. j;.. Houston 

c. Ireland 

I. g . Burt 

1. L. Marr 

I.e.. Hubbard, Kinsella 

q. b.. Green 

r. h. b., Wallace, Nesmith 

1. h. b. Sheehy 

f, b., Hooper 



The seniors electing agriculture began dairy prac 
tice last week under Mr. Hunting, separating; Mr. 
Parsons, testing ; and Mr. Langwill, butter-making. 



Rev. J. P. Kennedy of Holyoke conducted the 
vesper services Sunday, Nov. 10. 

The regular meeting of the Y. M. C. A., Nov. 7, 
was addressed by Prof. F. A. Waugh. 

Rev. David Sprague of Grace Episcopal church, 
Amherst, conducted chapel services, Nov. 7. 

The Vesper services Sunday, Nov. 3, were con- 
ducted by Principal Melden of Wesleyan Academy, 
Wilbraham. 

A set of views of the college has been sent to Mt. 
Hermon School to be placed with a collection of 
views of many colleges and universities. 

The senior class in floriculture visited the green- 
houses and grounds of Smith College, Nov. 4, pay- 
ing particular attention to Mr. Canning's fine exhibit 
of chrysanthemums. 

The president is preparing estimates for the ex- 
penditure necessary for the complete overhauling and 
refitting of North College. The plans will call for a 
convenient, comfortable, sanitary and up-to-date 
college dormitory. 

The Assemblies from now on will be given over to a 
series of talks upon topics of general interest, the 
speakers to be prominent men in this and neighboring 
states. The president has prepared an attractive 
program for these Assembly exercises. 

A club known as the 'Mettawampe Club" has 
been organized at the college for purpose of promot- 
ing climbing and other healthful out-door exercise at 
the college. A full account of the organization and 
purposes of the club will be given in the next issue of 
the Signal. 

The Kansas State Agricultural College announces 
with evident pride that it will next summer open a 
summer school for school teachers on practically the 
same lines followed at M. A. C. Unquestionably 
this is a good thing ; and since we have in recent 
years fallen into the habit of thinking that the western 
state colleges lead in everything, it is gratifying to 
find an instance in which Massachusetts leads the 
western institutions. 

Announcement has been made that the J. W. D, 
French prize of $25.00 in arboriculture will be offered 



again this year, to be awarded to the student In any 
class presenting the best article on the subject: "A 
Statistical Survey of the Health of Street Trees of the 
Connecticut Valley." The work involved in com- 
petition will include a systematic survey regarding the 
injuries of street trees, by electrical current, telephone 
wires, wind, ice, animals, insects, fungi, etc. 

The following committee of students has been ap- 
pointed by the Senate to care for the Trophy Room, 
and to cooperate with the committee of the faculty in 
making plans for an M. A. C, Social Union: J. R. 
Parker, 1908; S. J. Wright, 1908 ; S. S. Crossman, 
1909; W. H. Turner. 1909; E. F. Damon, 1910 
and W. E. Leonard, 1910. The faculty committee 
consists of Pres. K. L. Butterfield, Dean George F. 
Mills, and E. G. Bartlett. The committee is mak- 
ing plans and estimates for presentation to the Board 
of Trustees. The plans will probably call for the giv- 
ing over of the entire lower floor of North College for 
social purposes, and will include arrangements for a 
billiard room, a reading room for study purposes, a 
lounging room, the present Trophy Room, as well as 
offices for the Athletic Board, the Signal Board, 
Senate, and other college organizations. President 
Butterfield has the matter of an M. A. C. Social 
Union close at heart, and is exceedingly desirous of 
seeing the Union in actual existence in the near future. 



LOCAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION SUPPER. 

The Local Alumni Association of Massachusetts 
Agricultural College held a reunion and banquet Sat- 
urday night. Nov. 2, after the football game with 
Amherst. The reunion was held at Draper Hall, 
Charles E. Rowe catering. An excellent course 
supper was served, the college orchestra furnishing 
music between courses and at other appropriate 
places upon the program. The members of the 
football team were guests of the local alumni. 
After the banquet, cigars were passed around and 
Judge R. W. Lyman of the class of 1871, acting 
as toastmaster, called upon the following speakers: 
President K. L. Butterfield, who spoke among other 
things of the immediate need of an M. A. C. athletic 
field and the plans being made for, and results 
expected from, the formation of a Social Union to 
occupy the lower floor of North College ; T. F. 
Cooke, 1901, principal of Pittsfield High School, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




who contrasted in a sort of reminiscent way the | 
athletic conditions at the college 10 years ago with 
those of today ; Prof. F. S. Howard, '94, secretary 
of the M. A, C. Athletic Board; A. C. Monahan, 
'00. secretary of the Local Alumni Association ; 
Prof. F. A. Waugh of the Division of Horticulture 
who spoke among other things of the necessity of 
getting in more practical work in the courses, and 
plans that are being made to enable students in the 
different courses to get into the actual work for at 
least a few weeks of the year ; K. E. Gillett, '08, 
manager of the football team, who spoke of the grat- 
ification of the coach and management at the way 
the team has showed up this year, particularly in the 
game against far greater odds with Amherst, and gave 
a rough report of the finances of the season ; "Mat" 
Bullock, Dartmouth '03, who emphasized again the 
good work which the team is doing this year, and 
spoke of the way in which he first heard of the col- 
lege, through its gritty and fast football teams ; George 
R. Cobb, '08, captain of the football team, who com- 
mended highly the services of the coach, and the 
spirit and enthusiasm exhibited by the men playing on 
the team and by the student body; Prof. W. R. Hart, 
head of the Normal Department, and F. A. Cutter, 
captain of last year's football team. The following 
were present at the banquet, about 60 plates being 
served: R. W. Lyman. 71, President K. L. But- 
terfield, T. F. Cooke, 01 . W. R. Pierson. 01 ; S. 
F. Howard. '94; K. E. Gillett. '08; M. B. Hatch. 
'05; F. A. Waugh; G. N. Willis. '05; H. F. 
Tompson, '05; Alien N. Swain, '05; Arthur W. 
Hall, Jr.. '06; F. A. Cutter, '07; W. E. Dickin- 
son, '07; J. W. Dellea, '02; E. G. Bartlett. '07 ; 
J. E. Deuel, '92; G. D.Jones, '03; J. G. Cook, 
'05; George D. Barrus, '03; ]. P. Blaney. '10; 
W. E. Leonard, '10; Charles E. Roberts. 'II: E. 
D. Philbrick, '08; D. P. Miller, '08; R. L. Whit- 
ney. "10; P. W. Allen, II; W. E. Adams. '09; 
P. A. Racicot, II ; A. C. Monahan, 00; David 
Barry, '90 ; Matthew W.Bullock, George R.Cobb, '08 ; 
W. R. Hart, Neb. '96: E. A. White. '95; J. A. 
Barri, '75; C. Wellington, '83; E. H Forestall, 
N. H. C. '97; C. M. Hubbard, '92; James B. 
Paige, '82; H. D. Haskins. '90; E. B. Holland, 
'92; George C. Martin; P. H. Smith. '97; E. 
G.Clark. '96; George C Hubbard, '99; H. W. 



Turner, '09; George Paige, '08; George F. Sexton, 
'09; A. J. Farley, '08; J. A. Anderson, '08; H. 
P. Crosby. '09. 



A FEW LETTERS. 

Through the courtesy of Prof. F. S. Howard, sec- 
retary and treasurer of the athletic board, the editor 
is enabled to print the following letters and notes from 
loyal alumni who are still voung at heart and have 
not forgotten the college and her needs. The letters 
are but a representative few of many, all significant 
ot a loyal alumni body: 

Enclosed is a small token in response to your well 
edited circular just received. It speaks a great deal 
for your most excellent work. Success to you and 
the team ! Make // talk ! ! 

L. J. Shepard, '96. 

In answer to your call I send herewith my subscrip- 
tion to the football fund. 

Yours truly, 

Robert W. Lyman. 

M. A. C. has started off well. Here's hoping she 
keeps it up. Here's a liitle to help. 
Yours in M. A. C 

I. C. Poole, '96. 

I enclose check for a contribution to the football 
fund. I hope the team will lick every one of its 
opponents especially Dartmouth, Brown and Amherst. 
Will probably see you this week in Amherst. 

Yours very truly. 

W. H. Bowker, '71. 

Your circular about M. A. C. football this fall 
received. I am interested in M. A. C. athletics and 
so inclose you my check for $5. I hope you will 
have the best team M. A. C. has ever put out, one 
that will play team work. Shall try and see some of 
the games if I possibly can. Would be more than 
pleased to see you Win from Amherst. If you do call 
on me for another $5. I shall be pleased to send It 
you in said case, wishing you the the best of success 
in your work this fall, with kindest regards to all the 
Boys. 1 am yours sincerely, 

Herbert C. Bliss, '88. 

Remember. Team work, square playing, always 
your best, and if you don't always win. we the alumni 
will be proud of you, but win from Amherst. 



Enclose find check $5 for football, the check of 
last June was for baseball. Wishing the boys every 
success in the world, 

Your friend. 

Newton Shultis, '96. 
Enclosed please find $5 for the football fund. I 
shall certainly try and see the Amherst and Springfield 
games— and do all I can to boost the team along. 
Yours very truly, 

John A. Barri, '75. 
Best wishes for a victory on Saturday 2d. Wish I 
could be with you to cheer a bit. 

J. F. Fisher, '71. 

Beat the old college this year and we will double 
the subscription next year. 

M. F. Dickinson. 

Please find check for $5 enclosed. 

W. P. Birnie, 71. 
Please find herewith check for $5. 

James H. Webb, '73. 



THE VISIT OF A BRITISH ENTOMOLOGIST. 

Mr. F. B. Lowe, formerly of the British Museum 
and later, government entomologist of West Australia, 
has been spending a few days at the entomological 
department, where he has been engaged in systematic 
work on the collection of insects of the Gypsy Moth 
Commission, with whom he is now employed. 

Professor Fernald met Mr. Lowe while studying at 
the British Museum in 1889. While in Australia 
Mr. Lowe was engaged in the importation of parasites 
on native insects, and because of his experience with 
parasites and general standing as an entomologist. 
Dr. Howard of the Entomological Bureau invited him 
to come to this country and assist in the importation 
of parasites on the gypsy and brown-tail moths which 
is now being carried on in the eastern part of this 
state. 

Mr. Lowe expressed much surprise at the unusual 
facilities afforded him for advanced work in ento- 
mology, and stated that he knew of no other place 
which possessed greater advantages for entomological 
work. He was amazed, however, that the great 
commonwealth of Massachusetts should allow such a 
great mass of valuable material to be stored in a 
wooden building where the risk of fire is so great. 



He asked if the authorities of the college realized the 
great number of types of insects stored in the building 
and how great a value they had, and that if they were 
destroyed they could never be replaced. These types 
are the original insects from which new descriptions 
are made and published, so are, of course, unique. 
Types in most all other museums are guarded with 
the greatest care and the question comes should we 
not have a new fire-proof building for our entomologi- 
cal department with its valuable collections and all? 



Dfp&rtmfrvf flot?s. 



BOTANY 

All the classes in botany have recently begun work 
in the new laboratories at Clark Hall. There are 
forty seniors who have elected botany this year, this 
being the largest class in senior botany in the history 
of the department. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 

The entire collection of bumble-bees from the Na- 
tional Museum at Washington, has been sent on for 
study by Mr. H. J. Franklin ; also a large number of 
insects of the same group have been received from 
the New Hampshire station for similar study. 

Dr. Fernald recently attended a lecture on Mendel 
ism, by Professor Bateson of Cambridge, England, at 
Harvard College. 

Messrs. Mosher and Lowe of the Gypsy Moth Com- 
mission recently spent several days here In naming 
the collection of insects belonging to the commission 
from the college collection. 

Mr. C. W. Hooker has nearly completed a series 
of experiments on the resistance of cucumbers to dif 
ferent strengths of hydrocyanic-acid gas. 

Mr. H. P. Wood, 1907, has accepted a position 
with the United States Bureau of Entomology. His 
work will be on the cattle-tick, and he will be sta- 
tioned at Dallas, Texas. 

FLORICULTURE. 
The senior class in floriculture took an extended 
trip Friday and Saturday of last week, in the form of 
a practical exercise. Ten members of the class took 
the 7.50 Boston and Maine train on Friday morning, 
stopping off at Wayland, where they took the electric 






IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 



cars for the Waban Rose Conservatories at Natick. 
The morning was profitably spent in a study of rose 
culture as practised at the Waban Conservatories and 
of the species and varieties grown. The class then 
went by trolley to Boston, spending the remainder of 
the afternoon and the evening at the Boston Chrys- 
anthemum Show, studying the types, species and 
varieties. The exhibition was an excellent one, and 
afforded ample opportunity for study. Saturday 
morning the members of the class met by appoint- 
ment at the Arnold Arboretum, Jamaica Plain, and 
spent the morning studying the excellent collection of 
trees and shrubs on exhibition there, paying particular 
attention to the fruit and berry-bearing species. In 
the afternoon the members of the class journeyed to 
Medford, to witness the Tufts game. Prof. E. A. 
White accompanied the class on the trip. 
POMOLOGY. 

Several fine collections of apples, grown in different 
parts of the country, have been received for study by 
the classes in pomology. 

LANDSCAPE. 

At one of the recent horticultural seminars, Profes- 
sor Waugh gave an illustrated lecture on American 
Landscape. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

A bulletin entitled Molasses and Molasses Feeds 
for Farm Stock is now in press. 

Bulletins relative to the inspection of fertilizers and 
feed-stuffs are in process of preparation. 

Mr. W. K. Hepburn has started on the annual tour 
of inspection of the Babcock-test machines in this 

state. 

Mr. Langwill, instructor in butter-making, will co- 
operate with this department in the butter-making 
from the experiment station herd. 

Two excellent books have recently been added to 
the department library; one on Futlermittle, Vol. II, 
by Emil Potts, and the other on Milk Hygenic, by 
Jensens, being translated from the German by Pierson. 



Alu 



mm 



'83. — D. 0. Nourse, for several years connected 
with the Virginia College and Experiment Station, 
has been elected professor of Agriculture at Clemson 
College, South Carolina. 



The Western Society of M. A. C. will hold its 
banquet at the Union League Club, 1 10 East Jack- 
son Boulevard, Chicago. Thursday, Dec. 5, at 7 
o'clock p. m. Representatives from the college 
faculty have been asked to attend. 

Kindly notify the secretary of your intention to be 
present as soon as possible that arrangements may be 
completed. 

Yours very truly, 

M. H. West. '03, Secretary. 

71. — In the recent elections A. D. Norcross of 
Monson was elected state senator from the Hamp- 
shire and Hampden district on the republican ticket. 

78. — Dr. Frederick Tuckerman has just returned 
from the White Mountains were he has been for sev- 
eral months. 

'82. — At a recent bi-monthly meeting of the Life 
Underwriter's association of Western Massachusetts 
Herbert Myrick, president of the Phelps Publishing 
Co., gave an interesting address. Mr. Myrick spoke 
of his early experiences as an agent of the New 
England Homestead and of his struggles during the 
first two years of his business career. He thought 
that the country was in for a reaction in business, but 
added that people needed life insurance more than 
ever and the reaction would probably be short lived. 
He said that there had never been an economic 
depression of long duration in this country and that 
the people should not fear anything disastrous because 
of the present conditions. 

'83, — Samuel M. Holman of Attleboro has been 

re-elected to the General Court from the First District. 

Bristol county. 

'91. — Dr. Harvey T. Shores of Northampton has 
been appointed health inspector for Hampshire and 
Franklin counties. 

'92. — Dr. R. P. Lyman of Hartford, Conn., was 
re-elected secretary at the recent meeting of the 
American Veterinary Medical Association held in 
Kansas City. Dr. Lyman has recently declined a 
position in the Veterinary Department of the Colo- 
rado State College as Professor of Theory and Prac- 
tice of Veterinary Medicine. 

'99.— Prof. D. A. Beaman has recently been 
appointed director of Agriculture of Puerto Rico and 
is at the head of all agricultural work in Puerto Rico. 



'00,— J. W. Kellogg, formerly assistant chemist at 
the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station, has 
resigned to accept a position in the Pennsylvania 
Department of Agriculture in connection with the 
inspection of feeding stuffs. 

02.— Early in August C. I. Lewis was elected 
by the Board of Regent of Washington State College 
to the position of director of the sub-station at Puyal- 
lup. Wash. It is rumored that the consideration was 
in the neighborhood of $2,800. However the presi- 
dent of the Oregon Agricultural College made induce- 
ment of such a nature that Mr. Lewis decided to 
remain in Corvallis, Ore. He has six assistants in 
his work. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis welcomed to their 
home on Oct. 14, a daughter. 

'83. Married July 27, Joseph G. Cook to Miss 
Ethel M. Beers at Billerica. At home at 192 Earl 
St., Northampton. 

'03— C. P. Halligan is assistant coach of the 
football team of the Michigan Agricultural college 
and It is reported that an excellent team is being 
turned out. 

04. — A. L. Peck has been appointed assistant 
hort iculturist in the Kansas Agricultural College and 



Station. He will have charge of experimental work 
on vegetables. 

04.— A. W. Gilbert has resigned his position as 
agriculturist for the University of Maine and is taking 
graduate work at Cornell University. Address, Alpha 
Zeta House, Ithaca. N. Y. 

NINETEEN FIVE. 

G. H. Allen has bought out W. A. Munson in the 
firm of Munson & Whittaker and Is now looking after 
the New York end of the business. 

A. D. Taylor has returned from Europe where he 
has been studying Landscape Gardening during the 
summer months, and will teach this subject at 
Cornell. 

C. S. Holcomb with M. S. Ayer. wholesale grocer, 
State St., Boston. Home address. 15 Grandview 
Ave., Somerville. 

'07. — F. A. Watkins has accepted a position as 
instructor of Agriculture in one of the government 
schools in Puerto Rico and will leave for the scene of 
activities by an early steamer. 

'07. — H. P. Wood has taken a position with the 
Bureau of Entomology. U. S. Department of Agri- 
culture, at Dallas, Tex. 



FADS FOR THE LADS 

arc not to be found in every tailoring shop. You must go to 
a distinctively Young Men's Tailor for the new and "chirk"' 
styles. Our garments are up to every move on Fashion's 
board. No sooner is a fresh idea launched, than we adopt it. 
The precise Autumn and Winter styles of the premier 
tailors of New York and London— you can obtain them here. 
Modern tailoring — moderate prices. 

V\IWa^5 Welcome-bdy or got 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To sht>! your sole. ( 'nine to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

orrosiTK Town Hall. 



It's Your Next at the 



luupsi House hia stop 



Four First Class Barbers 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

; 9 ' Hill Dress Suits to rent. **-StudentB* Clothes bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 



GOODS FOR MEN 



( >pcn Mondays from 


1 A. M. 


to 8 V. M. 


Tuesdays ; 


. M 


6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


i i * 


8 " 


Thursdays, ] 


M 


6 •• 


Fridays, ; 


, a 


8 " 


Saturdays, j 


r " 


1 1 " 




C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. (lloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



CAIV.PION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS 



Rabar's Jrni, 

Old South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, M AS,- 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

BATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



4 For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Poeket Magnifiers for Botanists 



3 Lens 60c 
2 Lens 50c 



OLIVER TYPEWRITER. 



i**3i»aii* »noi». 



13. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Hank, AMHERS1 




CapsandGotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CLASS. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 



COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , Nkw York. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

( annot he Manufactured. 
It in a Natural Manure. 

thoir* Strony, \'iti<m>usjl,althy /'/ant* Thai i:>:<i»t Disrasr 

Dlt. OBOB0I B. STONE. Professor of Botany at the Ma»» 

AkiI> iiHuihI l ollegt , iinil Professor ol Plant 1>1m' ai-e* lit I lie 
Hutcli rxpcrlinenl station, Amherst, Mass, writes to our 
Agricultural Expert uh follows 

•I will say that I consider the formula which you 
prepared lot Mr. Prcscott ami applied by him on hi* 
he.iH wa- \ ei > effectual In coutr..lliiiK the asparagus 
rust. The application of your formula and other fea 
turea which were carried out In the management of 
these beds convince me that it constituted the beat 
demonstration of the control of asparagus rui«t which 
has ever been made in thin country." 

aranHNI PERI'VIAN GUA^O formed the basis of the 
above mentioned formula. It wan used on the asparagus tieds 
<>f C, W. I'krscott., Concord, Mass., the larKest individual 
grower of Asparagus in New England. We also offer 

wr. also orritK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from New York, Boston, 

Mass., and Charleston, 8. c. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant hood 

Problems," is sent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Sole Importers for CM. of Genuine Peruvian Guano, and 
Manufacturer of High tirade Fertilisers. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 




In order to obtain 
the best results in ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Hall, Foot 
Bail, Basket Ball, 
KunningShoes.Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
—our trademark means something. 

send lor our Catalogue. It is free toany address. 

WRIGHT «Sfe DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

ll WEST 30TH ST.. NKW VORK 

CMICAOO Pkoviden' k, K. I. CAMMIMb, Mass. 




/ 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars. Noted for It* excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



w. w. BOTsrxosr, 

MANUFACTuEEB OP 

SODA WTATERS, 

Pineapple Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountain* charged t* order. 



KITES STEEET, 



Northampton, Mass. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

IIhx received the latest fabrics for the spring ami NJMMf 
trade of '07 in OdtlNNi'l Garment*. AIho does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 



'Military Work a Specialty.. 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhbrst, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD &0BNER DRUB STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything Mew and Up-to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

1). H. KENDRICK, Projrrietor. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpel Renovating, Establishment. 

M.Jkv.O. Jkmn* H.M.JENN1HON, •«.>•» 



Get Sample Rates far Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
•• •« Thursday delivered Saturday. 

yErSATISFAOTION OUARANTBBD. %'cf' 

a. A. UTLJCT, Maumgfr. 

OFFICE: 

Esusrt Pleasant Street. 



Herbarium and Botany Supplies, 

SEAL STATIONERY, 

CANDY, TONIC, ETC. 



A I THE 



COLLEGE STORE. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



A 1 •♦■fill Omaiiirnt. 

The most pleasing article of house furnishing to the eye, 
and the uiost useful to the housewife, is the New Home 
Sswnra Machine. Install one at MMM am! make your sewing 
t- a-n Dealers everywhere. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, I). 1). S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, 4HIIKKST, MAN 



O. «. GATES, I3.13.fc*. 

DENTALt ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK AM HERST. M ASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. TJ. 5. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK AMHKKST, MASS 

OFFICE HOUU 
B TO 12 A.. M., 1-30 TO 6 J». M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gaa administered when desired. 

THURBEIR'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHKKST. MASS. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 

For ONE WEEK Beginning Oct. 28th 

SPECIAL SALE OF 

M. A. C. Pennants and Pillow Tops. 

move: on to the 



Connecticut valley street Baiiway Go. 

AMHEKST DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Amherst ami Northampton on the hour tt.i 
half hour from S.S0 a.m. till 10.30 p.m. Sundays the first car 
will leave at s .:sn a. m. 

Main Office, Ureenfielo. Mass. 
John A.Taggart, Supt. 

Northampton (ihi.k, 10a Main St. 
0. W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. 

Tslephone, Northampton, 195. IS. 



C. R. ELDER, 



SELLS 



GOOD COAL 



AT RIGHT PRICES. 



Amherst k Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 ami 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Care at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 

Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO OCT. H, ISOU. 



SOUTH BOUND 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamer*. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, ami 
6.27 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. K. BKNTLKY, 

(ieueral Passenger Agent, 

St. Alhans, Vt. 









*•»» 



!' 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

Now ready for the Football Season, also suitabe 
for Informals. 

See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, M. A. C. 

Telephone. 




PHOTOGKAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



Author E. Dokk L. H. Toubtklottk 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLK8AI.E l.EALKKS AND JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

M2 Main Street, - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO. 




THK LAKOK8T COI.LKUK KNGKAV- 
INC. HOU8K IN THE WORLD. 

Works: 1711. Street &LehighAve. 

G PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS 



,J. H.TROTT 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



PIUIMB. STEflUl & BUS FITTER, 

Ml) DEALER II STOVES 8KB IJIK3. 



Shop 15 i-j North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-u. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Order* Left at Amherst llou« Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNlTUREjND CARPET STORE. 



A COMI'LRTK LINK OF GOODS 
MTTKI) TO THB STUDENTS* WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest J'rnes. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix Row, 



Amhkrst, Mass. 



L^ XI* I • • • • 

"BILL' 

PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Freshing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Hairs of Hants Hressed for J1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST.. OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINK OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. 



Daily and Sunday Papers. 



K9TAHL18HKD 1XM. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. IHth Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTKBS AMI* M AHlIKAt TUKKUft M 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY QOOXDS. 



We handle the item of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

Kuropean Plan, Rooms with Rath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

KINK CAKK OPKN I'NTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. ROWKKR & CO. 



CAKWKfa 4 Aokhou«. 



MtiMras, 



AMHa$f , ftASS, 



j 





-4^*< TH E I « 

flfeaesacbusetts 
Hgricultural 

(Lolleae 



ANI» 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



SHORT COURSES »» follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bke Culture. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year: Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Bltterfield, Amherst, Mass. 






t 



/:■ 



TIE COLLEGE SMIL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 5 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 27. 1907 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, IHAJIDOIilH, GUITAR STRINGS. 



FINISH 





OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 
TO .... 

Page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONET 

to pay college expenses. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Block, - . AMHERST. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. NOVEMBER 27, 1907 



NO. 5 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Coixsos Signal. Am hirst, Mass. Thb Siomal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK, 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Assistant Ed'tor. 

O. B. BR1CCS. 1909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. O. B. BRICCS, 1909, Alumni Notes. 

J. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletics. W. E. ADAMS. 1909. Special. 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908, College Notes. E. F. DAMON, 1910 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. W. R. CLARK. 1910. 



Terms i $1.00 per near in adoance. Single Copies, lOc. Postage outside of United States and Csnada. X»c. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Athletic Association, 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. 

K. E. Cillett. Manager. 
. H. M. Jennison. Manager. 

S. S. Crossman. Manager. 
College Senate, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President 



J. R. Parker . Pres. 
R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 

C. H. White. Pres. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



In the editorial comment which follows the editor 
brings up a subject which may at first thought seem 
a dead issue. The question is relative to the name 
by which the college is popularly known. Let it be 
said right here that the name of the college is and 
always will be Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Popularly the college has been called "Aggie," it 
being perfectly evident that the full name of the col- 
lege is unwieldy in every day conversation. Seven 
years ago a student agitation resulted in the abolition 
of "Aggie" and the substitution of "Massachusetts." 
So the student body of today has been brought up in 
the "Mass'chusetts" atmosphere, while the outside 
world, and the alumni particularly, have retained the 
"Aggie." And "Aggie" has, especially in the last 
year, gradually intruded itself back into the student 
body, replacing "Massachusetts," and winning a place 
in the affections of the college students. If this is 
indeed so, will not the question work itself out without 
any further agitation? No. To keep pace with the 



rapid growth which our college Is experiencing, every 
atom of strength, unity and vitality must be kept 
trained upon the best interests of the college. The 
alumni of an institution determine in great part its 
strength. Can we afford to leave any cause of dif- 
ference between the alumni of this college and its 
student body unsettled? The action of seven years 
ago cut deeply at the affections and early associations 
of the older alumni, and that wound is still fresh in 
many hearts which nevertheless still beat loyally for 
the college. Can we offer a remedy? The editor 
invites communications upon the subject, the only 
stipulation being that communicants shall sign their 
names and show a fair knowledge and generous treat- 
ment of the subject. The matter which follows Is 
but imperfectly put together, but the ideas are there, 
and the editor suggests that two readings will give a 
better comprehension of the subject than one. Think 
about it, talk about it, and then let's see what we can 
do about it. The history of the movement towards 
the abolition of the term "Aggie" and the substitu- 
sion of "Massachusetts" is as follows, the record 



/' 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



/ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



i 






being taken from the files of the Aggie Life and the 
College Signal: 

Vol. XI, No. 11, April 24, 1901, : A new board of 
editors is in charge of the Aggie Life and in this 
the first issue of the new board appears a short edi- 
torial by the editor-in-chief, H. L. Knight, which 
suggests in a conservative way that serious consider- 
ation be given the question of abolishing the term 

"Aggie." 

No. 12, the next issue, contains copies of three 
letters from prominent alumni expressing in no uncer- 
tain terms their disapproval of any attempt to abolish 

"Aggie." 

No. 13 contains numerous other letters from 
alumni expressing sentiment in favor of the term 
"Aggie" and emphasizing the inadvisability of an 
attempt to do away with the name. In an editorial 
the editor requests that the letters be read carefully, 
and that no hasty action be taken in the matter of 
abolishing the time honored "Aggie." 

No. 14: evidently the storm of disapproval has over- 
whelmed the sentiment against "Aggie," and this 
issue makes no mention of the matter whatever. 
Nor do the three remaining issues of the collegiate 
year take up the question again. It is noticeable that 
meanwhile the college is invariably referred to as 
Aggie, in athletic write-ups and other subject matter, 
the name being written without quotation marks. 

Vol. XIII, No. 1, Oct. 2, 1901, the first issue of 
the next college year, contains an editorial (the same 
editorial staff is in charge) endorsing fully the appoint- 
ment of three seniors (by whom appointed is not 
specified) for the purpose of getting up a new yell. 
The old yells are emphatically objected to on the 
grounds that they "referred to the college as Aggie, 
entirely neglecting tne word Massachusetts." It is 
pointed out that the new yell (printed in another 
column of the same issue) replaces Aggie with Mass- 
achusetts, "in grateful recognition of what the old 
Bay State has done and is doing for our college." 
In the same issue, Aggie appears for the first time 
in quotation marks, the editor evidently not quite 
knowing just how to disignate the college. The com- 
mittee which invented the new yell (our present 
"long yell") was H. L. Knight (editor), R. W. 
Morse and L. C. Claflin. Evidently the editor is 
a leading spirit in the revolution. 



No. 2, the next issue, contains a short editorial 
wherein appears for the first time the term Massachu- 
setts as referring to the college, and a strong dictum 
that hereafter the college shall be thus spoken of. 
In the summaries under athletics Massachusetts 
appears instead of Aggie. In truth, the only sign of 
the old Aggie of a few months ago is in the title of 
the paper. 

No. 3, Nov. 6, is entirely disguised in a new 
cover bearing the title "The College Signal." A 
strong and well written editorial explains that by vote 
of the student body, 115 to 4, the name "Aggie" 
shall be excluded from all publications (including the 
public press.) The Aggie Life, under pressure of this 
dictum, must needs conform to sentiment, and con- 
sequently the name of the college paper has been 
changed to The College Signal, a name proposed 
by W. A. Smith, 1904. It is evident that meanwhile 
the alumni have been severely criticizing the action 
of the student body in changing the yell, for the edi- 
tor makes a fine defense, pointing out that the term 
•'Aggie" is chiefly offensive in that it is invariably 
coupled with Amherst, indicating that the general 
impression among outsiders is that the "Amherst 
Aggies'* are a sort of scrub department of Amherst 
College, and their football team a scrub maintained 
in opposition to the regular Amherst 'Varsity. The 
newspapers of the day give the "Amherst Aggies" 
credit for putting up a much better game of football 
than the regular Amherst 'Varsity put up. The editor 
is confident that the substitution of Massachusetts for 
"Aggie" and the M for the A will speedily rectify 
this general error, and the college be known distinct- 
ively. A letter in this issue brings out the fact that 
murmurings against the term "Aggie" were heard as 
far back as 1896. An appeal for a college song is 

made. 

No. 4 contains a fine editorial in defense and 
answer to numerous alumni correspondents, wherein 
it is pointed out that "Aggie" is not distinctive, for 
there are 40 other "Aggie" colleges in the country. 
M. A. C. is not distinctive, for at least five other 
colleges are so designated. By elimination, therefore, 
"Massachusetts" is the only distinctive name where- 
by the college may be known. The editor evidently 
has failed to ask himself the question which outsiders 
must invariably ask "Massachusetts what?" (Why, 



Aggie, of course!) The Aggie Life is generally 
taken to be a high school publication, and hence the 
wisdom of changing to a name which, though in many 
ways unsatisfactory, at least signifies the collegiate 
standing of the institution. The Signal supposedly 
refers to the pennant. 

No. 5 repudiates any suggestion that an effort is 
being made to change the name of the college to 
Massachusetts State College. It is distinctly pointed 
out that the student body could not presume to have 
any say whatever on such a question, which is 
obviously a matter for the trustees to act upon, If 
indeed it were offered for consideration. A rather 
sharp criticism appears in this issue of certain loyal 
alumni who persisted in giving the old "Aggie" yell 
at a football game with Tufts. 

No. 6 offers still further defense of recent changes, 
remarking "But how is a stranger reading of the 
'Amherst Aggies' going to know that Massachusetts 
Agricultural College is meant?" 

Nos. 7 and 8 came out strongly in criticism of a 
spreading agitation in Ihe student body toward the 
substitution of Massachusetts State College. 

No. 9 has nothing whatever to say in further 
defense, and No. 10 seems to be fully occupied with 
a discussion of co-education for the college, and a 
scathing criticism of the \9Q3 Index. Another appeal 
for a college song is made. 

No. 11 is the product of a new board of editors. 
The new editor in-chief commends heartily the retired 
editor for his strenuous labors toward the abol'tion of 
"Aggie," but in the same breath gives him a severe 
jolt for criticizing the 1903 Index. From now on the 
"Aggie" vs. "Massachusetts" question seems to 
be a dead issue from a student point of view. In 
November, 1903 appear the words of a new college 
song, written by H. L. Knight, and later, in Decem- 
ber, the music is presented by Ben Chadwick. Let 
it be said here that the present college song is a mas- 
terpiece and must commend itself to all who have 
heard it. Its sentiment is fine and inspiring, and 
may be subscribed in by students and alumni. 

But while we students of today, being brought up 
in the "Massachusetts" atmosphere, are apt perhaps 
to consider the "Aggie" question a dead one, yet it 
has been forced home upon the present editor that, 
from the alumni point of view, the corpse is still 



rather animated. The older alumni, those who 
shared the early struggles of the college for recogni- 
tion, and who today we point to as the best products 
of the college, have not given up and never will give 
up the dear old Aggie of their college days. And, 
too, we students of today are witnessing the reaction 
of that stern indictment of 1901 and 1902 against 
"Aggie." In our conversation we but rarely attempt 
to mouth the word "Massachusetts," but have rather 
slipped into the habit of referring to the college as 
"Aggie," half in gentle good nature and half In rev- 
erence. It was a relieved student body which list- 
ened to an answering yell at the recent game with 
Amherst for "Aggie, Aggie, Aggie," remembering 
what an awful handling the ungainly "Massachusetts" 
suffered at the same hands the year previous. The 
newspapers have proved to us conclusively that, 
especially in athletic write-ups, Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College in print is impossible, that Mass'chu- 
setts signifies nothing, that Massachusetts A. C. and 
M. A. C. may mean many things from Massachu- 
setts Athletic Club to Michigan Agricultural College, 
while Massachusetts "Aggies" — the accepted nomen- 
clature of today's papers — means — just us. So 
then, hav'nt the newspapers solved our problem for 
us? I am assuming that, though the college is offer- 
ing more and more each year excellent and popular 
courses which have become quite estranged from the 
original and narrow agricultural idea, there Is not that 
sickly fear among the undergraduates today of being 
called a "farmer" because one comes from an 
"Aggie" college, when in reality one is an expert 
botanist, entomologist, pomologist, forester, engineer, 
chemist, landscape-gardener, or sundry other things, 
all of which specialties the college devotes as much 
care to as she does to farming. We believe in the 
dignity of the agricultural Idea, and recognize Its 
scope, and how, finally, all wealth and all prosperity 
are dependent upon it, Our "Aggie" may signify 
much, and what care we if the unenlightened do not 
understand ? And just one word right here. You 
couldn't stamp out the name "Aggie," even if you 
wished to. The fame of the college has spread far 
and wide during these recent years, and everywhere, 
In a popular way, as "Aggie." That solemn ultima- 
tum of 1901 that "Aggie shall be excluded from ail 
publications" was never heard of beyond the town 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




printing press which Issues the college paper. But 
the press in general has adopted a distinctive term, 
"Massachusetts Aggie," a name which will stick 
and which serves the purpose In an entirely satisfac- 
tory way. We have all submitted to a quizzing such 
as the following: "Do you go to college?" "Yes, 
out to Mass'chusetts." "Urn . . . Massachusetts!" 
"Yes, Massachusetts Agricultural College." "Oh! 
... er ---- let's see." "Aggie." "Oh! Aggie! 
Is that so, are you out there? How do you like it ?" 
Perhaps you have experienced having mail addressed 
to you at "Amherst College, Agricultural Dept." 
At present rate of growth, the near future may well 
develop a phase of the question wherein our down- 
town cousins may be annoyed by having their mail 
addressed to "M. A. C, Academic Dept." The 
point is this : the little misunderstandings are rapidly 
explaining themselves away. 

This whole article were purposeless without some 
application of the sentiments Involved to the col- 
lege life of today. And the application is this. By 
far the greater proportion of Aggie's loyal alumni 
have attached a reverent and beautiful sentiment to 
the name "Aggie," a sentiment which it was auda- 
cious and heartless to ever ask them to give up, and 
in truth which they are loyal enough never to give up. 
The fact that today there is but very little student 
sentiment against "Aggie" indicates that the time 
has come when students and alumni can once more 
get together on the good old "Aggie" basis, and 
wipe out any hard feeling which may have justly 
existed. Our alumni are Intensely loyal. Was it 
J. P. Morgan who said "Adversity strengthens the 
bonds of affection?" With such a loyal alumni body, 
it Is a matter of keen regret that any action was ever 
taken toward stamping out the affectionate name 
which binds the old men to the college. It was a 
blow aimed unwittingly at the heart of the college 
life. That it never was successful in its purpose is 
proof enough that it should never have been struck. 
And yet let me say right here that the agitators of 
the movement were sincere, goaded on by misunder- 
standings which cut to the quick of college pride and 
individualism. Their action was not groundless. 
But today witnesses a new state of affairs. 

College sentiment expresses itself in three ways, — 
in cheer, in song and in the colums of the college 



paper. We have observed the working out of college 
sentiment In 1901-1902. If we are to meet the 
alumni on an equal footing today we must recognize 
the same three methods of accomplishing it. As for 
the college paper, enough has been said to Indicate 
an attitude toward the adoption of "Massachusetts 
Aggie" as a necessary and desirable policy. It is 
probable, however, that "Massachusetts" will be 
used in athletic summaries, etc., for the simple 
reason that we are more accustomed to its use, and 
also because it is unquestionably the distinctive adjec- 
tive in the adopted as well as the official name of the 
college. The name of the college paper must 
remain the same for the present at least. The name 
of a college paper must ideally be distinctive of the 
college where it is issued. The College Signal is 
not distinctive, The Aggie Life was perhaps even 
less distinctive ; a satisfactory distinctive name has 
never been proposed. The College Signal, printed 
as it is, with Massachusetts Agricultural College In 
large type across the cover page, must serve the pur- 
pose, and in fact is on the whole satisfactory. 

The present college song, as stated before, Is a 
masterpiece, voicing a sentiment which both alumni 
and students subscribe to. Unfortunately It is the 
only college song we have ; the past has bequeathed 
us nothing else save a few parodies, and the present 
has developed but an inferior grade of original music 
and verse. If we are truly sincere, the future should 
develop songs which shall pay tribute to "Aggie" as 
well as "Massachusetts" — both terms are needed to 
make a truly distinctive song. 

As for the present "Mass'chusetts" yells, they are 
ideal in that they offer opportunity for the greatest 
possible volume and "snappiness" in the yelling. 
This is the prime requisite in college cheers today, 
and as the years go by colleges change their yells for 
others which offer better possibilities. The old 
"Aggie" yell was not an ideal yell, judged by present 
standards. There is just one trouble with the present 
"Mass'chusetts" yell. The question invariably pre- 
sents itself to an outsider "Mass'chusetts what?" 
And advertising ourselves as we do at other colleges 
as simply "Mass'chusetts," the opposing cheering 
section either makes a bad mess of trying to mouth 
"Massachusetts," or else yells for "Aggie," or not 
infrequently for "Amherst." And as If this were not 



5 



enough, the referee and field judges insist on such 
remarks as "Amherst's ball." "Massachusetts" 
what? Why "Aggie," and you. would have no 
trouble whatever. The "Aggie" furnishes the cue. 
So why not modify the present long yell by one little 
substitution \ 

Mass, Mass, Mass'chusetts. 

Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Aggie ! 

Team, Team, Team. 

And for a short yell, how would this go? 

Mass chusetts 

Rah ! Rah ! 

Aggie ! 
Cap, Cap, Cap. 
The writer believes that while these or similar 
yells will answer the prime requisites of volume of 
sound and "snappiness" they will also be intelligible 
to outsiders and indicate an institution, a known insti- 
tution, known Invariably and irrevocably as "Aggie,'' 
or more distinctively, as "Massachusetts Aggie." 
It may be remarked In parenthesis that "Aggie" in 
the yell should not be drawn out, but should be cut 
short and sharp. Wm. H. Bowker, 1871. offers a 
prize of $ 1 for an improved college yell. Let us, 
then, meet these loyal alumni half way, In the same 
spirit with which they support the college athletic 
teams and other organizations. The grounds upon 
which the meeting may take place are common 
grounds — all parties concerned are interested In the 
same purpose, a stronger, more united Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



Athletic No-tts. 



FOOTBALL 

With the victory over S. T. S. Nov. 16, there 
came to a close one of the most successful football 
seasons Massachusetts Agricultural College has ever 
experienced. Out of nine games played five have 
been won, one tied, and three lost. The only teams 
to win from M. A, C. were Williams, Brown and 
Dartmouth, who were played during the first two 
weeks of the season. The combined score of all 
three was but 1 6 points while in former years Brown 
alone has always run up over that number. All 



through the season the team has shown wonderful 
defensive work and has kept the total number of 
points scored by opponents down to 31 while the team 
itself has scored a total of 79 points. To this splendid 
work on defense and to the kicking ability of Captain 
Cobb a large share of the season's success is due. 
Coach Bullock is to be highly praised for building up 
such a strong defense as he succeeded In doing. 

Although the team loses five men by graduation 
this year, yet a strong team will be left for next year. 
A number of freshman are showing up remarkably 
well, and if next year's class brings any material at 
all the chances for a successful team next year are 
very bright, 

Scores for 
Massachusetts 4, 



Massachusetts 0. 
Massachusetts 12, 
Massachusetts 0, 
Massachusetts 10, 
Massachusetts 29, 
Massachusetts 0, 
Massachusetts 19, 
Massachusetts 5. 

Freshman, 



1907. 

Williams 5. 
Brown 5. 
R. I, State 0. 
Dartmouth 6. 
Holy Cross 5. 
W. P. I. 0. 
Amherst 0. 
Tufts 10. 
S. T. S. 0. 
Sophomores, 0. 



The sophomore and freshman class football teams 
at the Massachusetts Agricultural college struggled 
for 40 minutes Nov. 21 without being able to score. 
The game was played in a drizzling rain which made 
fumbling frequent. Although the sophomores did not 
win, they had a decided advantage throughout the 
game. The sophomore goal was never In danger, 
while the freshmen were at the point of being scored 
upon when a fumble saved them. Both sides played 
cleanly for a class game and but few penalties were 
inflicted. The classes supported their teams by 
cheering continuously throughout the game. The 
nearest the sophomores came to scoring was in the 
first half. Schermerhorn got off a long punt, the 
freshmen getting the ball on their 7-yard line. The 
freshmen gained a few yards and then fumbled, the 
sophomores getting the ball on the 1911 5-yard line, 
The sophomores failed to gain on the first down, but 
on the next try McGraw carried the ball to the line 
and then fumbled. Morse, the freshman quarter- 
back, fell on it for a touchback. 



■■- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







•Brown attempted several goals from the field, but 
one was blocked and the others fell short. French 
played a good game for the sophomores, making 
several long end runs. For the Freshmen, Morse 
played the best game. This was the second of the 
series of contests between the two classes. As both 
have resulted in draws, the freshmen are still forbid- 
den to smoke on the campus, this privilege being 
given to them only after they have defeated the 
sophomore in some athletic contest. 

The line-up: — 
1910. 19H. 

Leonard, r. e. L •.. Lew. Davy 

Eddy. r. t. 1- *•• Smith. Whittaker 

Brant, r. g. '• g- Howard 

Turner, c. c - Robinson 

Partridge. 1 g, r - £•- Loker 

Schermerhorn, McGraw, Urban, 1. t. 
Prouty. 1. e. 
Thomas, q. b. 
Brown, r. h. b. 
French, 1. q. b. 
McCraw. Schermerhorn. f. b 

Score— 1910 0, 1911 0. 
Turner. Linesmen — Damon and Robb 
25 and 15 minutes. 



Cobb, that saved M. A. C. from defeat. Time 
and again Springfield would bring the ball by 
long forward passes within striking distance of the M. 
A. C. goal but just at the critical moment M. A. C. 
would secure the ball and Capt. Cobb would lift the 
ball away down the field, out of danger for the time 
being. The forward pass as executed by the Spring- 
field players was almost perfect and seldom failed to 
result in long gains. 

Both sides played hard, fast football and injuries 
were frequent on both sides. Blaney was injured in 
the first rush and was forced to retire, Tilton took his 
place and played a good game. Turner played a 
strong game at end and Capt. Cobb played his usual 
good game at quarterback. 

The line-up : — 



r. e.. Sharpe 
q. b., Morse 
r. h. b.. Tilton. Adams 
1. h. b., Daniels 
f. b., Coash 
Referee— Cobb. Umpire- 
Time of halves— 



M. A. C, 5; Springfield Training School, 0. 

In a close and interesting contest Massachusetts 
defeated S. T. S. at Springfield, November 16. The 
Training School has the best team it has had for 
many years and was very confident of winning the last 
game of a hitherto successful season. Before the 
game supporters of the Springfield team voiced their 
confidence in snatches of song such as "Goodbye 
Aggie, don't forget the way back home." "There 
will be sorrow in Amherst town tonight" and various 
other parodies. Their confidence was soon shaken 
however for the Massachusetts team rushed the 
Springfield players off their feet at the start and scored 
a touchdown in ten minutes of play. Tilton secured 
the ball on an attempted forward pass by Springfield 
on the Springfield 20-yard line. It was advanced to 
the 10-yard line by a forward pass on a kick formation, 
Cook to Turner. From here it was carried over in 
three rushes, Philbrick making the touchdown. 
Throughout the half M. A. C. held a decided advant- 
age. In the second half Springfield came back strong 
and it was only the magnificent punting of Captain 



M. A. C. 

Turner. 1. e. 
Farley. 1. t. 
Anderson, 1. g. 
Paige, c. 
Crosby, r. g. 
Sexton, r. t. 
Leonard, r. e. 
Cobb. q. b. 
Tilton. 1. h. b. 
Blaney. 1, h. b. 
Daniels, r. h. b. 
Roberts, r. h. b. 
Willis, f. b. 
Philbrick. f. b. 

Score— M. A. C. 5. Touchdown 
A. R. Dorman. Umpire— Dr. J. W 
Linesmen — F. Foster, French and 
minute and 30 minute periods. 



S. T. S. 

r e., Bailey 

r. t., Hemmen 

r. g., Cook 

c. Briggs 

I. g., McGuire 

1. t. ( Howard 

1. e., Crispen 

q. b\ McCullock 

r. h. b., Jones 

r. h. b.. Grey 

1. h. b., Colton 

f. b.. Rice 
f. b.. Jones 

-Philbrick. Referee — 

Collins. Prof. J. Tower. 

Emerson. Time — 25 



College Notts- 



prof. Waugh's house is being remodeled 

Prof. F. A. Waugh was the speaker at the Y. M. 
C. A. meeting, Nov. 14. 

The chapel exercises, Nov. 11, were conducted 
by Father Gavin, Amherst. 

The Y. M. C. A. services, Nov, 21, were con- 
ducted by Prof. James A. Foord. 

The chapel exercises, Nov. 22, were conducted by 
Rev. Wilbert F. Anderson, Amherst. 



Rev. John Wriston of West Springfield addressed 
the Vesper services, Sunday, Nov. 17. 

There Is an unusually fine showing of chrysanthe- 
mums at the plant house just at present. 

The speaker at the Sunday Vesper services, Nov. 
24, was Prof. H. S. Cowell of Cushing Academy. 

The faculty has been generous in granting the stu- 
dents a Thanksgiving recess from noon, Wednesday, 
Nov. 27, to 8 o'clock the following Monday morn- 
ing. 

Ex-Governor George H. Utter of Westerly, R. I., 
addressed the Assembly, Nov. 20, in an interesting 
talk upon business, political, moral and social ques- 
tions. 

The Assembly, Nov. 13, was addressed by Prof. 
George Crook of Amherst College. Prof. Crook 
proved to be an excellent speaker, his subject being 
"Socialism." 

Part of the small orchard back of the Horticultural 
Department barn has been taken out on account of 
San Jose' scale, and also because many of the trees 
were of no value. 

The space occupied by the class-bed in front of 
South College has been planted with early flowering 
bulbs, which will fill the space until the 1908 class-bed 
is planned, and the time comes to put it in. 

Dr. Rivera, a prominent entomologist from Chili, 
visited college Friday, Nov, 22. He is a delegate 
from the Chilian government to study entomological 
methods in this country. He is also making a special 
study of our agricultural colleges. 

The Senate has made a ruling that hereafter the 
Sophomore- Freshman football game shall not be 
played until the end of the football season, and has 
rescinded the old rule which barred M men from this 
game. This should make the annual game a more 
close and exciting contest, and will show better the 
relative strength of the classes. 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

The Drill Hall presented a very festive appearance 
on the afternoon and evening of November 23, the 
occasion of the second Informal Dance of the year. 
The decorations were practically the same as for the 
Reception the evening before. The stand for the 



orchestra was situated in the center of the floor, the 
platform being banked with hemlock, box-wood, 
chrysanthemums and palms. The constellation at 
the south end of the hall revealed again the season's 
triumphs in football. The bank of palms, foliage 
plants and chrysanthemums at the opposite end of the 
hall was a distinct feature, while displays of the same 
plants with boughs of hemlock relieved the corners 
and doorways. The walls were hung with three large 
flags, as well as countless Massachusetts banners and 
pennants. The balcony rail and walls were relieved 
with hemlock boughs interspersed with countless 
single blossoms of chrysanthemums, making a 
brilliant and very pretty effect. The patronesses' 
corner was banked off with palms and plants at the 
southeast corner of the hall. The programme for the 
evening called for eighteen numbers, in addition to 
which a few extra numbers were played. The music 
was furnished by Saint Marie's Orchestra of 
Holyoke. Mrs. Rowe catered at Draper Hall during 
intermission. The patronesses for the evening were 
Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Hasbrouck and Mrs. Howard of 
Amherst, and Miss Joslin of Smith. Miss Jackson 
chaperoned the party from Mt. Holyoke. The fol- 
lowing attended the dance; 

Mr. Henri Haskins, P. H. Smith, C. Bates 
K. E. Gillett, J. A. Hyslop, G. R. Cobb, W. 
J. Coleman, L. D. Larsen, W. S. Regan, R. D, 
Whitmarsh, A. J. Farley, P. M. Eastman, 
R. H. Jackson, R. E. Cutting,| F. E. Thurston, 
A. L. Whiting, H. C. Chase, W. F. Sawyer, 
J. R. Parker, R. H. Verbeck, E. D. Phil- 
brick, L. W. Chapman, L. S. Corbett, R. C. 
Potter, John Noyes, M. W. Thompson, R. D. Lull, 
A. W. Hubbard, E. J. Burke, L. S. Dickinson, W. 
R. Clarke, J. P. Blaney, R. E. Annis, R. H. Allen, 
H. A. Brooks, W. W. S. Titus, R. A. Waldron, W. 
F. Hennessy, C. A. Lodge, G. B. Nickerson. 



RECEPTION. 

The college and all those connected with it turned 
out en masse last Friday night to participate in a 
reception tendered by the good ladies of the faculty 
to the student body in honor of the football team. 
The Drill Hall was transformed by the tasty efforts of 
the ladies into a luxurious reception hall. In the 
center stood the platform for the music, the borders 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 















of the stage being prettily set with hemlock sprays, 
box- wood plants and potted chrysanthemums. At 
the south end of the hall the eye was met with a 
brilliant Illumination of red and white lights enclosing 
a record of the results of the season's football games. 
At the north end of the hall were set four serving 
tables spread with white linen and set with silver can- 
dlesticks bearing lighted tapers. The table decora- 
tions Included large vases of chrysanthemums and 
dainty designs wrought upon the cloth in hemlock 
sprays and smilax. At the extreme end of this part 
of the hall was a bank of palms, chrysanthemums 
and various foliage plants. The corners and nooks 
and doorways of the hall were also relieved by banks 
of foliage, palms and boxwood, with generous inter- 
mingling of potted and cut chrysanthemums. The 
balcony rail and walls were offset with hemlock 
boughs In which nestled countless single chrysanthe- 
mums. The walls on the north and east were draped 
with huge American flags, while all around the hall 
were hung Innumerable college banners. 

The college orchestra opened festivities with selec- 
tions while the many students present were ushered 
around to the different receiving groups which were 
made up as follows : Mrs. Butterfield, Mrs. Smith 
and Mrs. White; Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Gordon, Mrs. 
Foord; Mrs. Femald, Mrs. Hart and Miss Hall; 
Mrs. Howard, Mrs. Armagnac, Mrs. Walker; Miss 
Knowles, Mrs. Gracey and Mrs. Kenney ; Mrs. 
Sears, Mrs. Waugh and Mrs. Butterfield. 

At 8-30 the members of the football team were 
ushered In to the strains of a march, and Introduced 
around to the various receiving groups. Dean George 
F. Mills then took the platform and offered the team 
the congratulations of the faculty and especially the 
ladles of the faculty. He congratulated the team on 
the excellent physical condition with which it closed 
the season, and closed his remarks with an apprecia- 
tion of the place of football in a college education 
and training. Captain George R. Cobb was then 
called upon, and told In a few words of the apprecia- 
tion of the members of the team of the courtesy of 
the members of the faculty in regard to excuses from 
and favorable arrangement of exercises, and their 
special gratification at this effort of the ladies of the 
faculty In honor of the team. Ice cream and cake 
were then served, Bias brothers cutting the cream, 



and Mrs. White, Mrs. Osmun, Mrs. Goessmann, 
Mrs. Kenney, Mrs. Llndsey, Mrs. Femald, Mrs. 
Ostrander and Mrs. Sears serving. After the plates 
were cleared away the orchestra struck up a Virginia 
reel, in which many couples participated. The fes- 
tivities of the evening were drawn to a close with a 
few two-steps and waltzes. The committee in charge 
of the various features of the program consisted of 
Mrs. Hasbrouck, Mr. Stone, Mrs. Paige, Mrs. Waugh 
and Mrs. Butterfield. From every point of view the 
reception was a marked success, the efforts of the 
ladies being fully appreciated by the students. 

The following ladies of the faculty were present : 
Mrs. Butterfield, Mrs. Stone, Mrs. Hasbrouck, Mrs. 
Paige, Mrs. Brooks, Mrs. Wellington, Mrs. Neal, 
Mrs. Ostrander, Mrs. Waugh, Mrs. Howard, Mrs. 
Gordon, Mrs. Holcomb, Mrs. Martin, Mrs. Goess- 
mann and Misses Mary and Agnes Goessmann, Mrs. 
Foord, Mrs. Fernald, Mrs. White, Mrs. Sears, Mrs. 
Osmun, Mrs. Hart, Mrs. Gracey, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. 
Walker, Mrs. Fulton, Miss Knowles, Miss Hall, Miss 
Ball, Miss Dacey, and Miss Puffer. The members 
of the faculty were also present, making the gathering 
indeed a college affair. 



THE STORY OF A FLAG STAFF. 

Anyone entering the Trophy Room in North Col- 
lege finds at his left in the corner the old chapel bell 
rescued from the cupola of what is now the chemical 
laboratory. The bell tongue-tied by a cross-beam is 
raised some three feet from the floor by a simple and 
substantial frame work of wood. Though this frame 
is well finished even a cursory examination discloses 
square, rusty holes at intervals and a patch or two. 
Spike holes he says to himself, and looks farther. 
Surmounting the whole structure is a gilded ball upon 
a short pole-end with a pulley therein. And the 
stranger wonders if It was not at some former time a 
flag-staff, this relic of other days. 

It was during the strenuous administration of Presi- 
dent Clark that a giant of the forest standing not far 
from the now abandoned rifle range was felled by 
wood cutters and shorn of its branches, Nearly a 
1 00 feet it had reared its head toward the clouds. 
Seventy feet of this tree were drawn to the plant house 
hill with the expectation that there the college would 



center. But before it had been planted or even 
shaped It was decided to erect it on the spot where 
until recently it stood. Mr. Joe Gilbert and Mr. 
Canavan's son were employed to hew It into a flag- 
staff. 

About fifteen years ago the pole was guyed with 
ropes and cut through near the ground. It had 
decayed considerably where air and moisture both 
could work upon it, but below ground it was found to 
be intact. Nevertheless the 10 foot butt and cross 
at the bottom were removed. A new cross was pro- 
vided and the pole was lowered. Those who wit- 
nessed the operation speak of it as quite an engineer- 
ing feat and doubtless it was. At this time four feet 
were taken off the top, a new slot made for the pulley, 
and the ball replaced. Five years later when the 
water- works were being installed the pole was braced, 
a space round about its base was excavated and filled 
with cement. But decay had commenced, the 
elements continued to assail the staff until Oct. 5, 
1905, when during a severe gale "with colors flying 
she went down." The impact broke the staff into 
three or four lengths. These were placed behind the 
college barn where they lay until a happy thought of 
Mr. Canavan's, amended by Mr. Wallace and others, 
made possible the perpetual preservation of the old 
giant of the forest in the office which it now serves. 

The bare mention of the staff or its presence in the 
trophy room must to many an alumnus recall from 
those good old days the memory of wild escapades of 
a few whose reckless daring flew other and less wel- 
come banners to the wind than Old Glory. We 
undergraduates who love to hear the ta les of plunder 
and adventure from the lips of some old "grad," yet 
would not entertain the idea of doing such rash t hings 
ourselves, are told that the uniform of a certain com- 
mandant who was seemingly not any too popular 
among the cadets for his comfort was secured from 
his office at the drill hall one night, stuffed with hay 
and raised to the top of the flag-staff. The effigy's 
counterpart marching up the road next morning des- 
cried the dark, swaying object at the staff head from 
afar and marveled much, but not until his own precious 
uniform was recognized did his breast burn with caloric 
fury. And It Is said that he would not wear the 
recovered clothes, though unharmed, but levied a tax 



upon the student body of 50 or 75 dollars to purchase 
a new rig. It is only four or five years since one, 
whom members of '08 and '09 may recall, climbed 
to the top of the pole and nailed a white cloth thereto. 
We have been told that Investigation did not follow 
for it was allowed that anyone with the nerve to per- 
form the hazardous act ought not to be disciplined. 

But to whatever unwortny use the old flag staff was 
put in the past it did its duty well through gale and 
calm in shaking from Its lofty peak the rippling 
folds of the "Stars and Stripes," and whatever of 
love for country and love for commonwealth and zeal 
for "Massachusetts" the dear old flag aroused In 
manly hearts that daily throbbed beneath its shadow 
was due in no small degree to the straight and sturdy 
staff. Let us try to realize the significance of the 
staff in our trophy room In a different form but for a 
similar purpose — that of sustaining in a calmer atmo- 
sphere a more clamorous messenger of joy and exulta- 
tion than was its wont in the outer air. 

We scarce see the flag nowadays. Sometimes it 
Is dragged forth to decorate wall or platform upon 
special occasions but to watch its folds swell upon 
the morning breeze as it mounts towards the blue 
depths whence it caught its own blue field, to have 
its bright colors flash upon the eye at every turn and 
at sunset to hear it flap now and again as the wind 
gasps and dies away at last, is no more. If only 
there were another forest giant ready to yield to the 
woodman's axe to be shorn of Its branches, to be 
hewn into shape, to have an upper staff with gilded 
ball and a pulley and rope. If only we might ere 
long have such a staff planted upon our campus with 
Old Glory at its head, would not we lead more unsel- 
fish lives and would not we feel that after all it is not 
the class, the college or the state, but the nation, for 
which we are living, one grand, free republic that 
needs the best In every one of us to further the Inter- 
ests of humanity? 



METTAWAMPE CLUB. 

During a recent trip to Mt. Toby by a trio of men 
prominent among our faculty, one of the three made 
the suggestion that perhaps there were many men 
connected with M. A. C. who, being interested in 
Nature, would favor the formation of a club which 






IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



might have for its object general nature study and 
recreation of all sorts. The suggestion on being put 
before our men was received with avidity, and hence 
the organization known as the Mettawampe Club has 
been called into existence. 

Mettawampe is another name for Mt. Toby and is 
of Indian origin. This name seemed especially 
appropriate for two reasons, firstly that the idea of 
such a club was called into existence on this moun- 
tain, and secondly because Mettawampe is the near- 
est mountain to M. A. C. and it is assumed that all 
members of the club are Interested in mountains in 
one way or another. 

A constitution has been adopted and officers 
elected. There are at present more than one hun- 
dred members, being represented by the faculty, 
graduate students and undergraduates. 

The constitution of the club is as follows : 

CONSTITUTION. 



Art. 1. Name. 

The name of the club shall be "Mettawampe Club, " 
in recognition — first, of the original owner of Mount 
Toby the Indian chieftain, Mettawampe, according 
to the earliest records; secondly, because this mag- 
nificent pile of grandeur, being situated nearer our 
college than any other mountain, may be said, in a 
poetic sence, to belong to the college j thirdly because 
the inception of the club during a tramp of our men 
on the glorious afternoon of October 19, 1907, was 
on this mountain. 

Art. II. Object. 

The object of the club shall include all kinds of 
healthful recreation, as these may be determined by 
vote of its members. 

Art. III. Members. 
The members of the club shall be any persons 
connected with Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
who have signed the constitution. 

Art. IV. Officers. 

The officers shall consist of a president, a secretary- 
treasurer, an auditor, an executive committee of 
seven, and four trek-masters. 

These shall be elected in the usual manner. 



Art. V. Duties of Officers. 

The president shall be a graduate,* shall preside at 
all meetings and shall be ex-officio member of all 
committees. 

The secretary-treasurer shall receive and disburse 
all funds of the club and report on these transactions 
on stated occasions, and shall carry on the cor- 
respondence of the club. It shall be understood that 
the secretary treasurer is to receive assistance from 
the auditor and from the four under-graduate members 
of the executive committee to the extent of his 
requests. 

The auditor shall audit the books and accounts of 
the secretary- treasurer, and assist him in collections 
and disbursements. 

The executive committee shall consist of three 
graduates and a member of each of the four under- 
graduate classes. The committee shall hold meetings 
at which may be discussed all matters concerning the 
activities of the club, and shall make plans for the 
same, subject to the approval of the entire member- 
ship of the club. The committee shall fill all 
vacancies in the board of officers until an election 
can be held by the club. The chairman of the com- 
mittee shall be a graduate member. The four 
undergraduate members shall assist the secretary- 
treasurer as above indicated. 

The four trek-masters shall make specific plans for 
tramps, outings and other entertainments of the club, 
and shall provide competent guides on all such 
occasions. 

Art. VI. 

This constitution may be changed by a two-thirds 
vote of the entire membership. 

These officers were elected to serve until their 
successors shall be officially named: 

President, H. D. Haskins ; Sec'y-Treasurer, R. 
H. Verbeck; Auditor, L. D. Larsen; Executive 
Committee, K. L. Butterfield, W. R. Hart, J. A. 
Foord, A. L. Whiting, H. L. White, W. N. 
Wallace, C. A. Lodge; Trek-Masters, J. B. Paige, 
E. A. White, C. E. Gordon, A. V. Osmun. 



•A graduate is any person not an undergraduate. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 



TRUSTEES' MEETING. 

The Trustees' Committee on Finance held an im- 
portant meeting at the college Nov. 19. They 
adopted a plan which goes into effect Dec. 1 , cen- 
tralizing the finances and business of the college more 
completely in the Treasurer's office. Orders for sup- 
plies are to be made on requisitions from the heads 
of departments, and countersigned by the Treasurer. 
A voucher check will be used for the payment of bills, 
All receipts of money will hereafter be turned directly 
into the Treasurer's office, and all bills will be paid 
by the Treasurer. The Treasurer will make a 
monthly statement to the Trustees showing the finan- 
cial status of the institution. 

A committee was appointed to consider the feasi- 
bility of purchase by the Treasurer of certain supplies 
for the whole institution, such as stationery, janitor 
supplies, the hauling of freight, etc. 

The committee also formulated a plan for an an- 
nual apportionment of the funds of the institution to 
the various departments. This apportionment is to 
be based on estimates furnished by the departments, 
and all orders for goods, unless specially authorized, 
must be made from the apportionment allotted. 

It is thought that this systematizing of the ac- 
counts and finances will eventually result in a consid- 
erable saving of money, and will permit the depart- 
ments much greater opportunity than they have had 
to secure needed funds, while at the same time re- 
ducing the probability of deficit in the college ac- 
counts at the end of the year. 



Dfp&rtmf rvf ^lot?s. 

POMOLOGY. 
The Department of Pomology has just received 
100 very fine wax models of apples. These are of 
standard varieties, and will be especially valuable to 
the classes in systematic pomology in the identification 
of varieties, in the preparation of classifications, etc. 
These wax models are made by Mrs. Stanley Potter, 
of Canada, who is one of the best, if not the very best 
artist in this line in America. 

LANDSCAPE. 
The Department of Landscape Gardening has re- 



ceived a new Gurley plane table of a design new to 
the department. It is a larger and heavier Instru- 
ment man any heretofore in use at M. A. C, and 
has a number of additional accessories, It is there- 
fore capable of doing work of a considerably higher 
grade. 

DRAWING. 
The Department of Drawing has added several 
new books. The course is developing in excellent 
style. The students have been getting much more 
practical work in this subject than in any previous 
year. Exercises have been held in drawing leaves, 
twigs and fruits; also, in drawing trees In the field, 
and in drawing insects and small animals. The 
drafting-room in landscape gardening is also further 
advanced than usual, owing to the improved facilities. 

FARM. 

Several promising grade cows have recently been 
added to the farm herd, and, according to Superin- 
tendent Forristall, are doing very well. They are 
now milking twenty-five cows. The milk product for 
last month from this herd brought about four hundred 
dollars. Besides the grade cows, there are at pres- 
ent in the college herd nine registered Ayrshires, six 
registered Holsteins, two registered Jerseys, and one 
registered Guernsey. The Ayrshire bull, cows and 
calves exhibited at the New England Fair at Wor- 
cester all took first prizes in their respective classes. 
One of the Jerseys, Lass III, of the Hood farm, re- 
cently made seventeen pounds of butter in a seven 
day test. 

The new milk-rooms are now almost In working 
order. The milk-house is directly connected with the 
cow-barn. The milk, after milking, is taken directly 
to the first milk-room, where It is taken up to a plat- 
form about six feet high. From the platform the 
milk is poured through a gauze filter, from whence It 
it runs by gravity into the next room over a large 
cooler, and thence into a bottling tank, from which it 
is bottled automatically, eight quart bottles or ten 
pint ones being filled at a time. Instead of being 
bottled, the milk may run from the filter to a milk- 
separator, from which the separated cream flows 
over a cooler and into an automatic cream bottler. 
There is also in this room a large cream vat, where 
the cream is refined preparatory to churning. In the 



13 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






next room, the wash-room, Is a large steam sterilizer, 
where all the milk and cream bottles are thoroughly 
treated before use. There are also many minor con- 
veniences in this room for the washing of cans and 
other utensils. All the walls, floors and ceilings of 
the milk-rooms are cemented, and all metal work is 
galvanized or tinned, so that the rooms can be filled 
with live steam and thorough cleanliness insured. 



1 think a closer union would be worth looking into, 
Yours Very Truly, 

F. H. Fowler, '87. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

The editor publishes below extracts from two letters 
recently received relative to the editorial which ap- 
peared in the last issue of the Signal. It may be 
added here that it has been suggested from several 
sources within the college that the Signal would serve 
a greater usefulness as a weekly publication. This is 
an old question which has been talked over at Signal 
board meetings for the past three years, but which 
has always been passed upon as impossible physically 
for the simple reason of lack of time and no credit. 
The present issue has cost the editor alone 20 hours, 
or two good working days out of 14. The other mem- 
bers of the board have sacrificed correspondingly. Is 
it physically possible to do this every week ? The 
communications : 

Personally, I think the editors of the College paper 
should receive as much consideration at the hands of 
the Faculty as those who play on the athletic teams, 
for it does take " inspiration and nerve to do a thing 
In the face of mere impassive acquiescence." I do 
not know the "ins and outs " of the credit system in 
the English Department, but if other colleges give 
credit for good work on the college paper, I see no 
reason why our College should not do so. 
Yours Very Truly, 

W. H. Bowker, 71. 

I have just read your editorial In the last issue of 
" The College Signal," and you have my sympathy 
and support. I agree with you fully in the views you 
express and among other things I wish the College (at 
least the English Department) would recognize the 
work of the Signal Board and give its editors proper 
credit for English work performed. Perhaps I would 
not go so far as to make the publication of the col- 
lege paper an adjunct to the English Department, but 



Alu 



mm. 



We cite with pleasure, as a precedent worthy of 
copying, the admirable scheme which the members 
of the class of 1905 have adopted as a means of 
keeping in touch with each other and of fostering the 
class spirit of college days, which tends to die out If 
not awaKened occasionally. An annual letter, in the 
form of a set of carbon copies of each man's letter, 
is sent to every member of the class each year, and 
a copy preserved by the class secretary. Thus after 
a number of years the secretary has, as it were, an 
autobiography of each member for the period between 
his graduation and the writing of his last letter. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College Club of 
New York will hold its twenty-second annual reunion 
and banquet at the St. Denis Hotel, Broadway and 
Eleventh street, Friday evening, December 6th, at 
seven o'clock. 

All former and present members of the Faculty 
and Board of Trustees, and graduates and forme- 
students who may attend, are thereby enrolled as 
members. 

The rapid growth of the College, its increase In 
teaching efficiency, the widely spreading notice of its 
work and the fine record of our foot-ball team are 
matters of congratulation ; our reunions have always 
been well attended by the older and oldest graduates ; 
the very recent sons of M. A. C. should wake up to 
the opportunity of meeting such, an advantage grad- 
uates of venerable institutions have not. 

The by-laws prohibit any solicitation of funds for 
any purpose at these meetings ; it is a time for the 
gathering of information from President Butterfield 
and others, and the renewal and development of fel- 
lowship ; but one formal notice will be sent out ; if 
you want a reminder, please so indicate ; dinner 
tickets, three dollars. 

Yours in M. A. C, ' 

Winfield Ayres, M. D. , '86, President, 
616 Madison Ave. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



13 



John A. Cutter, M. D., '82, Acting Secretary, 

251 West 73rd Street, N. Y. 
A. L. Fowler, '80, Treasurer. 
New Rochelle, N. Y. 



To the Editor of the College Signal : 

A recent editorial in the Signal relative to the 
duties of the Alumni toward the Signal ought to strike 
home to a large number. We expect and want 
Alumni News. How many of the Alumni send Items 
of interest to their college paper ? 

The undersigned is one of the guilty ones who tries 
to keep track of the doings of the Alumni but Instead 
of sending his items to the editors keeps them on file 
until they are out of date. 

For example, the following have come to his knowl- 
edge but he is not aware that they have been pub- 
lished. 

The following Alumni spent some of the summer 
at their homes in Amherst : W. C. Paige, '91, of 
New Albany, Indiana. Secretary of Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. Claude F. Walker,' 94, of New York City, High 
School of Commerce. 

Fred G. Averill, '94, of Boston, 131 State Street. 

James W. Kellogg, '00, of Harrisburg, Pa., 
Chemist at Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The following after graduation held positions as 
chemists at the college and station and visited the col- 
lege during some of the vacation: 

F. J. Smith, '90, of Elizabeth, N. J., Chemist, 
Bowker Insecticide Company. 

J. E. Halligan, '00, of Baton Rogue, La., Chem- 
ist at Experiment Station. 

George H. Mann, '76, of Sharon, Supt. of Cotton 
Duck Mills, trolleyed through Amherst July 5 and 
paid a hurried visit to his alma mater — the first in 
many years. 

President Wlnthrop E. Stone, '82, of Purdue 
University, Lafayette, Ind., received the honorary de- 
gree LL. D. from the Michigan Agricultural College 
at its fiftieth anniversary last May. 

These items would have doubtless been of Interest 
had they been sent in on time but I think that they ar* 
fair examples of what many of the Alumni might 
send did they realize that they would be welcome. 

If each Alumnus would take the pains to send a 



card or a note when he learned of changes and pro- 
motions and honors among the Alumni, the duties of 
the Alumni Editor would be made pleasanter and even 
more satisfactory to the rest of the Alumni. 

Sincerely, 
S. Francis Howard, '94. 
'71. — Lewis A. Nichols, with the Chicago Steel 
Tape company, has donated the engineering depart- 
ment a leveling rod, a tape and a picket. The depart- 
ment wishes through these columns to gratefully 
acknowledge the receipt of same. 

79.— Prof. H. E. Stockbridge, Ph.D., editor of the 
Southern Ruralist Atlanta, Ga., has during the past 
year organized and conducted the State Farmers' 
Institutes for Georgia under a special appropriation of 
the Legislature. 

'85. — Joel E. Goldthwait, spent a few hours about 
College recently and lectured in Northampton the 
same evening, before the Home Culture Club, on 
Tuberculosis of the Bones and Joints. Dr. Goldth- 
wait is recognized as a leading specialist in 
Boston on the deformities of children. He has made 
many valuable contributions to science, and devised 
various pieces of apparatus for correcting abnormal 
conditions both in children and adults. He has large 
offices in Boston, employs several assistants, and 
likewise conducts experiments at the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. Dr. Goldthwait is not only a skill- 
ful physician and Investigator, but a man of high 
ideals and fine character. He entered M. A. C. in 
the autumn of 1881, at the suggestion of Dr. Lindsey, 
who considers him as his boy. The College is justly 
proud of claiming him among its honored alumni. 
Dr. Goldthwait expressed himself as extremely grate- 
ful at the manifold improvements about College and 
especially pleased at the fine spirit manifested by the 
student body. He remembers the Inspirations which 
he received from his Instructors while a student, and 
stated he was a loyal M. A. C. man. 

'87. — Prof. E. R. Flint, Ph. D., Is professor of 
Chemistry and physician to the State University of 
Florida, which has recently been moved from Lake 
City to Gainesville, and has absorbed all the other 
state educational institutions except that conducted 
for women. Dr. Flint spent the summer vacation In 
the Canal Zone as Physician to the Canal Commission. 



;• 



M 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'87. — A neatly gotten up paper entitled "Early Agri- 
cultural Education in Massachusetts," bears the name 
of Frederick H. Fowler, B. Sc, M. A. C. '87, first 
clerk and librarian, Massachusetts State Board of 
Agriculture. The introductory paragraph states 
that " the purpose of this paper is to show that the 
need of education in agriculture was early present in 
the minds of citizens of Massachusetts, and to trace 
the expression of this need and the efforts put forth to 
meet it." The paper treats the subject fully in a his- 
torical way up to the time of the incorporation of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1863. 

'88. — The fourth bulletin of Montana Farmer's 
Institutes, together with an advertising leaflet, has been 
prepared and issued by F.S.Cooley,M.A.C.'88, Supt. 
of Farmer's Institutes of Montana. The bulletin out- 
lines the work of the Farmer's Institutes, giving district 
programs, and lists of speakers, among which Pro- 
fessor Cooley's name appears frequently. The state 
of Montana appropriates $7,500 annually for this 
branch of extension work. 

'92. — In Springfield Nov. 18, born, a daughter, Eliz- 
abeth, to Dr. Walter I. and Mabel (Carley) Boynton 
of 73 Dartmouth street. 

'93. — C. A. Smith, Southern California Patholog- 
ical Laboratory and Experiment Stations, Whittier, 
Cai. 

'94. — Fred L. Greene, principal high school, Red 
Bluff, Cal. 



•94. — H. Preston Smead, East Dummerston, 



Vt. 



'94. — Ralph E. Smith figures as the author of two 
bulletins from the California Experiment Station, 
one on the California Peach Blight, the other on the 
Brown Rot of the Lemon. T. F. Hunt, '05 is 
mentioned as assisting on the work on peach 
blight. 

Ex- '94. — John S. Goodell, who for the past nine 
years has been engaged as a civil engineer in field 
work for the Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe railroad, 
with headquarters at Cleburne, Tex., has been pro- 
moted to take charge of the office work of the com- 
pany In Galveston, Tex. 



'95. — H. D. Hemenway has been conducting 
weekly a series of Forestry and Nature Study Tramps 
in the vicinity of Northampton under the auspices of 
the Home Culture Club, Northampton. These take 
place on Saturdays and will continue until Dec. 14, 
at least. 

'95. — Clarence B. Lane, assistant chief of the 
Dairy Divsion, United States Department of Agricul- 
ture at Washington, recently visited the college. 

'96. — A. M. Kramer holds a position as draftsman 
with Lauer &. Harper, engineers and contractors, 
Baltimore, Md. 

'96.— Special Bulletin No. 39 of Michigan State 
Agricultural College Experiment Station entitled" Pol- 
linationof Forced Tomatoes," bears the names of S. 
W. Fletcher, M. A. C. '96, and A. I. Gregg as joint 
authors. "The object of these experiments were to 
determine the extent to which the irregularity and 
small size of some greenhouse tomatoes are due to 
imperfect pollination ; and also to ascertain whether 
there is any benefit to be derived from the cross- 
pollination of varieties as compared with self-pollina- 
tion." The bulletin contains 10 pages with seven 
illustrations. Professor Fletcher is professor of horti- 
culture, Michigan Agricultural College. 

'99. — w. E. Hines, Ph. D., has recently gone 
from Dallas, Tex., where he was employed by the 
United States Department of Agriculture in the study 
of the Cotton Boll Weevil, to Auburn, Ala. There 
he is professor of Entomology in the Alabama Poly- 
technic Institute which is the State Agricultural 
College of Alabama. 

'99. — Frederick D. Merrill is professor of Agricul- 
ture and a member of the Industrial Department of 
the Baptist Collegiate Industrial Institute at Mount 
Vernon, Ga. This Is one of the two secondary edu- 
cational institutions in Georgia not maintained by the 
state, which has a regularly organized agricultural 
course. 

'01. — R. I. Smith, lately State Entomologist of 
Georgia, resigned his position the first of October to 
accept the professorship of entomology at the North 
Carolina Agricultural and Mechanical College at 
Raleigh. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



*5 



'01— P. C. Brooks, 418 Englewood Avenue, Chi- 
cago, 111. (Englewood Station.) 

Ex-'03. — Clifford A. Tinker, architect and engi- 
neer, mill and concrete engineering, surveyor, 21 
Elm street, Springfield. 

'06.— Married Sept. 24, 1907, at South Man- 
chester, Conn., Harold Burton Filer to Miss Eliza- 
beth Mary Flood. 

Ex- '06. —William W. Colton was married Nov. 5, 
to Miss Marion Ward, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Ward of Maiden. Mr. and Mrs. Colton will 
make their home in Dalton where Mr. Colton holds a 
position as forester with Fred G. Crane. 

'07. — Wayland F. Chase has gone West to take up 
work with one of the largest nurseries in Minnesota, 
where he will have charge of the development of land- 
scape gardening. His address will be Lake City, 
Minn. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



YOU'LL carry away a good impression of our system of doing 
business, and of the unusual values we are offering, when you 
make your initial visit to our store. We are not satisfied to be 
merely "as good as other stores." Our establishment must be "IT" 
from every good view-point. It IS different from all others — to your 
decided advantage and approval. 



•Alvfay$ Welcome-bdy or i)ot 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come to mi for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Hall. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 



ALSO 



Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 

All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

tW rull Dress Suits to rent. «#-stu dents' Clothes bought. 



11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 



It's Your Next at the 



Meist Bouse BarM Shop 



Four First Class Barbers 



GOODS FOR MEN 




"For the 



Land's Sake" 



USI 



BOWKER'S 



FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 8 P. M 


Tuesdays ' t 


. 11 


6 « 


Wednesdays, ; 


r " 


8 " 


Thursdays, 7 


H 


6 " 


Fridays, \ 


1 " 


8 " 


Saturdays, ', 


. 11 


11 " 



C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STVLES. IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



Poeket Magnifiers for Botanists 

3 Lens 60c 
2 Lens 50c 

OLIVER TYPEWRITER. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



W£*»aikt: shop. 



RaDar's 3nn t 



K. A. THOMPSON, 

Hear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



I 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 




Caps and Gotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CLASS. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

XL J. RAHAR. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Av<> , Nkw Tors. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

<;r<>irs Strong. Vigorous, Healthy Plants That lie »i»t Disease 

int. OKOBOI K. 8TONK. Profeanorof Botany at the Mass. 
AKrwulturnl College, an«l Profenwor ol l'lmit DUcshea m the 
Hutch V xpeiimt nt Mat tun, Amherst, Mass., writes to our 
Agricultural Expert as follows: 

" I will say that 1 consider the formula which you 
pr« pki t .1 for Mr. Prescutt and applied by him on his 
tip. is was very effectual in controlling the asparagus 
rust. The application of your formula and other fea- 
tures which were carried out In the management of 
these beds convince me that it constituted the best 
de m on .t ration of the control of asparagus rust which 
has ever been made In this country." 

GENUINE PKItt'VlAN GUAVO formed the basts of the 
above mentioned formula. It was used on the aaparsgun beds 
of C, W. Pkkscott., Concord, Muss., the largest Individual 
grower of Asparagus in New England. We also offer 

WK ALSO OHFK.U 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from New York, Boston, 

Mass., and Charleston, 8. C. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant rood 

Problems," Is sent free of charge. 

THE COE- MORTIMER CO., 

Hole Importers for I'. H. of Genuine Peruvian Guano, and 
Manufacturers of High Grade Kertlllier*. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 




In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes.Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jersey s, etc. Our 
goods have character 
— our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

WRIGHT <& DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

ig WEST 30TH ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Camhr.'jc.e, Mass. 




/ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic lllock, near Depot, Open every day. 
Lunches. Confectionery. Clgara Noted for iU excellent 
bu , v 0yBter stew am , CUm Cu0 w«ler. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 A. H. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MARDFACTCKBK OF 

SODA WATERS, 

Pln.appl.. U-~ •%*^*^™*&Z~* " - OIW 



RITM 8TRBBT, 



NOHTHAMFTOH, Mill. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DBD6 STORE. 



POWERS, 
THE TAILOR, 

Has received the latest fabrics for the ■prtaf and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladles 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

jgyMllitary Work a Specialty— & 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



OUR ICE GHEflJII SODA 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Dale. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

M.A.C.Air't. H.M.JBNKI»ON,'0« 

Qet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
«• «• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

i^cSATISFAOTION OUARANTBBD.tS' 

JT. A. UTLXT, Manmger. 

OFFICB : 

East pleasant Street. 



Pictures from all 'round College. 

191 1 Class Picture, 

Mettavvampe Snapshots, 

Photos and Post Cards of the Football Team 

Necco Sweets 



COIvLEGE STORE* 

Never Out of Oriter. 
The Nkw Home is the houwewlfe'8 constant friend : always 
rea.lv fw wort Tan .1 never out of order. It is not a continual 
source of worry and expense for repairs, buy one and be 
happy. Dealers everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLKR'8 BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



DENTAL ROOMS, 



CUTLER'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. TJ. 5. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... AMHERST, MASS. 

OFFICB HODBS: 

8 TO 13 JIm JH-, 1-SO TO 6 P. M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 

TH URBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Are you in need of a 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

ooor> COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



Gonnecticui Valley Street Railway Go. 

AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cara will leave Amherst ami Northampton on the hour and 
half hour from 8.30 a. m. till 10.80 p.m. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.80 a.m. 

Main Officb, Uhkknfield, Mabs. 
John A . TaKgart, 8upt. 

North ami-ton (MM B, 102 MAIM ST. 
C W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. 

Telephone, Northampton, 128-12. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 A inhere t. 

Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 8, 1906. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. E. BENTLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



/' 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



LAST CALL 

FOR CHRYSANTHEMUMS 

You will want some to take home Thanksgiving. 

See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, ID. A. C. 

Telephone. 





High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



Arthur E. Dorr. L. H. Tourtklotte. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



Corner North and Union St*., Basement 3 Union St., 
BOSTON. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mas*. 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




THE largest collboe engrav- 
ing house in the world. 

Works: 17thStreet&LehighAve. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES, BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS. 



J. H.TROTT 
PLUIDBEB, STERN & 6H8 FITTER. 

UNO DEALER II STOVES HMD INKS. 



Shop 15 \-i North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36- u. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 

Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE JM CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINE OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



J J 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for #1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 



E8TAHI.ISHKD 1451. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-21 LThird Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IHPOBTEBS AH!) MANCPACTDKKBS UP 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms witli Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE. MAS8. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER * CO. 



rwmas, 



AAHa$f . Aa$$. 



n 




THE : <t 



Massachusetts 
agricultural 

Golleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 



(b) A Short Course in Bke Culture. 
continues two wee*B. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butteri-iild, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 6 




MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST, MASS.. DECEMBER 11. 1907 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MAlKIDObIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



FINISH 




OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 
GO TO 

Page's Sboe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 



Deuef s Drug Store. 



Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Block, - . AMHERST. 






5 I 

M £ 



s i 



■ 

E 

i 
<-» 



c 

2S 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. DECEMBER II. 1907 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni arc requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collbgi Signal. Amhirst, Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOAKD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Assistant Ed'tor. 

O. B. BR1CCS, 1909, Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. W. E. ADAMS, 1909, Alumni Notes. 

J. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletics. E. F. DAMON. 1910. 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908, College Notes. W. R. CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 



Terms. $1.00 par gear in sdeance. Single Copies), 10c. Postage oataide of United Statea and Canada, Soc. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Association. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 
Base- Ball Association, 



Prof, S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison, Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Managei. 
College Senate, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index. 
Y. M. C. A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President. 



J. R.Parker , Pres. 

R. D. Lul<. Manager. 

C. H. White. Pres. 

H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Pest Office at Amherst. 



Ed i"tb rials. 



The Signal has devoted some space in recent 
issues to suggestions relative to the advisability of 
some sort of a credit system for work done and cuts 
taken by students engaged In work upon the college 
paper. After waiting a reasonable length of time for 
some advancements on the part of the English 
Department toward an understanding one way or 
another of the matter, the editor took it upon himself 
to bring about an understanding, and was surprised to 
learn that the English Department has already passed 
rules in regard to credit for students engaged in edi- 
torial or reporting work on college or student publica- 
tions, and that these rules are actually printed in a 
bulletin issued by the department at the beginning of 
the college year. The rulings as they may effect the 
editors of the Signal are as follows: 

I. Substitutions and Equivalents. — It is sometimes 
possible to substitute equivalent exercises in place of 
required papers that are not prescribed as part of a 



regular course; substitution for class papers is not 
allowed. Written permission to substitute must 
always be obtained in advance. 

(f) Students engaged in editorial or reporting work 
oh any of the College or student publications may 
offer this work for credit in place of required papers. 
The work itself must be submitted, with a written 
statement from the editor-in-chief or the managing 
editor of the publication that it was contributed by the 
student claiming it. The amount of credit allowed 
wih depend upon the nature and quality of the work 
submitted. 

The English Department, then, has demonstrated 
some Interest in the work which the editors of the 
college publications are doing. It is only to be 
regretted that that interest has not been made mani- 
fest enough to the students most concerned so that 
they may be aware of its actual existence. As it 
affects the Signal board, we regard the movement 
as one which indicates cooperation on the part of the 
English Department with the board of editors for the 
production of a higher grade of work in the regular 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



) 



college publication. Suggestions which the editor 
has made in recent issues were therefore not in order, 
but have nevertheless served the purpose of bringing 
into actual working order rules which before merely 
existed on paper. Cooperation implies not merely 
acquiescence, but action. Delayed action is but a 
burr under the saddle. 

There is much gratification in the knowledge that 
students working upon the college publications may 
receive proper credit for services rendered. There 
is a certain amount of training, in thought, expres- 
sion, judgment and punctuality which members of the 
board derive from their work which can not be 
derived from a course in English, no matter how 
efficient that course may be. This thought in the 
past has often been the only consolation of an over- 
worked editor. But there is a double inspiration now 
for individual effort, for more and better work. 
There is an inspiration for men of recognized ability, 
but perhaps of less unselfish college enthusiasm, to 
compete for positions upon the Signal board, so that 
in the future we hope to choose our men, and not be 
obliged to take merely what we can get. The matter 
of excuse from cuts incurred while engaged in Signal 
work cannot be settled without reference to the fac- 
ulty as a body. It is hoped that the faculty will 
appreciate that cuts must frequently be taken by 
editors when there comes a call for copy, or to meet 
appointments, or read proof, and that excuses may be 
granted, relying upon the Integrity of the editors, and 
not necessarily requiring them to prove an alibi. 
May the prophesy of cooperation indeed be fulfilled, 
both sides making advances for the common interest, 
— a more representative college organ. 



Infallibility is the result of abnormal development. 
All things natural are imperfect. We believe that 
past history has shown that the students of M. A. C, 
either individually, or in representative organizations, 
or as a student body, have made many and serious 
mistakes. We believe that the faculty, or represen- 
tative college authorities, have made some mistakes. 
And the present is no better than the past. 

The student body believes as a unit today that col- 
lege authorities have seriously erred in the matter of 
curtailing rights and privileges which have existed 
unquestioned before in regard to the hour at which 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



breakfast may be obtained at the Dining Hall. The 
whole subject seems so trivial in all Its aspects that 
the wonder is that the college authorities deigned to 
give it a second thought. The mandate that "the 
College will not be responsible for the serving of 
meals in the morning after 7-30' ' — or words to that 
same effect — is, no matter how seriously one tries to 
take it, amusing. In itself the ruling means nothing, 
forbids nothing, accomplishes nothing. But in con- 
junction with two other rules, aimed not at the stu- 
dent body as a whole, but at those men who wait on 
table at the Dining Hall, the rule is significant, and 
"there's the rub." The first of these two other rules 
was issued privily to the waiters and others engaged 
at the Dining Hall, informing them that, precedent 
notwithstanding to the contrary, their presence would 
be expected and demanded, with the usual allowance 
of cuts, at chapel services. This rule the waiters 
conscientiously, or in self-defense, tried to observe, 
but were so detained by late comers at the Dining 
Hall that they were in turn prevented from prompt 
attendance at the chapel services. And the slight 
disturbance caused by late-comers at chapel was 
unquestionably annoying to all concerned. Naturally, 
the patience of those conducting chapel exercises 
eventually became exhausted, and so another picket 
was added to the hedge by ruling that everybody 
should be in his seat at chapel services upon the 
cessation of the ringing of the chapel bell, and to 
insure the feasibility of student Dining Hall help 
observing this rule the hedge was completed with the 
addition of the rather ambiguous rule regarding the 
responsibility of the college for the serving of break- 
fast. What has been the effect ? The 200 men 
boarding at the Dining Hall, realizing the diffi- 
cult position which the twenty-odd waiters are placed 
in under the requirements, have endeavored to so 
change their formerly leisurely habits that their friends 
may comply with the superior mandate. The college 
authorities have accomplished their purpose, — at the 
expense of the good will of the student body. It is 
entirely within their province to do this: we place 
ourselves under their supervision and authority when 
we voluntarily enter the college and enroll ourselves 
as students. 

It is the sincere wish of both faculty and students 
that harmony shall prevail in the college life. And to 



secure harmony there must be a mutual understand- 
ing between faculty and students. A mutual under- 
standing Implies concessions on both sides, with an 
effort to arrive at the best good for the greatest num- 
ber. You cannot have harmony where one side dic- 
tates arbitrarily and the other side Is forced to com- 
ply. So the student body feels that it has a right to 
consideration in a matter which affects three-quarters 
of their number and which has no bearing whatever 
upon the happiness and welfare of any member of 
the faculty. It is hard to regard the matter from an 
unbiased point of view and answer the question "Why 
all this rumpus, anyway?" There is but one answer. 
The college authorities wished to make it possible for 
those twenty-odd men to attend chapel, beginning the 
day aright the same as the rest of us do. They had 
this privilege before, but experience proved that they 
could not or did not avail themselves of it. The 
supposition was that they were no more exempt from 
attendance at religious services than the rest of us — 
the same old question of religious intoleration which 
has caused strife and conflict, and retarded civiliza- 
tion and progress down through the ages. Oh the 
world is still young ! And that these twenty-odd may 
attend chapel, the remaining majority of students are 
required to curtail their breakfast hour by one half. 
It really seems like a little thing to ask of students 
that they arrive at breakfast but 10 or 15 minutes 
earlier. But it does mean much. It means that a 
tired student who has worked late into the night 
endeavoring to wrest mathematics from a dry text- 
book, or Signal copy from a vacuum, or in the sup- 
port of the basketball team, who inadvertently over- 
sleeps a few minutes, must go without his breakfast. 
But perhaps we should not place an occasional meal 
before our devout religious convictions. All creeds 
place godliness first, cleanliness second and give fair 
warning that intemperate eating leadeth to naught 
but misery. But the main reason that students 
object to the curtailment of the breakfast hour Is that 
it necessitates "hanging around" for 15 or 20 min- 
utes, waiting for chapel services. Those 15 or 20 
minutes are wasted,— if you room in the dormitories 
you can't study with half a dozen outsiders, also wait- 
ing for chapel, perched upon your corner-seat, the 
radiator, and in every available chair, all discussing 
the latest news from headquarters. You can't read 



the newspapers, for they haven't come up, and any- 
way there wouldn't be enough to go around. Wasted 
moments like those are the worst breeders of dis- 
eased thought and attitude. The old system, appar- 
ently good enough In Its day, allowed plenty of lee- 
way in the obtaining of breakfast, which could be 
eaten leisurely In time to stroll over to chapel and 
attend the chapel services. There was absolutely no 
rub In the system whatever. The waiters were 
excused from attendance at chapel, and thus given 
ample time to finish their work before the first reci- 
tation. All was smooth, there was but little grumb- 
ling, and chapel services were participated In with a 
spirit of goodwill and reverence. It is lamentable, 
and yet indicative of the sentiment of today, what a 
change the ruling in regard to those twenty-odd men 
has produced. The compulsion of the whole business 
is felt now, and the attitude is one of resentment, Ill- 
humor and anything but reverence for the services. 
Such is the construction of this human mind of ours ! 
You've got to make allowances. 

There Is one phase of the student view of the 
whole matter which has been touched 
upon and which may be given a little further 
consideration here. That is in regard to religious 
tolerance. Any thoughtful person who keeps In 
touch with the world's great movements must be 
aware that there is a strong and vital reaction today 
in the youth of the land against the dogma of estab- 
lished creeds. It is an era of free thought, of sepa- 
ration of the supernatural and unnatural from the 
real and natural. It is a striving toward truth and 
knowledge as against hypothesis and belief. Such a 
disposition on the part of young people naturally resents 
compulsion in matters pertaining to religion, with Its 
still uncertain proportions of dogma and morality. 
So, bringing the matter home to our college, there is 
a considerable feeling among the students that the 
right of the college authorities to enforce attendance 
upon chapel exercises, non-sectarian though they 
pretend to be, might well be questioned in view of the 
fact that the college is a state institution. We don't 
have to quote the laws of Massachusetts to prove that 
religious compulsion is not one of the State's assets. 
Neither does it weaken the argument to point out that, 
placing ourselves voluntarily as we do under the super- 
vision of the college authorities, we must comply 



; 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



with whatever rules they may see fit to make. It 
isn't the technicalities of the law we wish to circum- 
vent. Let it be understood right here that we are not 
agitating the abolishment of compulsory chapel at M. 
A. C. Only, in view of this "spirit of the times," it 
seems decidedly unwise to stir up the accustomed 
order of things that 20 odd men may be compelled to 
attend chapel services regardless of their inclinations. 
After all, the wisdom of the past in the matter seems 
the best wisdom of the present. David Starr Jordan, 
one of the greatest college presidents of today, and 
withal a keen and analytical thinker, says in regard 
to this matter of compulsory religion : 

"The college cannot make a student moral or 
religious through enforced attendance at church or 
chapel. It cannot arouse the spiritual element in his 
nature by any system of demerit marks. But let him 
find somewhere the work of his life. Let the thoughts 
of the student be free as the air. Give him a mes- 
sage to speak to other men, and when he leaves your 
care you need fear for him not the world nor the flesh 
nor the devil! 

If your Christianity or your creed seem to the stu- 
dent to need a bias in its favor, if it seem to him 
unable to hold its own in a free investigation, he will 
despise it, and if he be honest he will turn from it." 



/Uhletlc No**$. 



STOCK- 



Dec. 



Jan. 



3. 

17. 

7. 
21. 



Feb. 4. 



SCHEDULE OF SPEAKERS FOR 
BRIDGE CLUB, 1907-1908. 

S. H. Reed, West Brookfield. 

Warren H. Manning, 1101-4 Tremont 

Building, Boston. 
Frank Wheeler, Concord. 

A. D. Taylor, Cornell university, Ithaca, 
N. Y. 

B. M. Watson, Bussey Institute, 
Jamaica Plain. 

J. H. Hale, South Glastonbury, Conn. 
G. C. Creelman, president Ontario Agri- 
cultural College. Guelph, Ontario, Can. 
E. N. Foote, Northampton. 
A. G. Gulley, Storrs, Conn. 
T. L. Kinney, South Hero, Vt. 
Prof. W. D. Hurd, Orono, Me, 
Dr. H. J. Wheeler, Kingston, R 
George A. Drew, Greenwich, Conn 
G. C. Sevey, Springfield. 



18. 


March3. 


17. 


April 7. 


21. 


May 5. 


19. 


June 2. 


16. 



1. 



BASKETBALL. 

The basketball season formally opened Dec. 2nd 
when Capt. Gillett Issued his call for candidates. 
About twenty men responded and the material gives 
promise of developing into a fast team. With Cobb, 
Gillett and Burke as a nucleus it looks as if we should 
have the fastest team in the history of the college. 
Regan, '08, is playing a fine game this season, block- 
ing better than any other man on the team. Gillett 
and Cobb are playing in their usual good form. Other 
candidates that are showing particular aptitude to the 
game are Farley, Whitmrsah, Bates, Willis, Warner, 
Tilton, Daniels, Becker and Barrows. 

The manager has been particularly fortunate in 
securing J. F. Doran of Holyoke as coach. Mr. 
Doran has had years of experience and ranks among 
the best players of New England. This year Mr. 
Doran is playing with the strong Brattleboro, Vt. pro- 
fessional team. 

Manager Jennison has arranged a fine schedule this 
year, nine games being played on the home floor. 
An extended trip through Vermont, northern New 
York and Canada is being arranged for the Christmas 
holidays. Coming early In the season, It should be 
of inestimable benefit to the team, as nothing develops 
a team as much as playing on strange floors every 
night. Confidence and team play are instilled Into 
the men, and the lack of these points has characterized 
our teams in past years. The game Is being played 
this season according to Spaulding's Intercollegiate 
rules. Let us one and all put some enthusiasm into 
this sport and make basketball a feature for the winter. 
To make the season a success Manager Jennison 
must have the support of the entire student body. 
Don't be dead wood, show some college spirit by 
paying your tax. A man should blush with shame to 
attend a game before his tax is paid. 

SCHEDULE TO DATE. 

[) eC- 17 — University of Vermont at Burlington. 

Dec. 18 — University of St. Lawrence at Canton. 

Dec. 19 — Potsdam Normal at Potsdam. 

Jan. 8 — Holy Cross at Worcester. 

Jan. 1 1 — Rhode Island Agr'l College at Amherst. 

Jan. 17— Gardner A. A. at Gardner. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Jan. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Mar. 



18 — Cushing at Ashburnham. 

24 — Tufts at Amherst. 

21— Springfield Training School at Springfield. 

1 — Cushing at Amherst. 
12— Williams at Williamstown. 
22— 
29 — Worcester Tech. at Amherst. 

6 — Tufts at Medford. 
13 — Springfield Training School at Amherst, 

M. A. C, 36; N. C. C, 13. 

After but three nights' practice, the college team 
met Northampton Commercial College in a practice 
game at the Drill Hall. The game was interesting 
in spite of the fact that the teams were hardly evenly 
matched. The Northampton players put up a stiff 
proposition at times, but failed to keep it up. The 
college team played steadily in spite of many shifts 
in the line-up, showed good endurance, skill, and a 
mastery of the signals. Cobb, being out of town, 
did not play at his usual position, which somewhat 
weakened the work of the forwards. Gillett, at cen- 
ter, played a fine game, as did Regan at left back 
and later at left forward. Burke played his usual 
good game at left forward, though was unfortunate in 
not having Cobb for a running-mate. Harris, play- 
ing at left-back for the visitors, gave Whitmarsh a 
hard proposition. The game served principally to try 
out the new men, and shifts in both line-ups were 
frequent. Several fouls were called upon both sides, 
but on the whole the playing was clean and fast. 

The line-up : 

m. a. c. m- c. c. 

Whitmarsh. r. f. 1. b., Harris. Donovan 

Burke. Regan. 1. f r. b.. Burns. Palmer 

Gillett, c. c., Donovan. Burns 

Willis, Tilton, Warner, r. b. 1. f., Lawley, Swift 

Regan. Daniels, 1. b. r. f., Finn. 

Score— M. A. C — 36, N. C. C. 13. Goals from floor— 
Gillett 6. Regan 6, Whitmarsh 2. Swift 3, Burke 2. Daniels. 

Finn. Goals from fouls— Gillett 2, Finn. Time — 20 min- 
ute halves. 



FOOTBALL 

At a meeting of the football men at the Cooley 
House, Springfield, November 16, H. W. Turner, 
1909, was elected captain for the next year. Mr. 
Turner played on the Newtonville High School team. 
This year he has played a remarkably strong game at 



the end position and is fully qualified to lead the team 
next year. At the same time, M. F. Thompson, 
1909, was elected manager, and the names of Louis 
Brandt, 1910 and French 1910 were proposed for 
assistant manager. The two names will be submitted 
to the student body for final election in the near future. 
Men who won their football M this year for the first 
time are Blaney, 1910 ; Leanard, 1910 and Roberts, 
1911. The other M men for this season areas 
follows: 1908, Cobb (captain), Paige, Farley, An- 
derson, Philbrick; 1909, Crosby, Sexton, Turner 
(captain elect), Willis. 

COMPARATIVE SCORES. 



1906. 




1907. 


0— 5 


Williams, 


4— 5 


0—17 


Brown, 


0— 5 




Rhode Island. 


11-0 


0—26 


Dartmouth, 


0— 6 


4— 6 


Holy Cross, 


10 5 




Worcester " Tech " 


29— 


8—12 


Amherst, 


0— 


0—28 


Tufts, 


19—10 


21—4 


Training School, 


5— 


83—98 


78—31 



SIGNAL COMPETITION. 

The editor wishes to call the attention of the 
underclassmen, and particularly of the members of 
the freshman class, to the rules and conditions which 
govern competition for the Signal Board. The 
rules for qualification are as follows: 

"Any male student of the college taking the four 
years cousre may become eligible to the board of edi- 
tors by submitting not later than ten(10)days before the 
annual election (as here-in-after described) three (3) 
articles so written as to clearly indicate the ability of 
the candidate to command the English Language. 
The nature of these articles is left to the discretion 
of those who compete. If there are not a sufficient 
number of eligible candidates, recommendations may 
be accepted from the English department of the col- 
lege. A person having once qualified shall remain 
so as long as he is in college. " 

Elections to the board are made early in March by 
the members of the senior class upon the board, and 
take effect immediately, the seniors retiring after 



/ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









the performance of that duty. Each year two men 
are chosen from the freshman class, two from the 
sophomore class, and one from the junior class. 

There Is unusual incentive this year for making an 
effort to obtain a position upon the board. The 
English Department has promised co-operation 
in the matter of credit for work done. But the main 
Incentive for competitors must be an appreciation that 
the training derived from editorial work is of the great- 
est value, training men to think, express themselves 
and act. One must also feel that loyalty for the col- 
lege and a desire to do one's part in the swing of the 
college life. The articles submitted for competition 
need not necessarily be elaborate. We wish merely 
to see that you can think and have mastered the art 
of expression, and withal that you are a man of the 
college, In sympathy with Its life, and ready to do 
your part. Write up an account of a basketball game, 
a seminar or assembly meeting, an informal dance, 
or, If your aspirations run higher, give us an editorial 
on some vital college question. Don't think it is 
hard, but look upon it as easy, entirely within your 
capacities. We will do the judging, and will lay 
nothing derogatory up against you, even though you 
don't make good the first year. Almost without 
exception, through a remarkable succession of acci- 
dents, the present editors are second and third choice 
men. You may judge for yourselves whether we 
are filling the bill or not. Don't put the matter off 
until too late. Work while the inspiration is with 
you, and train yourself to work up an inspiration for 
the demand. Make your mind and body subject to 
your will. 

The Peabody museum at Yale has received from 
the estate of the late Robert S. Ives, '64, two large 
Egyptian idols, which form a valuable supplement to 
the collection of idols already In the museum. Dr. 
Hiram Bingham, '98, has presented Peabody mus- 
eum with a collection of ethnological objects gathered 
by him during his recent trip through South America. 
The collection includes votive offerings of silver, 
apparel and implements. Prof. R. D. Lull, formerly 
professor of zoology at M. A. C, is making a restor- 
ation of a great horned dinosaur, of which the mus- 
eum has a valuable collection of fossil remains. It 
is expected that the restoration will be ready for exhi- 
bition at the time of the scientific societies' meetings 
In New Haven during December. 



Collet N°**s- 



— The agricultural seminar Tuesday night, Dec. 
3rd, was addressed by S. H. Reed of West Brook- 
field. Mr. Reed is a successful stock and dairy 
farmer, and spoke upon selection of cattle. 

— The vesper service on Dec. 8th was conducted 
by Rev. 0. S. Davis of New Britain, Conn. Mr. 
Davis is a prominent New England preacher and was 
very well received by those who had the good fortune 
to hear him. 

— The program for the public winter meeting of the 
State Board of Agriculture, Dec. 3, 4 and 5, offered 
among other features a lecture by Dr. H. T. Fernald 
upon "Insect Enemies to Fruit Trees." The lecture 
was Illustrated by sterecotlcon. 

— The dynamo at the heating and lighting plant has 
been overhauled and rewired and the engine has been 
put in first class shape. A new boiler larger than 
either of the others has also arrived and will be 
installed as soon as possible. These improvements 
should put that department up to the standard for 
some time. 

— The Y. M. C. A. meeting Dec. 5 was given 
over to a report of the delegates of the college to the 
40th State Convention of the Young Men's Christian 
Association of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, held 
at Taunton, Nov. 8, 9 and 10. The college was 
represented by six delegates and President Butterfield 
at the convention. 

— William E. Spencer of Amherst addressed the 
assembly Wednesday, Dec. 4th, with a talk on 
Mexico. With a few concrete and forceful examples, 
Mr. Spencer illustrated the great differences which 
exist in Mexico of climate, wealth and poverty, and 
the great contrast between the ancient and the modern. 
Mr. Spencer spoke of the political history and present 
political conditions which exist in Mexico, paying trib- 
ute especially to President Diaz. 

— Mrs. J. B. Lindsey, wife of Dr. Lindsey of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, gave a reception 
on the afternoon of Dec. 3 to many women of the two 
colleges and of the town at her home on Lincoln 
avenue. The object of the reception was that the 
wives of the new professors and instructors of the col- 



leges might meet each other and the women of the 
village. Mrs. George Martin and Miss Mary Cook 
poured coffee. Mrs. Billings and Miss Margaret 
Williams served frappe, assisted by Mrs. Sherman 
and Mrs. Ostrander. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

HISTORICAL SKETCHES, BY FRED H. FOWLER, '87. 

/. Solving the Seed. 

It is impossible with the data at hand to fix precisely 
the time when the idea of an agricultural school or 
college entered into the mind of a citizen of this 
Commonwealth and by him was given public expres- 
sion. Possibly such ideas entered simultaneously 
into the minds of several who were interested in and 
working for greater progress in agricultural education. 
Printed expressions of the need of education in agri- 
culture have been found dating as far back as 1796, 
and the advanced agriculturists of those days may 
have been instrumental in calling into existence our 
college of the present day. 

History records that in an address to the Essex Ag- 
ricultural Society in 1820, Andrew Nichols referred to 
Governor DeWitt Clinton of New York as having 
hinted, in an address, "the establishment of 
agricultural schools for the purpose of improving 
the art of husbandry." Mr. Nichols enlarged 
upon this idea by saying " And, is it altogether vision- 
ary to suppose, that the best interests of this county 
would be promoted by the establishment of an agri- 
cultural academy, where such studies as are best 
calculated to make accomplished and scientific farm- 
ers might be advantageously pursued." " Such a 
seminary," he said, " well endowed and properly 
managed, would furnish more useful Instructors for 
town schools In agricultural districts than can now be 
obtained. It would answer all the purposes of a 
pattern-farm, rapidly disseminate knowledge of the 
greatest improvements in the art, and produce the 
most accomplished farmers and useful citizens." 

The Thompson's Island Farm School, in Boston, 
in a recent report, claims to have been the first by 
seventy years to make agriculture the basis of ele- 
mentary education. In a report of this school, in 
1832, statement was made that " It is proposed to 
remove these boys from the city — and to place them 



on a farm where some of the more common mechanic 
trades may be practiced; so that labors in which they 
will be dally instructed and engaged, either in garden- 
ing, agriculture or the useful arts will contribute to 
their health and support and tend at the same time, 
to form in them habits of Industry and order, and 
prepare them to earn their livelihood." 

Steps were taken at an early date to introduce agri- 
cultural studies into existing academies. In 1824 a 
plan for Increasing the usefulness of Dummer Acad- 
emy, in Newbury, by the creation of an agricultural 
department was brought before the trustees. Appli- 
cation was made to the Legislature for aid In found- 
ing a professorship of scientific and practical agricul- 
ture, but the attempt proved unsuccessful. 

The Essex Agricultural Society was requested In 
1840 to advertise a contemplated course of sludy at 
the Teachers' Seminary, in Andover. This was done 
under the head of "Agricultural Seminary." In 
this advertisement it was stated that "Arrange 
ments have been made to introduce scientific 
agriculture as a regular branch of study ; one of 
the teachers has been engaged, during the past 
winter, in investigating agricultural chemistry, 
with a view to give instruction on the subject, 
and to prepare a text book for the use of the students." 
— "The plan of adding scientific agriculture to the 
branches already pursued, originated from the belief 
that scientific agriculture must be made a regular 
branch of study in our literary institutions before we 
can make farmers scientific men, and produce a per- 
manent improvement in our system of rural econ- 
omy." — "We propose to teach them botany and 
physiology, mineralogy, geology, and chemistry with 
its application to agriculture, and to afford them the 
opportunity to witness the operations of tillage under 
the direction of a teacher. " In 1843 the seminary 
was merged into the "English department" of 
Phillips Academy, owing to lack of funds, and evi- 
dently the agricultural department was discontinued, 
as no further records are found. 

In 1856 the selectmen of the town of Westfield, 
trustees of Westfield Academy, and citizens of the 
town, petitioned the Legislature for authority to estab- 
lish an agricultural department in Westfield Academy. 
The reason advanced was " That in order to increase 
its usefulness the Trustees have been desirous of 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



connecting with it an Agricultural Department for 
better instruction than can now be readily obtained in 
the art and science of Agriculture, which design Is 
generally approved by the inhabitants." Necessary 
authority was granted by Acts of 1856, Chapter 148. 
Admission to this department was to be free to the 
inhabitants of the town, upon such conditions as 
might be determined by a board of examiners, to be 
composed of the school committee and an equal 
number of the trustees of the academy. 

At a meeting of the trustees of the Powers Insti- 
tute, in Bernardston, 1859, a committee was chosen 
to memorialize the Legislature for the purpose of ob- 
taining pecuniary aid from the State for an agricul- 
tural professorship. This petition was dated March 
16, 1861, and recited the establishment and growth 
of the institution. It stated that "the Principal of 
the Institute, with the sanction of the Board of Trus- 
tees, established an Agricultural Department In 
said school, in which the elementary and practical 
principles of all the different branches of Agriculture 
should be taught, the same as Geography, Geometry, 
Civil Engineering or Botany have heretofore been 
taught : — that classes have been formed for the Study 
of Agriculture, having regular recitations at stated 
periods — and that considerable progress has, in that 
way, been made in what your memorialists believe to 
be a somewhat new method of studying." 

The State Reform School at Westborough was 
opened for the admission of members in November, 
1848. The object of the school was declared to be 
" for instruction, employment and reformation of 
juvenile offenders." The boys were also instructed 
in some regular course of labor, either mechanical, 
manufacturing, agricultural or horticultural, or a com- 
bination of them, as should be best suited to their 
strength, disposition and capacity. 

The wills of two distinguished Massachusetts citi- 
zens should be referred to in this sketch on ' ' sowing 
the seed." Benjamin Bussey, of Roxbury, by will 
dated July 30, 1835, provided for the establishment of 
a school of agriculture and horticulture, as a depart- 
ment of Harvard College, under the name of "Bussey 
Institution." The organization of this school, how- 
ever, was not begun until the spring of 1870. Oliver 
Smith, of Hatfield, died in December, 1845, and in 
his will left $30,000, which was to increase for sixty 



years after his decease. Then there was to be paid 
to Northampton from the accumulated fund whatever 
amount the trustees considered necessary and proper 
to establish a " Pattern Farm " and an " Experimen- 
tal Farm"; also a "School of Industry." This 
school was to be designated and called " Smith's 
Agricultural School." 



Dfp&r-lmtn4f [Sloths. 

EXPERIMENT STATION, DIVISION OF 
PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

Walter S. Dickinson, '07, who has been employed 
as chemist at the Experiment Station since his grad- 
uation, has resigned, and left for Cuba on Saturday, 
Dec. 7, where he will act as assistant chemist on a 
sugar plantation. 

Mr. E. Thorndike Ladd, '05, has resigned his 
position of assistant chemist of the fertilizer division 
at the Experiment Station, and on Jan. 1st will 
become chemist for Bough & Sons, Philadelphia and 
Baltimore, Manufacturers of fertilizers. Mr. Ladd 
has done excellent work at the Station and is to be 
congratulated in securing a more lucrative and 
responsible position. He will be located at the Balti- 
more factory of the company. 

The recent volume in the Rural Science Series by 
Dr. E. B. Voorhees entitled Forage Crops, contains 
the entire tabulation of Coefficients of Digestibility 
of American Feed Stuffs by Dr. Lindsey and Mr. 
Smith of the Massachusetts Station. The tabulation 
is also to be found complete in the book entitled 
Feeds and Feeding by Professor W. A. Henry. Dr. 
Lindsey began this tabulation in 1896, and it has been 
rendered complete through December 1906. The 
last tabulation was published in the eighteenth report 
of the Massachusetts Station and occupied some 24 
printed pages. It includes all of the results of diges- 
tion Coefficients made in the United States. This 
station has completed more work along this line than 
any other American Station. 

Dr. R. D. McLauren spent the Thanksgiving recess 
with friends in Toronto. 

Mr. P. H. Smith attended the meeting of the 
Cattle Owners Association at Rutland. Mr. W. H. 



Hepburn has completed the annual inspection of 
Babcock machines. 

Mr. J. C. Pomeroy, a graduate of the University of 
Vermont, is engaged in testing cows at the farm of the 
F. T. Field Holstein Co. 

Mr. H.W. Packard, a recent graduate of the Dairy 
Course, Is engaged in similar work for Mr. J. B. 
Marcon at Princeton. 

The station is especially busy at the present time. 
A very complete inventory of the entire laboratory, 
station, barn and creamery has been completed, two 
large bulletins are in preparation besides an annual 
report. The services of two stenographers is required 
to keep up with the work. It is understood that Dr. 
Lindsey is looking for two chemists to take the place 
of those recently resigned. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

The department has recently added to its equip- 
ment a large size plane-table of the make of Young 
and Sons, the first instrument of this make to be 
added to the department's equipment. The plane- 
table is extra large, equipped with paper rolls, ali- 
dade, compass, telescope, with full verttcal circle, 
stadia hairs, levels, etc, 

POMOLOGY. 

The work In senior systematic pomology under 
Professor Sears is being conducted along extensive 
lines unparalleled in previous years. Collections of 
fruit are just now being obtained for class-room work 
from all sections of the country, shipments being 
received from Nova Scotia, Oklahoma, Colorado, 
Kansas, Texas, Michigan, New York, and various 
other fruit growing districts, a new assortment being 
furnished for each exercise. 

HORTICULTURAL SEMINAR. 

An interesting meeting of the Horticultural Semi- 
nar was held Dec. 6, the meeting being given over 
to a few short talks by members of the class (senior) 
upon their experiences while engaged in work upon 
the care of trees during the summer. The speakers 
showed that they have derived much practical experi- 
ence and knowledge from their summer's work, and 
are well qualifed to speak upon and engage in the 
various phases of the work represented. The speak- 
ers of the afternoon were Farrar, Eastman, Philbrick 
and Anderson. 



SUMMER SCHOOL. 

At a meeting of the advisory committee of the 
Summer School in Boston, Nov. 30, plans were dis- 
cussed in their general outline for the coming ses- 
sion. The plans for the next session are rapidly 
assuming shape, and promise a much broader field 
of work, with more instructors, and a much greater 
variety of courses. The field of work has been for 
the present roughly divided into three general classes 
for, 1st, high school science teachers, with at least 
two special courses, and a variety of elective courses ; 
2nd, those interested in technical agriculture, without 
any reference to teaching, though the teachers will be 
urged to take the courses offered under this class; 
3rd, a class of work especially adapted to country 
preachers, this work probably extending two weeks 
after the regular four weeks work. The advisory 
committee is made up at present as follows: Secre- 
tary, George H. Martin of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, Boston, Prof. Paul H. Hanus, Chairman of the 
State Commission on Industrial Education, Cam- 
bridge, acting-principal C. H. Morrill, State Normal 
School, Hyannis, Principal F. F. Murdock, North 
Adams State Normal School, Principal C. A. 
Brodeur, Westfield Normal School, Principal A. C. 
Boyden, Bridgewater Normal School Mr. J. E. War- 
ren, Field Agent State Board of Education, of Wor- 
cester, Principal A. C. Monahan, Montague High 
School. 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The 1909 Junior Prom, will be held Feb. 14, 
1908. For particulars and invitations address 

Myron W. Thompson, Amherst, Mass. 

'71. — William H. Bowker was elected a member 
of the nominating committee of the Massachusetts 
Horticultural society at the annual meeting of the 
society held at Horticultural Hall, Boston, Nov. 16. 

•72.— Prof. J. W. Clark of North Hadley lectured 
recently at the 17th annual meeting of the New 
Hampshire Horticultural society at Exeter on "Pack- 
ing, Storing and Selling Apples." 



y 



IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'82. — Prof. C. S. Plumb was selected one of the 
judges of Rambouillet Sheep at the recent Interna- 
tional Live Stock Exposition at Chicago. 

'92.— Dr. R. P. Lyman, State Veterinarian of 
Connecticut, and Secretary of the American Veteri- 
nary Medical Association, leaves Hartford this month 
to spend ten weeks at the Kansas City Veterinary 
College (the largest Veterinary college in the United 
States) and there he will give a course of lectures on 
"The Principles of Surgery." 

Ex-93. — James Bardin, a prosperous farmer in 
Dalton. 

'94. — Dr. Theodore S. Bacon, of Springfield, has 
recently been appointed to succeed Dr. H. C. Emer- 
son, resigned, as associate medical examiner of that 
district. He has built up a very extensive practice, 
and stands high in the estimation of his fellow- 
physicians as well as among the many people who 
have been his patients. Dr. Bacon was born in 
Natick and is the son of Josiah S. Bacon. He 
received his early education in Natick and later 
attended the Boston public schools. He then 
entered Massachusetts Agricultural College, from 
which he graduated in 1894, and in the same year he 
also received a degree from Boston University. He 
graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1898, 
and for more than a year afterward was gaining valu- 
able experience as a physician in the Boston city 
hospital. In September, 1899, he located in Spring 
field and has been in active practice here since. 
For several years he was physician at the city hospi- 
tal, and for some time he has been an assistant sur- 
geon for the Springfield hospital. He is also surgeon 
for the Boston & Albany railroad, and this alone has 
furnished him no small amount of experience in these 
trying days on the railroad. He is secretary of the 
Hampden District Medical Society, a director of the 
Springfield Academy of Medicine, and a member of 
the American Medical Association and the Boston 
City Hospital alumni. He is a member of Spring- 
field lodge of Masons, Morning Star Royal Arch 
chapter, Springfield Commandery, Knights Templar, 
and Melha temple, Mystic Shrine. Dr. Bacon was 
for a year president of the Springfield Christian 
endeavor Union. Until his profession fully absorbed 
his attention he took a lively interest In musical affairs 



and athletics. Dr. Bacon married Miss Mabel Arms 
Rice of South Deerfield in 1904 and they have one 
daughter. 

'01. — Married at Los Angeles, Cal., Nov. 18, 
Miss Margaret Dallas to Max Shaffrath. 

'01.— T. Fred Cooke, teacher in Pittsfield High 
School. 

'04. — John Fahey, night clerk in Post-office, 
Pittsfield. 

'04.— George E. O'Hearn, '04, captain football 
and baseball '03- '04, has been coaching the Wood- 
bury Forest School football team at Orange, Va. 
His team won the championship of the preparatory 
school league in Virginia. He is now at home in 
Pittsfield. 

'05. — Married at Amherst, Nov. 28, Miss Chris- 
tine Agatha Magee to John J. Gardner. 

'06. — Mrs. Harry S. Andrews announces the 
marriage of her daughter, Eliza Scoville, to Edwin 
H. Scott, Nov. 28, at Sheffield. 

ROSTER OF THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COL- 
LEGE CLUB OF NEW YORK. 

The Faculty: Goodell*, Stockbridge*, Goessmann, 
Morris, Alvord*, Harrington, Parker*, Totten, 
Brooks, Warner, Mills, Paige, Maynard, Merrill, 
Stone, Flint, Wasburne, Winchester, Babson, Ware, 
Waugh, C. H. Fernald, H. T. Fernald and our new 
able executive, President Butterfield. 

Representing other Faculties, alumni associations, 
etc.: Charles O. Flagg, 72, R. I. Agricultural Col- 
lege; Charles S. Howe, 78, Case School Applied 
Science; John H. Washburn, 78, R. I. Agricul- 
tural College and National Farm School ; William 
H. Bishop, '82, Delaware College and National 
Farm School; Prof. William H. Brewer, Sheffield 
Scientific School ; Ephraim Cutter, M. D., LL.D., 
Yale, '52; Hon. William Ives Washburn, Amherst, 
76; Hon. Bainbridge Colby, Williams, '90; George 
B. Willard, '92, (College Signal); Herbert A. 
Paul, '02, victorious football captain; F. H. Stadt- 
muller and Dr. F. M. Hexamer. The address of 
Prof. Ware, once a lecturer at the college in its 
early days and founder of the architectural depart- 
ments of M. I. T. and Columbia, was the direct 
incentive of the present broad teaching of landscape 
gardening at M. A. C. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 



Of the Classes: 71 — Bassett, Blrnie, Bowker, 
Lyman, Russell, Woolson 72 — Bullard, Cole, 
Cutter, J. Clarence*, Flagg, Maynard, Morris, Ober, 
Somers*, Thompson. 73 — Minor, Webb, Welling- 
ton. 74 — Adams, Benedict, A. W. Dickinson*. 
Doubleday, Libbey, William Lyman*, Towns*. 
75 — Barrett, Barrl, Brooks, Jackson Winches- 
ter. 76— Phelps, Root. 77— W. M. Dickinson*, 
Parker*, Southworth*, Urner. 78— Foot, Heath, 
Howe, Hubbard, Lovell, Lyman, Tuckerman, Wash- 
burn. 79 — Chittendon. '80 — Cary, Fowler. 

'81 — Flint*, Peters, Rawson, Warner*, Young. 
'82 — Beach, Bishop, Chase, Cochran, Cutter, 
Holmes, Jones, Kinney, Myrick, Paige, Piatt, Wil- 
liams. '83 — Hevia, Llndsey. '84 — Jones, Lublin. 
'85 — Barber, Chadbourne, Howell, Tekirian, Wood 
hull. '86— Ayres, Eaton, G. E. Stone. '87— 
Allen, Flint. '88— Moore. '89— Huse. 

'91— Arnold, Felt. '92— Haley, Willard. '93— 
Goodrich. '94 — L. E. Goessmann, Greene, Mer- 
w j n , '95 — Billings, Fairbanks, Lane, Morse, '96 
—Kramer, Read, Shepard. '97— Drew, C. I. 
Goessmann. '98— Eaton, Warden, Wright. '00— 
Canto. '01— Wilson. '02— Paul. 

'Deceased. 



Inttrcolltgife-tc. 



There could be no sound criticism of a decision 
by the trustees of Swarthmore college to decline the 
Anna T. Jeanes bequest. A million dollars or more 
was exceedingly tempting, but the conditions imposed 
struck at the precious principle of freedom in the 
administration of an educational trust. Intercolle- 
giate sports may be pernicious, but no college ought 
to bind Itself forever to prohibit them for the sake of 
money. This might be done by one Institution, and 
the experiment might be valuable to all the others, 
yet, as a principle, such a policy would lead to an 
educational slavery to the dead hand if generally 
accepted. The Swarthmore trustees would be given 
credit for intelligent action dictated not by any fear of 
the popular sentiment for intercollegiate sports, but 
by their appreciation of the vital Importance of mak- 
ing the funds serve the college rather than the college 
serve the funds. — Republican. 



THERE are many style-surprises awaiting you in Our Stock of 
swagger Winter Clothes for Men and Young Men. For this month espec- 
ially we're showing some beautiful patterns in Suits and Overcoats and 
the smart styliug, sigh quality and Low Pricing should tempt you to come 
in and see them. 

OUR great strength lies in our capacity for giving most value for the 
money. 

True, we eclipse others in the freshness of oar offeringb, in their 
high-grade quality, and in the excellence of our service, but we know 
that our patrons recognize us primarily as "the givers of good value." 
Not a bad sort of reputation, either, we think. 

CUT OUT THIS AD., bring it with you and we will allow you 10% 
discount from price of goods purchased. 

feft<3C (&&& && 

"•AlWa^s Wclcome-bJy or got 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying, Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal and I will call on you. 

CT^Full Dress Suits to rent. gar-Students' Clothes bought. 



It's Your Next at the 



httRi House Barber Stop 



Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 


1 A. m. to 8 P. M. 


Tuesdays ; 


r «■ 6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


■ « 8 " 


Thursdays, 7 


6 " 


Fridays, • 


r " 8 «« 


Saturdays, ) 


| '• II " 



11 Amity Street, Amiikkst, Mass. 

GOODS FOR MEN 




C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES. IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's 3nn, 



Old South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

KATES, $2.00 FEB, DAT. 

When in " Hstnp." stop with as. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

Grows Strong, Vigorous, Healthy Plants That Resist Disease 

DB. GEORGE K. STONE. Professor of Botany at the Hum 
Agricultural College, and Professor ol I'lnnt Dlt>eat.e» nt the 
Hutch Experiment Station, Amherst, Mass., write* to our 
Agricultural Expert as follows: 

" I will nay that I consider the formula which you 

Prepared for Mr. Prescott and applied by linn on Ids 
eds waa very effectual in controlling the asparagus 
rust. The application of your formula and other fea- 
tures which were carried out In the management of 
these beds convince me that it constituted the best 
demon itratlnn of the control of asparagus rust which 
baa ever been made in this country." 
GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO formed the basis of the 
above mentioned formula. It was used on the asparagus beds 
of C, W. Peiscott., Concord, Mass., the largest individual 
grower of Asparagus In New England. We also offer 

WK ALSO OFFRK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilising materials from New York, Boston, 
Mass., and Charleston, 8. C- 

Onr beautifully illustrated SO page book on " Plant Food 
Problems," is sent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Hole Importers for U. S. of Genuine Peruvian Guano, and 
Manufacturers of High Grade Fertilisers. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 




In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
— our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

'WRIGHT' <Ss DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON 

18 WEST joth ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




"For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



I 



HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Else. 



K. A. THOMPSON, 

Hear First National Bank, AMHERST 



Caps and Gowns 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , Nkw York. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic Block, near Dapot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted for Its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Cloaed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOTNTON, 

MANUFACTURER OP 

SODA V*rATE>KS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ala. Fountain* charged to order. 

KIVKR 3TKETT, NORTHAMPTOM, Mill. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

KfMllitary Work a Specialty ...fij 
Under the Post Office, - - Amherst, Mass. 



OUR IGE GHEfll« SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICE8. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment 

M.A.C.Ajt't, H.M.JISI*IWla»OiV,«0» 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
'« •• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

P&SATISFAOTION OUARANTBBD. 9.^^ 
JT. A. I'TI.KY, Uanagrr. 

Office i 
East IFleasaoat Street. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. *82, 

FLORIST. 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



For a fine Xmas Present try a 

PICTURE PROM M. A. C. 

Come up and look over the collection 



AT THE 



COIvI^EGK STORE. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



t The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothes are made on the New Home Sewing 
Machine, which fact, assure* them of no "ripe" Mothers 
should get one at once as it will do for their children In years 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D. D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AM UK K.ST, MASS. 



DEflTAli ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK AMHERST. MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL BOOMS. 

WILLIAMS 1 BLOCK, ... AMHERST, MASS. 

Office Hours 

& TO IS A.. M., 1-30 TO 6 I»_ M. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gaa administered when desired. 

THURBERS 

VARIETY STORE. 



Connecticut valley street Railway Co. 

AMHERST DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Amherst and Northampton on the hour aad 
half hour from 6.30 a.m. till 10.80 p. M. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.30 a.m. 

Maim Office, Greenfield, Mass. 
John A . Taggart, Supt. 

Northampton Office, 103 Main St. 
C. W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. 

Telephone, Northampton, 135-13. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Are you in need of a 

Dress* SlxLrt? 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75C and 85c. each. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.80 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH, Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amhemt. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



CORRECTED TO OCT. 8, 1906. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m. 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. E. BENTLEY, 

General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

To take home or to send to friends nothing 
is better than a good Potted Plant — Fern, Palm or 
Begonia. 



See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Arthur B. Dorr. L. »• Tourtelotte. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBEK8 IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MA88 



Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CHAS. fl. ELLIOTT CO., 




J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 



THE LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAV- 
ING HOUSE IN THE WORLD. 

Works : 17th Street&LehighAve. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Telephone Connection, 



AEHERST, MASS. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



a. H.TROTT 



PLUME!. STEP & BBS FITTER, 

AND DEALER II STOVES AND RflKGES. 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



Shop 15 i-a North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-1 a. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMI'LETE LINE OK GOODS 
NflTED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



KSTABMHHKD 1861. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKW YORK. 

IMI'OKTKKH MB MAM'I \i I I Kl K» OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOOES. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EI. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



$f 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRaDK. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MA8S. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 

<AKKNfft & ftOMHOUS*, 



twrm, 



AttHast , Ma$$ # 



/ 








THE 



flfoaesacbueette 
Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Shobt Wintkb Coursb in Daiby Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Shobt Course in Bk Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshmsn and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year: Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kxntoh L. Butter«.ld, Amherst, Mass. 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 7 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 




AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 15. 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Glove-, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR ^ PIPES 




ENGLISH 




FINISH 







E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specially. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, HAHD0L1H, GUITAR STRINGS. 



0CCULIST8 PR ESC R IPTIONS FILLED. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



GO TO .... 

Page's Shoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 

With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 

W. R. BROWN 
Savings Hank Block, A.MHKRST 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 15. 1908 



NO. 7 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student* and Alumni are requested to contribute Communications should b« addressed. Collios Sighal. Amhsrst. Mass. Tms Siqhal will be 
vnt to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested te 
■loiifv the Business Manager. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief 

R. H. VERBECK 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L WHITE. 1909, Assistant Ed tor 

0. B. BRICGS. 1 909. Assistant Business Manager 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. w E. ADAMS. 1909. Ahimni Notes. 

J. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletics. E. F. DAMON. 1910. 

H. T WHEELER. 1908. College Notes. w. R CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 

Terms, fl.OO per near in sdcsoce Single Copies. 10c. Postage outside o* Inited States and Canada. Use. srtrs. 



Athetic Association. 
p oot-Ball Association 
:;«met ball Association. 
bjs» Ball Association 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. Fraternity Conference 

M. W. Thompson. Manager 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman. Manager. 
Co!lege Senate. 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indei 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President. 



J R.Parker . Pres. 

R. D. UP, Manager 

C. H. White Pres 

H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Peet Office at Amherst 



Cdi-tori*. 



s. 



In all this early-breakfast business there seems to 
bt but one great, broad object toward which the 
movement on the part of the college authorities is 
lirected. That object is an attempt to develop 
what is called, for want of a better term, 'the higher 
It has been deemed expedient, with this 
worthy object in mind, to request the students board- 
ing at the Dining-hall to take their breakfast at an 
earlier hour, that the twenty-odd men who work at 
the Dining-hall during meal hours may avail them- 
-elves of the opportunity to participate in daily chapel 
services. The twenty-odd men have had this oppor- 
tunity in the past, but either through disinclination or 
inability to leave the Dinning-hall in time did not 
avaii themselves of it. So that is the situation, 
simple, plain, no explanations given, no questions 
d. And the student body objects to the 
.sition. 

The students of Massachusetts Agricultural College 
we thinking men. It must be evident to one who 



knows them as only one can who has lived and min- 
gled with them during the happy days of a college 
course that even those who are apparently most care- 
less and superficial have a philosophical side of their 
nature which challenges the deepest respect. It may 
be a crude philosophy, uncultured, untaught, but 
therefore only the more vital and true. It seems to 
be the working within us of the great laws of the 
Natural World, that craving for all things natural, 
simple, free, and out-of-doors which led us all to 
choose M. A. C. as our alma mater. And as we 
have delved into the study of the natural sciences we 
have come to learn that in nature all things work 
toward the beautiful, the good. Each littlest blade 
or animal tends toward universal perfection. We 
learn the laws of cause and effect as we study still 
further, and recognize that the two are inseparable. 
These things we know, we observe. The cause of it 
all? That we do not know, we can not know. We 
can hypothesize, conjecture, but we can not deter- 
mine. But cause there must be, for whence all this 
effect } So finally the mind quiets its questionings by 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






accepting the unknowable, and we call this Great Cause 
God. And the mind may clothe this Unknown with a 
vast variety of attributes : some may grant it person- 
ality, and clothe it with love. hate, justice, wrath, 
power; some may deny it personality, and hold it sub- 
ject to its own inexorable laws. It matters not this 
is not the end of life, to solve the unknown. We 
observe the working of these Natural Laws within 
ourselves. We note cause and effect. We con- 
ceive our object in life as the same which character- 
izes all other life -the perpetuation of self. And we 
know that we are only a stage in an imperceptible 
evolution which tends toward perfection; that the 
nearest we come to perfection is in our happy 
moments. And then we learn to study ourselves 
from this point of view, and to endeavor to control 
those happy moments. We apply here again the 
laws of cause and effect, we know that there is a 
reaction for every excess, that unkindness and deceit 
punish themselves, that kindness and love reward 
themselves. To express this otherwise, men are, 
punished by their sins and not for them j and rewarded 
by their virtues, not for them. We know that happi- 
ness is largely a matter of stomach and physical con- 
dition. And knowing this we endeavor to keep our- 
selves physically well, again applying the laws of cause 
and effect. Happiness is a habit which may be 
acquired, and he who has acquired it to greatest 
advantage is he who holds himself least subject to the 
petty influences which tend to destroy good. He 
who radiates life, cheerfulness, joy and love is not 
liable to infection with the disease germs of fear, 
malice, hate. And as happiness is a habit, so is 



go at it from a practical, commonsense point of view, 
analyzing, weighing, understanding and knowing what 
we can know, accepting the proposition that s< 
things are unknowable. 

The point of this writing, which has taken a sort 
of crude philosophical turn, is simply this. So long 
as you try to stimulate this • -higher life" by laying 
down rules of an exacting nature which infringe upon 
the natural laws of convenience, comfort, volition and 
goodwill, you are but awaking a counter force whlcl 
tends to destroy rather than create. Thoughts which 
are beautiful, true and good came stealing in to this 
hard, matter-of-fact consciousness of ours like cool 
and gentle breezes into a weary metropolis at evening 
The body and mind are taken possession of by th 
divine in us all. You cannot storm the citadel, 
excepting it bear the name Ignorance. Volition' 
Yes, we prize our freedom, and above all our freedom 
of thought and conscience. It is the reign of on. 
man over himself, mentally, morally, physically 
which is Utopia. You can't thrust the "higher life" 
upon him if he has it not already within himself. 

The frank, business-like manner in which Mr 
Kenney presented the board question to the student 
body deserves commendation as a step toward th . 
wholesome understanding between college authorities 
and students which all have wished for, but which 
has been so singularly lacking. The students, on 
their part, are to be commended for the frank mar 
with which they discussed and disposed of the quer, 
tion at that time. By vote of the student body 
price of board has been raised to $3.75 per weeV 
order to preserve the same quality of service at th- 



The ignorant and the weak have been kept in Dini ng-hall, this price to go into effect the beginning 

-r L - r j-.,. _.„ a. »u*> dine timp it was voted t 



fear. 

subjection all a-down the ages by fear. The founders 
of early religions and creeds recognized this, and used 
it to good advantage. But only as man can eliminate 
fear from his life can he be free in the glory of his 
own thought and being. And that is the glory of this 
present age of ours, free thought and being. The 
man who thinks does not worry about salvation and a 
world to come. He accepts his present condition 
and makes the best of it, knowing that the greatest 
blessing of this life is work, cheerfully and well done. 
He does not impair his usefulness here and now by 
speculating and worrying about a life to come of 
which he knows and can know nothing, And so we 



of next semester. At the same time it was voted I 
discontinue the Sunday night supper. For the be 
fit of outsiders who may have heard of a def.c 
the college dining-hall through certain newspaper. . 
may be well to give the figures of said deficit, mas 
much as the newspapers referred to published errone 
ous reports. The deficit for the three month 
September, October and November was $426.£ 
or 23 cents per week for each boarder at the Dm 
hall The deficit carried over from previou 
that' time was $2,760.15, making a total deficit c 
$3,187.00. In newspaper accounts this total d«-fi> -■ 



was assigned to last year, — an erroneous statement. 

As the approach of the fraternity rushing season 
makes itself felt it seems well for all of us to brush 
up a little on the rushing rules laid down by the Frater- 
nity Conference. These rules are to be complied 
with in spirit as well as letter. May it be remem- 
bered that a breach of the rules is considered the 
height of dishonor. All together, now, for a good 
clean season. 

Athletic No-Us- 



BASKETBALL. 

The basketball season thus far can not be called a 
decided success. The team took an extended north- 
ern trip before the holidays playing the University of 
Vermont, St. Laurence University, Potsdam Normal 
School, and Fort Covington. The team was handi- 
capped by strange floors and hard traveling and failed 
to get away with any victories. 

At present there seems to be a lack of interest in 
the game and few of those who are playing on the 
team or who are trying for it are showing the spirit or 
doing the training that is expected of men who go 
out for baseball and football and should be shown by 
the basketball team if it expects to retain the confi- 
dence and support of the student body. 

There is a growing sentiment in college in favor of 
cancelling the remainder of the schedule, but with the 
splendid schedule that Manager Jennison has arranged 
and material enough in college for at least as good a 
team as last year, it seems as if the season should be 
carried through. Let all those connected with the 
sport forget their likes and dislikes and do something 
for Massachusetts that will be a credit to the college 
and to themselves. 

University of Vermont, 22; M. A. C II. 

University of Vermont defeated M. A. C. at 
basketball Dec. 17 by a score of 23 to II. The 
game was witnessed by a large number of people and 
was much more interesting and closely contested 
than the score indicates, Massachusetts outpassing 
Vermont but not blocking as well as the University 
team. Gillett scored the first basket of the game 
after seven minutes of play and Watkins scored for 



Vermont a few moments later. The first half ended 
with the score 8 to 6 in favor of Vermont. In the 
second half Massachusetts was slow in getting started 
and Vermont scored several baskets in the first four 
or five minutes of play. Gillett played a good con- 
stant game for Massachusetts. Regan excelled at 
gard and Cobb got in a couple of one-handed shots 
from the middle of the floor. 
The score : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

I- £■ Regan 

r. g., Farley. Daniels 

c. Gillett 

I. f.. Burke 

r f.. Cobb 

Holcomb, Buck 2, Hosmer. 



UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT. 

Pauquet. Buck. r. f. 
Watkins (capt.), 1. f. 
Cassidy. Dodge, c. 
Howard, Hosmer. r. g. 
Holcomb. 1. g. 

Goals— Watkins 5. Cobb 2. 
Paquet. Gillett Regan. Burke. Goal from fouls— Holcomb 
Cobb. Referee Thomas. Timer — Dr. Cloudman. 

St. Lawrence, 33; M. A. C, 16. 

The team met with defeat at Canton, N. Y., Dec. 
18, at the hands of the St. Lawrence University 
quintette, the final score being 33 to 16. A slippery 
floor, uncertain outside lines and a hard trip the two 
previous days combined to make the work of the 
visitors ineffective. The home team excelled in all 
features of the game, particularly passing, Black 
(captain) being the star player for St. Lawrence. 
For the college men, Burke and Regan excelled. A 
line-up of the game could not be obtained. 

Potsdam Normal, 28; M. A. C, 5 

The score of the game Dec, 19 with Potsdam 
Normal School has been officially made known by 
telegram as follows : 

Twenty-eight to five favor Normal team. 

F. S. Jones, Manager. 

Fort Covington, 30: M. A. C, 23. 

The score of the game Dec. 20 with the Fort Cov- 
ington basketball team has been officially made known 
by telegram as folllows : 

Score half time 15 to 15. Finish, Amherst 23, 
Fort Covington 30. 

H. C. Taillon, Manager. 

Holy Cross. 51 ; M. A. C, 4. 
Holy Cross defeated the Massachusetts Agricul 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tural College in a one-sided game in the Holy Cross 
gymnasium Jan. 8. The playing of the purple team 
was very fast, dribbling and passing all around the 
M. A. C. players. Dowd of Holy Cross was high 
scorer, getting 12 baskets, equalling the gymnasium 
record. Cobb got the only score for M. A. C. from 
midfloor. Cassey scored the other goal by accident- 
ally batting the ball into the Holy Cross basket as he 
tried to get away from an M. A. C. man. The game 
was very clean, only one foul being called. The 
visitors were undoubtedly handicapped by the posts of 
the college gymnasium, which are within the playing 
court and require a different sort of game from that 
to which they were accustomed. 
The line-up: 



KHODE ISLAND. 

r. g.. Craig 
1 g.. Mitchell 
c. Whipple 
r. f.. Drew 
I. f. Smith 
Goals from floor- 
Regan 2. Parley. 



HOLY CROSS. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 



Daniels, Neale 

1. b.. Regan 

c. Cillett 

r. f.. Cobb 

1. f.. Burke 



Stevens, 1. f. 
Dowd, Roddy, r. f. 
Casey. Walsh, c 
O'Neil. Callahan. 1. b 
Barry. Larkin. r. b. 

Baskets from the floor— Dowd 12. Stevens 8. Casey 2. 1 
for M .A. C. Walsh 1. O'Neil 1 Cobb 1. Baskets on free 
try— Stevens. Foul -- Burke. Referee-P. W. Hehir. 
T i mers _j. E. Mansfield. Holy Cross ; W. F. Woodward. M. 
A. C. Scorer— Joseph J. O'Connor. Holy Cross. Time— 
20-minute halves. 

M. A. C. 32: Rhode Island, 14. 
The Massachusetts Agricultural College basketball 



team defeated Rhode Island Saturday evening at 
Amherst by the score of 32 to 14 in an interesting 
but rather roughly-played game. The first half was 
cleanly played, not a single foul being called, but in 
the second half both sides indulged in football tactics 
and several fouls were called on both sidts. Massa- 
chusetts took the lead at the start and was never 
headed, the first half ending with the score of Massa- 
chusetts 14. Rhode Island 6. In this half Smith 
made a clever one-handed throw while closely 
guarded. Gillette caged the ball three times and 
kept his opponent from scoring. Regan made two 
pretty goals, one an overhead throw, but missed a 
number of easy tries. In the second half, Cobb 
played a strong game for M. A. C. getting four 
goals, batting two of them into the basket from mid- 
air. Burke made three goals in this period. 
Mitchell played a strong game for Rhode Island. 



The line-up : 

M. A. . 

Burke. 1. f. 
Cobb. r. f. 
Gillette, c. 
Regan, Farley. 1. g. 
Neale. Daniels, r. g. 

Score— M. A. C. 32. Rhode Island 14. 
Cobb 4. Gillette 3. Neale 3. Burke 3. 
Mitchell 3. Smith 2. Drew. Craig. Referee-Danah. . 
Amherst. Timer— Jennison. M. A. C. 

1910, 10: 1911. 6. 
The sophomore freshman basketball game came 
off Dec. 20. The game immediately developed into 
a blocking contest. Morse started the scoring by 
dropping a pretty one in from the side of the hall. 
Burke tied the score although closely guarded by 
Gray. Leonard shot two in quick succession, while 
Morse secured another for the freshmen. This 
finished the scoring for the first half. The score 
being 1910—6, 1911—4. when time was railed. 

Both teams came back with a do-or-die spirit, the 
playing being hard and fast. Substitutes were put in, 
which kept the game lively. Leonard secured his 
third basket. Morse quickly following with his third. 
Burke ended the scoring with a pretty overhand basket. 
Leonard and Burke excelled for 1910, while Morse 
and Lew featured for 1911. 

Line-up. — 

1911. 

r. f.. Morse 

I. f.. Smith. Fitzgerald. Sharpc 

c. Daniels 

1. g.. Lew 

r. g. Grey 

Goals from floor — Leona' 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1910. 

Brandt. Neilson. 1. g. 
Leonard. Blaney. r. g. 
Schermerhorn. c. 
Waldron. Allen, r. f. 
Burke. 1. f. 

Score— 1910. 10; 1911 6. 
Morse 3. Burke 2 Referee— Cobb. Timer— Nealr. 



METTAWAMPE. 

Saturday. Jan. 4. was scheduled on tne Metta 
wampe program as "Ladies' Day." members \ the 
ciub and other students entertaining during the after 
noon and evening fair friends from the surrounding 
country-side. The program of the afternoon was 
ushered in upon the college pond at 2-30 with a flurry 
of snow-flakes, the festivities of the afternoon tak 
ing the form of a skating carnival. But the go i 
the Storm (we will not be so unkind as to infer that 
the college weatherman was guilty) hurled down 
wrath upon the innocents beneath, and, tho n 



braved the storm for an hour or so, all eventually 
sought havens of shelter and comfort where they 
might while the time away until the evening hours 

uld again set the nerves a-tingle with innocent 
pleasure. Shortly before 8-00 the couples began to 
arrive at the Drill Hall, which during the afternoon 
had undergone a pleasant transformation at the hands 
of faculty members and faculty wives. The upper 
end of the hall was screened off with a huge net hung 
with sprays of hemlock, while the balcony-rail and 
walls were relieved of their bareness with bougns of 
the same fragrant evergreen. The platform for the 
orchestra was placed against the west side of the hall, 
and surrounded with a profusion of hemlock sprays 
and potted foliage plants. Nearby stood a stand from 
which punch, prepared by ladies of the faculty, was 

■ ed. The college orchestra struck up the music 
shortly after eight, ft seemea at first as if the god 
of Music was also frowning upon the occasion, but the 
musicians soon struck their proper pace, and dancing 
continued until about 10-30, when imminent fear of 
being left in total darkness caused the party to break 
up, well satisfied with the day's enjoyment, and duly 
grateful to those whose generosity and good will had 
made all possible. 

DR. ARMAGNAC. 

The college was the scene of a sad incident Wednes- 
day morning, Jan. 8 — the death of Dr. August Armag- 
nac, instructor in French and Spanish in the Depart- 
ment of Modern Languages since October Dr. 
Armagnac was conducting a French exercise at the 
time.no one suspecting anything unusual until he sank 
into his chair in an unconscious state. Members of 
the class and others summoned to assist did their 
best to revive the stricken professor and maintain 
respiration, but when the doctor arrived death had 
already claimed its victim, the doctor pronouncing 
apoplexy as the cause. 

Dr. Armagnac had been connected with the 

college only a short time, and so was not very well 

known except perhaps by those in his immediate 

lasses. Those who knew him best pay tribute to his 

iy disposition, his genial nature and great kind 

heart. He died engaged in the work to which his 

was devoted, an earnest worker to the very last. 

In this it would seem that he was indeed favored. 



We can ask no greater privilege in this world than to 
work, faithfully and well, until death shall call us to 
depart for the great unknown. There is a blessing in 
cheerful, faithful work, a blessing which constitutes 
our greatest claim upon a Life Beyond. Dr. Armag 
nac was happy in the realization ot that blessing. 

A brief survey of Dr. Armagnac 's life is as follows : 
Graduating from Princeton University in 1865, he 
immediately began teaching in the Pennsylvania Mil 
itary College at Chester, Pa., where he taught eight 
years. From 1873 to 1880 he was principal of 
Irving Instititute at Tarrytown, N. Y. He became 
professor of Greek at Indiana University in 1881 and 
taught for three years, when he became head master 
and modern language instructor in the De Mille 
school New Jersey. He held this latter position 
until 1903. He had been living quietly in Amherst 
for about a year when he was called upon to fill the 
place of Mr. Herrick. who resigned last October. 
He is survived by a widow and a son, A. S. Armag- 
nac of Montclalr, N. J., and two daughters, Mrs. H. 
0. Packard of Amherst and Miss Helen Armagnac 
of Montclair, N. I 



THE 1909 INDEX. 

The 1909 Index made its appearance Thursday. 
January 9. It immediately strikes one as a nicely 
bound book, the covers being of cloth covered board, 
maroon, stamped in gold and white with the college 
seal and the words " Index Annual of ye Junior Class, 
Massachusetts Agricultural College," The book is 
dedicated to Dr. Charles Anthony Goessmann. the 
dedicatory being written by Dr. Wellington. This Is 
followed by a prologue in verse, after which occur the 
usual statistics. The class histories are unusually good. 
The statistics gone through with, we come to a 
series of historical accounts of great interest by 
alumni, after which come the athletic records of 
'varsity and class teams. Then follow the editorials, 
rather inferior for a college annual, and after wad 
ing through a few more statistics, all necessary in 
view of the nature of the book, we come to the 
•' grinds," an exceptionally good collection. These 
are followed by the personals, which are apt to strike 
one as a bit too long and as getting a little too personal 
in places for the proper spirit of mere fun. Alumni 
chronicles follow, and show exceptional care and 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




effort in the preparation. The book contains 286 
pages of matter and 21 pages of advertisements, and 
thus is the largest Index in point of number of pages 
of any ever published. 

From the point of literary merit the 1909 Index is 
not above ordinary, with the exception of the verse, 
which is undoubtedly the best seen in the Index for 
years The work of the artists deserves commenda- 
tion as perhaps as good as ordinarily is observed in 
college annuals, but in comparison with the superb 
work of the 1908 artist it must appear decidedly in- 
ferior The 1909 Index Board is to be congratulated 
especially on its alumni list, which is probably more 
complete and accurate than ever published before. 
As a whole the book is very creditably gotten up, 
reflecting care and thought and effort in the prepara- 
tion, and an entire worthiness of the college and class 
which It represents. 



Collet N<>*«S- 



The new boiler at the Heating Station is in place. 
The 1909 Index made its appearance Thursday, 



Jan. 9. 

There will be an Informal Dance in the Drill Hall, 

Jan. 18. 

The vesper services on Jan. 5 were conducted by 
Rev. A. P. Reccord of Springfield. 

Prof H A. Bridgeman of the editorial staff of tne 
Congregationalist conducted the Sunday services 

Jan. 12. 

DeanWaughof the Summer School has gotten 
out a neat little announcement for the coming session 

of 1908. 

On Friday evening, Dec. 27, several members of 
the College Shakespearean Club held an informal 
banquet in Young' s hotel, Boston. 

The Drill schedule has been arranged so that the 
whole battallion meets on Monday, and on each of 
the other days one company is excused. 

An attempt was made to flood the surface of the 
pond Friday, the 10th, but owing to the snow on the 
surface and the cold weather it was rather 
unsuccessful. 



Out of respect for Dr. Armagnac, the organ recital 
on Wednesday afternoon was postponed. The after- 
noon exercises on Thursday were also omitted. 

The vesper services Dec. 12 were conducted by J. 
Ross Stevenson of the Fifth Avenue church of New 
York. Mr. Stevenson spoke at Amherst College 
church in the morning. 

The regular weekly meeting of the Young Men's 
Christian Association Dec. 12 was addressed by John 
Pierpont of Williamsburg. Mr. Pierpont has a par 
ish in Williamsburg, and proved to be an interesting 
speaker. 

At the meetings of the American Society of Ver 
tebrate Paleontologists in New Haven dur.ng the 
Christmas holidays Prof. Richard S. Lull, formerly 
of the Zoological department of this college, was 
chosen president. 

O B. Briggs, '09. was elected vice-president of 
the Federation of Agricultural clubs of New England 
Land Grant Colleges. The forming of this federa 
tion was one of the Important features at the dedica 
tion of Morrill Agricultural Hall, Vermont Agricul 
tural College. 

The student committee appointed by the college 
senate to develop plans for a college union together 
with the committee appointed from the faculty for 
the same purpose have arranged for a series of enter 
tainments and talks to be given in the dining hall 
during the winter. 

The Waltham Education Society has booked Pro 
fessor Waugh in its lecture course for this winter. 
His date is March 4 and the subject "The Fine Art 
of Gardening. ' ' Professor Waugh will also speak on 
Agricultural Education before the Peninsula Horticul 
tural society at Salisbury, Md.. Jan. 14. 

Professor Sears's name appears on the annual lee 
ture program of the Massachusetts Horticultural 
Society. He will hold the boards at Horticultural 
Hall on Jan. 18, 1908, with a lecture on "Oppor 
tunities for Commercial Apple Growing in New Eng 
land." Professor Sears is to be one of the lecturers 
before the Worcester Horticultural Society this win 
ter also. 

A college supper was held Saturday night, Jan. II, 
at Draper Hall, an entertainment being offered after 
wards under the auspices of the college Social Union 



in the form of a reading by Mr. Burnett of Amherst 
Mr. Burnett rendered an excellent reading of Marion 
Crawford's "The Upper Berth." fascinating his audi- 
ence, and holding their intense interest and apprecia- 
tion for nearly an hour. 

The horticultural students in Cornell have insti- 
tuted a new scheme this year by holding a fruit show 
under their own direction. They secured contribu- 
tions of fruit from many different growers in the sfate 
and from a good many colleges and private parties 
outside the state. Altogether they had on exhibition 
iiething like 1000 plates of fruit. The Depart- 
m of Pomology of Massachusetts Agricultural 
College sent on several plates for exhibition and was 
awarded a blue ribbon. 

During the holiday recess President Butterfield 
t to Madison. Wis., where he attended the meet 
mg of the American Economic Association and also 
the meeting of the editors of the "Agricultural His- 
f of the United States." who are working for the 
-negie lnstituiton at Washington. Dr. H. T. Fer- 
nald journeyed to Chicago, where he attended the 
meeting of the American society for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 
The Faculty has voted: 

I . That the course in Freshman Trigonometry be 
increased from two to three hours. 

That the course in Sophomore Surveying be 
.ncreased from two to three hours. 

3. That the course in Sophomore Physics be sus- 
pended for the current college year. 

The above votes take effect at the beginning of the 
second semester. 

The Faculty also voted, that the second semester 
tor this college year shall begin Monday, Feb. 10, at 
. m. Provision will be made for registration and 
enrollment of all students during the week of Feb. 3. 
Schedule of examinations and hours for registration 
and enrollment will be announced by bulletin. 

Three courses of study not given in the last cata- 
logue were recently announced in chapel. Two of 
the courses, Rural Law by Judge Lyman, and Rural 
Social Science by President Butterfield. were offered 
last year. The third is termed "Vocational Educa- 
tion" and will be given by Professor Hart. This 
course is intended to give a survey of those move- 



ments in educational history which have some specific 
vocation as their chief motive. It will include a crit 
ical study of the growth and meaning of schools of 
medicine, of law, of oratory, of theology, of knight 
hood, of education, of agriculture, giving most 
emphas.s to the schools of agriculture. There will 
be lectures, library readings, reports and written dis 
cussions of some phases of agricultural education. It 
will be given three hours per week during the second 
semester. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

As an alumnus of the college I wish to commend 
most heartily the vesper services held each Sunday 
afternoon at five o'clock. President Butterfield is 
making considerable effort to give the student body 
opportunity to hear preachers of State and National 
reputation, and it is believed that he should be loyally 
supported in his undertaking. I have been disap- 
pointed to see Lome of these services so poorly 
attended and fail to understand it. 

For example, the speaker at the service held Dec. 
15 was the Rev. Dr. Stevenson, pastor of the Fifth 
Avenue Presbyterian Church of New York, one of 
the most prominent in the city. Dr. Stevenson 
preached at the Amherst College church in the morn 
ing and most kindly consented to speak to our stu- 
dents in the afternoon. Every man in college should 
have been present and thus have shown his apprecia- 
tion of the kindness of the speaker and caught the 
inspiration of his message. Wny is it, young men, 
that you fail to take advantage of such golden 
opportunities ? 

J. B. Lindsey. '83. 



Auburn, Ala.. Jan. 7. 1908. 
College Signal, Amherst. Mass., 

Dear Editor : — I am sure that the students 
and alumni of the college will be interested to know 
of an action taken by a group of the alumni who 
attended the entomological meetings recently held in 
Chicago in connection with the annual meetings of 
thfe American Association for the Advancement of 
Science. 

After enjoying a very pleasant and informal dinner 
together, we were glad to hear from Dr. H. T. Fer- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



nald of some of the important forward steps that have 
recently been taken by the college. Together with 
the undergraduate body we rejoice at every improve- 
ment and success that raises higher the efficiency 
and good name of our beloved college. 

A report was given in regard to the Alumni Ento- 
mological Prizes of 1907. There have been sixteen 
contributors to these prizes and the number who are 
interested is constantly increasing. In order to 
insure the regular support of this project, to draw 
more closely together the graduates and students who 
are following entomological work, to increase mutual 
acquaintance and helpfulness, it was decided to form 
some sort of a permanent organization which might 
secure these ends. 

In spite of the protests of Dr. H. T. Fernald, who 
was present at the meeting, it was voted to adopt the 
name "The Fernald Entomological Club." The 
name is an expression of our appreciation of the two 
men under whom the Department of Entomology at 
M. A. C. has attained a reputation for giving thor- 
ough training in entomological work which is second 
to no other in the country or in the world. It was 
the general understanding that any graduates or 
former students or instructors from M. A. C. might 
become members of this club which stands primarily 
for interest in entomological work. It is expected 
that an annual meeting will be arranged for at the 
time of the annual meeting of the Association of 
Economic Entomologists to which a large majority of 
our men belong. In this association the M. A. C. 
men number more than twenty members. Many 
more are engaged in entomological work and will 
therefore be interested in this club. 

Very sincerely yours, 

W. E. Hinds. 



Another move toward the closer co-operation of 
Boston University students and faculty has been made 
in the appointment by the board of instruction of the 
college of liberal arts of a so-called prudential com- 
mittee. This consists of three undergraduates and 
three professors, and its duties will be to solve such 
problems as pertain to the students and which are not 
exactly in the realm of the administrators. The par- 
amount idea is to give the undergraduate body a voice 
in the affairs in which it is directly interested, 



TWENTY-SECOND ANNUAL REUNION AND 

BANQUET OF THE MASSACHUSETTS 

AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB 

OF NEW YORK. 

The time and place: December 6th, 1907; St. 
Denis Hotel. 
Toastmaster : — Winfield Ayres, M. D.. '86. 
Guests:— President Butterfield, Professor H. T. 
Fernald, Trustee M. F. Dickinson, Amherst, '62, 
Samuel E. Armstrong, M. D., Union, '85. and 
George R. Cobb. '08, captain of the football team. 

Class representation ; -Cole, 72; Minor and Webb. 
'73; Barrett and Winchester, '75; Urner. '77. 
Foot, Lyman and Washburn, '78: Chapin, '81 ; 
Beach, Chase and Cutter, '82 ; Jones and Lublin. 
'84; Howell and Tekirian, '85 ; Ayres. '86; Felt. 
Gay and Sawyer, '91; Billings, Foley, Lewis and 
Morse, 85: Leslie. '01; Plumb. '02; Blake, '04. 
Allen, '05 and Cutter 07. 

The attendance was the largest in the history ot 
the Club ; ten men of the class representation were 
newly present. 

President Butterfield thoroughly presented the con- 
dition and needs of the institution, to some present 
who have not been at their Alma Mater for many 
years, it is hard to appreciate the growth in buildings, 
teaching force and students ; but the most lasting im- 
pression of President Butterfield's address was that the 
trustees in choosing him had done more than well and 
that the college is going to do things which its found- 
ers never hoped for. 

Professor Fernald in a well balanced address re 
sponding to the toast, "The President of the M. A. 

C," and a more difficult one could not be given a 

man, than to speak on his own chief— carried us in 
other lines into the heart of things, well supplement 
ing his executive head. 

Mr. Dickinson, for the first time present, gave 
thanks that under the by-laws of the Club he was a 
bona-fide member of an M. A. C. organization, 
(membership is limited to former and present mem 
bers of the trustee and teaching boards and former 
students and graduates, who may attend a dinner) 
Speaking on the birth and perilous times of the institu- 
tion, he showed how Clark raised the $75,000.00 in 
the town of Amherst for its location therein: broadly 



he sketched the further work of Clark. Goodell. Stock- 
bridge and Goessmann ; to the older men. who knew 
and received benefits from his parents and who so 
well loved his distinguished brothers. Asa and Captain 
Walter. Mr. Dickinson's presence was as if we had 
foregathered again with those now in the beyond. 

Dr. Armstrong, present as one who had sent his 
son to M. A. C.| voiced his high appreciation of the 
loyalty to Alma Mater exhibited in this reunion and 
extolled the work Massachusetts had done in leading 
the nation In many pedagogic lines. 

Captain Cobb, in a forceful and entertaining address, 
reviewed the work of the football team and earnestly 
emphasized the need of a well equipped athletic field. 

Further addresses were made by Messrs. Webb, 
Barrett, Washburn and others. 

On motion it was duly voted to instruct the Secre 
tary to memorialize the General Court as to our ap- 
preciation of the value of the education given at M. 
A. C. and of the many years of support of the State; 
and of the changes in rural population, which with 
the normal growth in number of students, further in- 
creases the necessity of greater financial support as 
to buildings, equipment and endowment. 

Officers elected: — Charles E. Lyman, 78, Presi- 
dent; Alfred W. Lublin, '84, Vice-President: Profes- 
sor Henry E. Chapin, '81. 2d vice- President; Dr. 
Charles T. Leslie. '01 . 3d Vice-President; Sanford 
D. Foot, 78, Choragus ; Alvan L. Fowler. '80, 
Treasurer and John A. Cutter, '82, Secretary. 

■ I,...-.-.. ^^^— 

WESTERN ALUMNI MEET. 

The annual reunion and banquet of the Western 
Alumni Association of M. A. C. was held in the 
Tower Room of the Union League Club. Chicago, on 
the 5th of December, with 15 members present. 

It was voted to make no change in the list of offi- 
cers for the ensuing year. 

The speeches of the evening were informal in 
character, but nevertheless highly interesting. Mr. 
C. S. Plumb, professor of Animal Husbandry at 
the Ohio State University spoke at length on the 
work of his department, and placed stress upon the 
remarkable advancement of the same during the past 
25 years. Mr. L. R. Taft. '82, professor of Hor- 
ticulture at the Michigan Agricultural College, gave 
an interesting talk on horticulture and landscape work 



being carried out at Lansing, citing many interesting 
facts concerning the financial status of various land 
grant colleges. The football records of the season 
were read by Mr. P. C. Brooks, and many congrat- 
ulatory remarks were nude concerning the good 
showing of the college team. A letter from Presi- 
dent Butterfield was read by the Secretary, in which 
a brief regime of the college year was given, and the 
good work of the institution was shown by the in 
creased student enrollment, and by the growing in 
terest in the various lines of study, facts which 
were received with keen appreciation by those present. 
Respectfully, 

M. H. West, Secretary. 



ANOTHER ONE. 

The dean of the Summer School is frequently in 
receipt of letters like the following from members of 
last year's Summer School: 

"You may be interested to know that my brother 
(name and address given) is considering entering the 
Agricultural College next fall. He is a senior in the 
Taunton High School, a sergeant in the high school 
cadets, and has always lived on a farm. I hope he 
will decide to attend M. A.C.. for, once attending the 
Summer School, I realize something of the efficient 
work done there, and 1 take pleasure in speaking a 
good word for the College." 

This letter was also accompanied by a list of 
addresses to whom announcements of courses should 
be sent. The support of the school teachers through 
out the state is going to mean a lot for M A. C. 



Dfpar-tmtrvf fJot?s. 



ENTOMOLOGY. 
The American Association of Economic Ento- 
mologists have recently establised a Journal of Eco- 
nomic Entomology, with Dr. E. P. Pitt as editor-in- 
chief. A. F. Burgess as assistant editor and with Dr. 
Fernald on the advisory board. 

THE LIBRARY. 

Over three hundred new volumes have recently 

been added to the library, principally in the depart 

mentsof English and Pedagogy. Some of the new 

volumes are of great interest and value, among which 



.1 I 



10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 



may be mentioned a new Riverside edition of Haw- 
thorne's Works in twenty-two volumes, profusely 
illustrated, the Works of Rabelais, the greatest of 
French humorists, and ranking with Lucien and Swiff 
as a satirist ; Plutarch's Morals in five volumes; John- 
son's Lives of the Poets; The Life and Letters of 
Erasmus; James Freeman Clark's Self-culture, a 
work of great inspiration to students especially; Ham- 
mertoes The Intellectual Life, another work for a 
student's library; a new member of the Nature 
series, namely, Mosses and Lichens by N. L. Mar- 
shall which enables one to become quite easily 
acquainted with those somewhat obscure forms 
of plant life; Kruth on The Pollination of Flowers, 
the latest and most critical work on that subject ; 
and a work of more immediate interest to us by W. 
Johnson on Four Centuries of the Panama Canals. 
EXPERIMENT STATION. DEPARTMENT OF 
PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 
Two assistants have been added to this department 
in place of Mr. Dickinson and Mr. Ladd who have 
recently resigned. One of the new assistants is P. 
B Goldsmith, a recent graduate of the Michigan 
Agricultural College and the other. J. C Read, from 
the University of Vermont. 

This department is planning to take charge of the 
work of the mechanical analysis of soils which has 
been formerly done by the botanical department. 

Improvements in the ventilation of the hoods in the 
laboratories are projected, as the old hoods allowed 
the escape of some of the gases into the room which 
made it unpleasant for those working there. 



The following M. A. C. men attended the meeting 
of the American Association for the advancement of 
Science at Chicago recently, and afterwards held an 
M. A. C. reunion and supper W. E. Hinds, A. W. 
Hooker, F. A. Burgess, Dr. E. P. Felt, L. Taft. Dr. 
Fernald and R. I. Smith. 



Alumni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Connecticut Valley Association of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College Alumni will hold its 
annual reunion and banquet at the Draper Hotel, 
Northampton on the evening of Feb. 21st. A rous- 
ing meeting is anticipated and the entire college 
faculty is expected to be present. All alumni and 
former students are cordially invited not only to come, 

but to extend this notice. 

H. D. Hemenway, Sec. 



In the list of available lectures and their subjects 
printed in the regulations of the Massachusetts Board 
of Agriculture concerning Farmers' Institutes we are 
glad to note that of sixty three speakers half of them 
rank among M. A. C. graduates, faculty, or trustees. 
'82.— The Phelps Publishing Company of Spring- 
field, of which Herbert Myrick is president, I 
recently completed an eight story building in that city. 
The floor space of this plant covers 7 I -4 acres. 
92. Edward E. Clark. Hudson, farmer. 
•92. A. T. Beals. 138 W. 42nd St.. New York 
City. 

'92— George E. Taylor, Farmer. Shelburne. Post- 
office Greenfield. 

'92. — M. H. Williams, Veterinary Surgeon, 
Sunderland. 

•93.— Charles A. Goodrich. M. D., Physician and 
Surgeon. 5 Haynes St.. Hartford. Conn. 

•93. — Eugene H. Lehnert. D. V. S., Professor of 
Veterinary Science and Physiology at Connecticut 
Agricultural College. Storrs, Conn. 

'93. John R. Perry. Decorating Artist and Con- 
tractor. 8 Bosworth St., Boston. 

'94. -John E. G if ford, Worthy Overseer of the 
state grange, was one of the speakers at the annual 
convention of the Massachusetts state grange, recently 
held at Pittsfield. 

•94_Born on Nov. 27. 1907, Priscilla. first 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Keith of Fitchburg. 
'95. —The Association of Economic Entomologists 
held its twentieth annual meeting. Dec. 27 28, 1907 
at Chicago, 111. Albert F. Burgess. Entomologist in 
Bureau of Entomology in the U. S. Dept. of Agri 
culture, is Secretary of this association. 

'96.— S. W. Fletcher has been elected director of 
the Experiment Station of Virginia and has resigned 
his position as Professor of Horticulture in the 
Michigan Agricultural College. 



'96. "The Brown Owl." an excellent little 

annual published by the senior class of the English 
high school of Providence, R. I., is dedicated to 
Frederick H. Read, a teacher in that school. 

'98. — Julian S- Eaton was married Oct. 19. 1907, 
to Miss Ethelwynne Wyrran of Minneapolis, Minn., 
and since that time has been travelling extensively in 
Europe with Mrs. Eaton. On their return to this 
country in the near future they will reside at Hartford, 
Conn., where Mr. Eaton has accepted the position of 
Chief Adjuster of the Life and Accident departments 
of the Travelers' Insurance Co. of that city. 

'99. Daniel A. Beaman, teacher of Horticulture 

and Entomology, Ponce Agricultural School, Ponce, 
Porto Rico was married on Dec. 29, to Miss Cora 
E. Brill at Rio Piedras. P. R. 

•99. The Bureau of Entomology of the U. S. 

Dept. of Agriculture has recently issued an elaborate 
bulletin prepared by W. E. Hinds, entitled "Some 
Factors in the Natural Control of the Mexican Cotton 
Boll Weevil. " Mr. Hinds is Professor of Entomology 
and Entomologist of the Alabama Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Auburn, Alabama and is the author of various 
works on the Boll Weevil. 



'00.— J. E. Halligan. Chemist at the Louisiana 
Experiment Station has been intimately connected 
with the preparation of an elaborate fertilizer bulletin 
recently published at that station. The bulletin con 
tains analyses of 4375 samples of complete fertilizers, 
acid phosphates, bone meals, tankage. Paris green 
and other materials. 

'01.— Wm. C. Dickerman. Insurance business. 
55 High St., Pawtucket, R. I., residence 249 East 
Ave.. Pawtucket. R. I. 

'04.— R. A. Quigley, a student at the Harvard 
Medical Scoool was the recent recipient of a fellow- 
ship granted by the Faculty of Medicine of Harvard 
University. 

'05.— Fred L. Yeaw, Assistant in Plant Pathology 
at the California Experiment Station, was married 
Sept. 19. 1907, at Vacaville, Cal., to Miss Nita 
May Hanson of Sat Jose. Cal. 

'05 —Miss Esther C. Cushman. Teacher of Biol- 
ogy in the Beverly High School. 

Among recent visitors were George E. O'Hearn, 
'04, J. W. Kellogg, '00, A. D. Taylor, P. F. Wil- 
liams, J. F. Lyman of the class of 1905. 



THKRK a'*' many tttyle-surpriscs awaiting you in Our Stock of 
Hwagger Winter Clothes for Men and Young Men. For this month esptc- 
ially we're showing some beautiful pattensn iS uits a ndrOvercoats and 
th.» smart styliug, aigh quality and Low Tricing should tempt you to conn- 
in and see them. 

OUR great strength lies in our capacity for giving mod value for the 

money. 

True, we eclipse others in the freshness of our offering*, in tin ir 
high-grade quality, and in the excellence of our service, but we know 
that our patrons recognize us primarily as "the givers of good value." 
Not a bad sort of reputation, either, we think. 

CUT OUT THI8 AD., bring it with you and we will allow you 10% 
discount from price of goods purchased. 

toi<JC G&1& SH8P 

•AlWa^s Welcome-bJy or i)ot 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



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the: 
DAIRY EHPLOYnENT AGENCY 

LANSINCi, MICHIGAN 
KINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



short course: men 

I place buttermakerrs, chteseiu.ikei s. managers, 
herdsmen, eti 
Write for blanks and terms. 

K. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying,Cleaning, Pressing and Repairing. 



It's Your Next at the 



Mercl House BarDer Shop 



Four First Class Barbers 



< >|)en Mondays from 
Tuesdays 
Wednesdays, 
Thursdays, 
Fridays, 
Saturdays, 



a. m. to .S I'. M. 

" 6 " 

8 " 

6 '• 
8 " 
li 



A II onler* promptly iitteinleil to. 

Drop tut- a postal Hint I will call M you. 

Hf-Kull Dies.. suii> to rent. St) SlllllailU' « lot he* boagbl 

11 Amity Street, Amiikkst, Ma^. 

GOODS FOR MEN 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the plate to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets. Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, ( 'omfortables and Towels. 



C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
from LONDON. 

CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMIIKK>'l. MAss 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 



Fancy Crackers, 



Confectionery and Fruit, 



RaDar's 3mi, 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



Old South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvement**, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hatnp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY 

R. J. RAHAR. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 

It is a Natural Manure. 

i.roirs Stromj. Viijurnits.lliiiltliij Plant! llmt BwM />'>'<(» 
l>R. QKOBttl K. STONE ProtoMoi • •( Boteai ;ii the Mm.» 

\ i_'i IrlllUlllil Colle kc, :ilnl PrOfoSBOr Ol Plant l>l-tn-e» it Hit 

Hutch Kxperlmeot fetation, Amherst, Mu-^ . writs* to om 

Agricultural Expert M follows 

'• I will say t li nt I connliler t li •■ formula which you 
prepared (or Mr. Preacott and applied by bin on bis 
betia »an very effectual in controlling the aaparana 
ni-t. Tlir application Of your formula ami other frit 
lores which were oarrled oat la the management of 
tht-ne bods convince mo that n oonatltatetl the iie-t 
ileiiiou tiHlion of tlif control of asiiaritgU!- ni-l which 
haw ever been maile in Ibis eountrv ." 
i.KNl'INK I'KRI'VIAN QUAFO formeil the basi* Of I he 
■ DOT* mentioned formula. It wan n.weilon the a»parin:ii- i>eil» 
■ r i . \v. Pbmcott., Concord. Naaa., tbe larjfext Individual 
[rower Of A«parH|fii* In New KiikIhihI We al»<> offer 

WK ALSO OKU i: 

Nitrate of Soda. Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 



\n . iii-trlbute fertilizing material!, from New York, loatoa, 
III-., ami Charleston. 8. C 

our henutlfullv llluatratcd 80 page book on " Plant Kooil 

%rge. 



11 v llluatratcd 80 page hook on " PI 
Problems," is sent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Mile Importer* for I'. S. of (Jenul ne l'eru\iMii tiuano. anil 
Ma n ii fact ii re ra of High (Irade rertlllier*. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 




In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important tliat you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so \yhy not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Hall, Foot 
Hall, basket ball, 
RunningShoes, Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat 
ers. Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
our trademark means something. 
>en<l tor our Catalogue It ia freetoany BfkllW 

WRIGHT am DITSON 




Cum m.i 



)44 WASHINGTON 
iv WES1 jam 51 
Pkovidi s< I K 



- I SOS! <>N 
NEW VOKK 
I. Camsridcb, Mass. 



44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



1 



HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Else. 



K. A. THOMPSON, 

Kear l"irst National Hank. AMIII.IO I 




CapsandGotcns 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and /foods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

•_'0i? Fourth Ave Niw FotK. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



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WOODWARD S LUNCH, 

■>: Mail! SI.. NoKTHAMPION. 

M;i-..iiir Klock, near Depot, open every day. 

I.utnhe*, ionfectionery, Cltfar* Noted for it» eicellent 

oyster Stew an<l <:iam Chowdei . 

Closed only (row 1 a. m to 4 a m. 



W. W. BOTNTON, 

MANUKACTUKEE OF 

SODA WATEK8, 

Pineapple, Leuion and German Tonic, Birch Beer and (.inger 
Ale. fountain* eharged to order 



KlVEE STKKET, 



SOKTHAMrTON, Mill. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabric* for the spring and summer 
trade of "07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladies 
Garments iu a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Preying promptly done 

kf- Military Work a Specialty .^0| 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkr»t, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Upto- Date. 



OUR 1GE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



Special Attention given to Atbletic Teams, Frater- 
nity ami Alumni Banquets. 

BKST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

1). H. KENDRWK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

M«A.Oi A««*. H.M.JBNWmON.'ON 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

fjarSATISFAOTIOK OUARANTBBD.* 
H. A. VTLBT, Btaumgrr. 
Office 

East Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE 



Th« Children are Happy. 

Because their clothes are ma<le on the New Home Sewim 
Machine, which fact, aasores them of no "rips." Mother- 
should get one at once as It will <lo for their children In yearn 
to com*. Healers Everywhere. 



Kllswortl. I. Brown, iU).s.WWllWWW«WtttlWI|Bl. 

a w II h «s I 1H t'l SION. 



DEHTAL ROOMS. 

CITIKK'S HUM K, AMIIMtsT, MASS 

DENTALi ROOMS, 

HTI.KK'S IIMMK. AMHKKST. MASS 



AMHKHHl ItiVIHKH*. 

i are Will leave A inherit and Northampton on the hour and 

bait boar front SW AH. till io.:ioi». m. Sundays the first ear 

will leuxe itt !>.:«> A. M. 

Main ukuik. Okkenkiei.o, Mass 

John A.TaKKart, Supt. 
SOUTHAMPTON OFFICE, 108 MAIN ST 

i W. Clapp, Aa»t. supt Telephone, Northampton, lift rl. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

IU -«v. your sole. ( onietuine for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

KepnlrtiiK a »peelalt> . 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Orrotm town iiai ■ 

E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 

.HUA-.25™ K - OOM ^.., K ... «,»- lAmherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 

inniK Mocks 

» TO IS A.. US.., 1-30 TO 6 P. IvI. 



Kilter and Nitrous Oxide (las administered when desired. 



TH URBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Psot Offka, 



AMHERST MASS 



Are you in need of a 



Drei 



JSlairt v 



We liavc a few tliat we arc < losing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 

AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER 



SELLS 



<;ooi> coal 



AT RIGHT PRICES. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at If and &i 
minutes pant each hour until i.M v. m., and Holyokc 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.80 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRlCH.Siipt. 



Teleplione 71-2 Amherst. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



OOMUECTBD TO JAM, I, l«w* 

SOUTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting it Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., It. 10 p. M., 
express, and o.4S p. m. The S.4J p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Noiwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Hrattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 1 2 . a 7 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

.). \Y. HANLKY, 
Oeoermi Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







FOR CHRISTMAS 

To take home or to send to friends nothing 
is better than a good Totted Plant Kern, I'alm or 

Begonia. 

See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 

ARTHUK K. DORK. L H TOIKTKI.OTTK. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

nOUUU lltALBKB AND .IOHUKKM IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Comer North and I'nionSts., Basement 8 Union St., 

BOSTON. 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



^chillares 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



143 Main Stri-et, 



NORTHAMPTON, MAM8. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 



Tel. 888-2. 




TDK I.AIUiKST OOLLSOI KNUHAV- 
INO HOt'SK IN TIIK WORLD. 

Works: 11th Streets Lehigh Ave. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

l UH t t H by Merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STARLES 

( MASKS. BAKU, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE, 

telephone Connection. AEHERST, MASS 



,1. H.TROT1 



rrvn 



PLUH1BER. STEflPl 4 BBS FITTER, 

UNO DERLER IN STOVES AND RRNGES. 



Shop i; 1-2 North PlBASAMI S i 



Telephone 36-1?. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Lett .it Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE>ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE I INK OK UOODS 
MTTED TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All gooiis Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prim. 



EL. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix How, 



Amhkkst, Mass, 



LET 



"BILL 1 

PRESS FOR YOU. 

Oeanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for Si. 50. 



J. A. 
PLEASANT ST., 



URNER. 

11VKR AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FL'LL LINK OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 



KSTAK!.1SHKI> ISS1. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

M6.il] Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

1MPOKTKBS am MAKl'tAI-TUKKKK <H 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS - 

We liHinlle the l>»-st of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath 11.00, $1.50 and 
12.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKKR & CO. 



CAKKNTtt & AVtfHOUSt, 



AflWKSf , ftA$$. 



£!■■ C THE > *3 ' 

Massachusetts 
HQvicultural 

Golleae 



A.M» 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. 



SHORT COURSES as follow* 



( a) A 9MM Wihtkr COON m Dairy Fakm.n... Open to persons of both «» 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnisl, c rtiticates of go... 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the I mu-d 
States. Begins Hist Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Shout CotJttH in Bkk (Ymtkk. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May an<l 



I A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
Admission -ranted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
ftmUes during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses „ 
a lowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
acape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three course, 
cutely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany. 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, Kngl.sh, trench, Cer 
man. Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 
Necessary expenses do not exceed <250 per annum. 

. . • , t Kenton L. Bittkkmku*. Amherst, Mass. 

For further information . ^ "" 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL.. 18 



NO. 8 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 29. 190S 






We would like a share of your patronage, we arc reliable and well known. 
All the boys gel the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 







/;. /;. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fuu Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 

OCCUL1ST8 PRESCRIPTIONS PILLED. 

GO TO .... 

Page's Sboe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines. as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company. 

must 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses 




Deuefs Drug Store. 



W '. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Bmx k, 



IMHERST. 



the: college signal 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JANUARY 29. 1908 



NO. 8 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Ahimni are requested te contribute. Cemmunications should be addressed. CouLioe Signal. Ammbr&t. Mass. Thi Sional will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not recede their paper regulariy are requested to 
notify tha Business Manager. ^_ 

BOARD OP IDIT0K8. 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK, 1 008. Business Manager 

H. L. WHITE. 1909, Assistant Ed'tor. 

O. B. BRICCS. 1909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. W. E. ADAMS. 1909. Alumni Notes 

J. R. PARKER. 1908. Athletics. E. F. DAMON. 1910 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908. College Notes. W. R. CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 



ftl.OO per tear ia adtaace. Siagle Capias). 10c. 



al l a.ted 



aad Caaada. 



Athletic Association 
Foot- Ball Aaaociatior. 
Basket-ball Asaoriaton 
Base Bail Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sac. Fraternity Conference 

M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jenniaon. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman. Manage) • 
College Senate. 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indei 
Y. M. C- A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. CiUett. President 



J. R.Parker . Pras. 
R.D. Lul'. Manager 
C. H. Whtte. Pras. 
H. M Jenniaon. Manager. 



Entered as second -claaa matter. Peat Office at Amherst. 
tt%n%i%« \ «%«\«%»%v Saansaa. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



An incident has occurred on the college grounds 
which had hitherto been thought impossible. We 
refer to the wanton shooting of a tame grey- squirrel 
on the plot of ground In front of Professor Has- 
brouck's house. The squirrel was one of many 
which have long been pets of the Hasbrouck family, 
and which at the time of shooting was fearlessly feed- 
ing upon nuts furnished by its human friends. The 
act was a cowardly one, and is more disgusting in 
that it was performed by an upper classman, who by 
this time might presumably be expected to be 
acquainted with the code of ethics which protects 
these many little semi-tame inhabitants of our college 
grounds. It is with difficulty that we can conceive of 
the trend of thought in an educated man's mind which 
would lead to such a contemptible act. 



The editor wishes to again call attention to Signal 
competition. Two sophomores and one freshman 



responded to the last call. At Signal election in 
March one junior, two sophomores and two freshmen 
will be elected to the board. It Is a matter of class 
and college loyalty for each class to be represented on 
the staff of the college paper by its best men. The 
Signal has too often been forced to take second or 
third rate men because first rate men are too lazy to 
do the work. The requirements for qualification are 
almost absurdly easy, and yet men seem to hesitate 
about undertaking the slight work involved. These 
requirements were published in No. 6 of the present 
volume. The editor will be be glad to furnish any 
further information or explanations personally. Get 
busy. SOMEONE. 



One further explanation on this early breakfast bus- 
iness, and we are done with it. The explanation has 
been volunteered that what we have spoken of as 
"rulings" were not intended to be taken as such, and 
that the college authorities were far from wishing to 
give the impression that there is any compulsion In 
any phase of the matter. It was the intention to 






; 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



merely call the attention of the students to the neces- 
sity of leaving the dining-hall at an early enough season 
in the morning in order to allow the waiters plenty of 
time to finish their work and present themselves at 
chapel services. So much in justice to the intentions 
of the college authorities. In justice to the student 
body it may be said that a simple request to that 
effect would have been appreciated as fair and just, 
and would have been complied with in spirit as well 
as in letter. The matter is understood at last, and 
presents no further misunderstandings and ill-will. 



Athletic Notts- 



The visiting team was greatly handicapped by a very 
slippery floor and the absence of any boundary lines. 
Once or twice during the game M. A. C. showed 
flashes of form but in the main their passing was 
poor and inaccurate. Every man on the Gardner 
team got at least two baskets. 
The line-up : 



GARDNER. 

Moore. I. f. 
Greenwood, r. i. 
J. Dickerman, c. 
Farnum, I. g. 
D. Dickerman. r. g. 

The score— Gardner 44. M. A. C. II. 



M. A. C 

r. g.. Neale 

I. g.. Regan 

c. Daniels 

r f . Shattuck 

I. f.. Burke 

Goals from floor— 



BASKETBALL. 

The basketball team has taken a decided brace 
under the able captaincy of Burke, who has been 
acting as captain in the absence of Gillett. Burke, 
who has been working hard throughout the season, 
has shown even more determination during the past 
two weeks, and has kept his men working in a way 
which promises soon to develop a winning team. 
Neale has been developing remarkably at guard .while 
Shattuck and Johnston, new men, are making the 
others hustle to hold down their positions. Daniels 
has been shifted from guard to center in Gillett 's 
place, and is playing a fine game. Cobb, in spite of 
a forced rest for a few days on account of a sore foot, 
is playing his usual brilliant game. Burke is always 
to be depended upon for aggressive and skilful work. 
Regan has been kept out of the game a week on 
account of the death of his mother, but will soon be 
in trim again in his usual good form. The game 
Jan. 17 with Cushing at Ashburnham was cancelled 
out of respect to Regan in his sudden loss. The 
game with Tufts proved a surprise, for Tufts has been 
playing a fine game, defeating Brown twice and the 
University of Vermont, two strong teams. The 
enthusiasm of the victory over Tufts stayed with the 
team the next night at Hanover, where it gave the 
veteran Dartmouth five a good run for the game. 
The games in the near future will be looked forward 
to with keen interest. 

Gardner. 44 ; M. A. C, II. 
The basketball team suffered a 44 to 1 1 defeat at 
the hands of the Gardner A. A. Jan. 17 at Gardner. 



Moore 6. Farnum 2. D. Dickerman 2. J. Dickerman 5. 
Greenwood 4. Burke 2. Shattuck 2. Daniels. Goals from 
fouls— J. Dickerman 6. Burke. Referee— J. G. Town. 
Timer— T. F. Rouke. Time— 20-minute halves. Attend- 
ance — 500. 

M. A. C. 16; TUFTS, 15. 
The Massachusetts Agricultural College basketball 
team defeated Tufts last Friday night at Amherst in 
one of the fastest and most exciting games ever seen 
in the drill hall, the final score standing 16 to 15. 
The outcome was always in doubt and not until the 
last blow of the whistle was M. A. C. sure of victory. 
Burke started the scoring for Massachusetts by a goal 
from the floor, and Seede scored first for Tufts on a 
goal from foul. Daniels then got a goal. Kimball 
and Seede then put Tufts in the lead by getting goals 
from the floor. Burke evened things up by caging 
the ball on a free try. Neale followed with another 
basket, hut Seede put Tufts again in the lead by 
scoring a floor goal and a goal on a free try. Just 
before the end of the half, Burke tied the score on a 
free try, the score standing 8 to 8 for the period. 

In the second half Tufts was weakened by the loss 
of Captain Seede, who sprained his ankle the first 
minute of the half. The playing for the first 10 
minutes was fast and furious, both sides covering so 
closely that neither was able to score. Burke again 
started scoring for Massachusetts by throwing a diffi- 
cult goal with his left hand while closely guarded. 
Getchel tied the score by caging the ball for Tufts. 
The M. A. C. team then showed a burst of speed, 
which, for a moment, swept the Tufts players off 
their feet and netted M. A. C. six points in two min- 
utes of play. Tufts then braced and by the hardest 



kind of playing managed to get within one point of 
ng the score before the game ended. Burke 
played a splendid game for Massachusetts, scoring 
eight points. Shattuck covered his man well and 
broke up many chancas. Seede excelled for Tufts. 
The line-up : — 

M. A. C. TUFTS. 

Burke. I. f. r - Z- Hatch 

Whitmarsh. Cobb, r f. I, g • Kimball 

Daniels, c. c., Atwood, Getchel 

Shattuck. I. g. r. f.. Seede. Knight 

Neale. 1. g.. '■ '■• Dickinson 

Score— M. A. C. 16. Tufts 15. Goals from floor— Burke 
3. Daniels 2. Neele 2. Soode 2. Hatch. Kimball. Knight, 
Getchel. Goals from fouls— Burke 2. Seede 2. Dickinson. 
Referee— Keith of Amherst College. Timer — Philbrick. 
Attendance— 300. 

Dartmouth, 34, M. A. C. 14. 
After beating Tufts in a hard game on Friday night 
the basketball team took a long journey to Hanover 
on Saturday and although beaten piayed a strong 
game against the Dartmouth five. The final score 
was 34 to 14 but the game was much closer than the 
score indicates. M. A. C. played a strong defensive 
game and held the forwards of Dartmouth to low 
scores. Strength rather than skill won for Dart- 
mouth. Numerous fouls were the order of the even- 
ing. Lang scored 16 points for the green while Cobb 
scored 9 for Massachusetts. 
The line-up 

DARTMOUTH. **■ *■ c - 

Burns, Avery, r. g. '• '•. Burke 

Schildmiller. I g. T. f.. Shattuck 

Lang, c. c • Daniels 

Brady. Hedges, I. f. r. g.. Cobb 

Morrissey. r. f. •• g • Neale 
Goals- Lang 8, Morrissey 4. Brady 2. Cobb. Shattuck 2. 

Goals from fouls— Cobb 7. Burke. Brady 4. Morrissey 2. 

Referee — Ailing. 

«. 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas it has pleased God in his infinite wisdom to take 
to himself Doctor Augustus Armagnac. our friend and in- 
lctor ; be it 

Resolved That we the students of the Massachusetts Agri- 

ultural College do extend to his bereaved family our sincere 

."npathy in this their hour of sorrow , and be it further 

Resolved That a copy of these resolutions be sent to his 

bereaved family and that a copy be published in the College 

Signal. 

Thomas A. Barry. ") 

S. S. Crossman. j For , he Studems . 



Colleg? N°**S- 



W. E. Leonard. \ 

E. C. Whittaker J 



Prof. George F. Mills has been elected a trustee of 
the Amherst Savings Bank. 

Rev. Willis H. Butler of Northampton conducted 
the vesper services Jan. 26. 

The vesper services Jan. 19 were conducted by 
Rev. Arthur A. Coar of Springfield. 

The Y. M. C. A. Jan. 23 was addressed by Sec- 
retary Willis of the Worcester association. 

P. A. Russell of Great Barrington recently resigned 
from the board of trustees and W. W. Rawson of 
Arlington has been appointed by the governor to take 
his place. 

Mr. Canning superintendent of the Smith College 
Botanic Museum, gave a very interesting talk on the 
decoration of home grounds before the Horticultura' 
seminar Friday Jan. 24. 

The college herd has been recently subjected to 
the tuberculin test. This is a preparatory measure 
toward putting up certified milk, which will be shipped 
to D. Whitney & Sons, Boston. 

The Short Course this winter has thirty-three mem- 
bers. Mr. Hunting is in charge of the separating 
room. Mr. Parsons of North Amherst has charge 
of the Babcock test, and Langwill, a senior at Iowa 
State College is in charge of the butter making. 

President Butterfield delivered an address Jan. 17 
at Trenton, N. J., before the New Jersey board of 
agriculture. He went then to the University of West 
Virginia where he gave a short series of lectures on 
different phases of rural life. 

Grand Master Richardson of the state grange, 
together with his state deputies, met at Clark Hall 
Monday night, Jan. 20, and discussed phases of grange 
work. A large delegation stayed over night and 
spent a good part of the next day inspecting the various 
departments ot the college. 

Prof. E. A. White lectured Jan. 13 to members of 
the Men's Club of Edwards church, Northampton, 
and on Jan. 28 to the Woman's Club of New Brit- 
ain, Conn., his subject being "Ornamental Gardens 
and Garden Materials." Professor White also has a 
date Feb. 10, with the Holland Club of Belchertown. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Burse, ' 1 1, has been obliged to leave college on 
account of concussion of the brain due to an accident 
received during Christmas vacation. He is in a crit- 
ical condition. 

A new magazine entitled The Journal of Econo- 
mic Entomology is to be issued. The editor is E. P. 
Felt of Albany, N. Y. Dr. H. T. Fernald's name 
appears on the advisory board. 

The announcement of the third session of the Grad- 
uate School of Agriculture is out. This school is 
maintained under the auspices of the Association of 
American Agricultural Colleges and Experiment Sta- 
tions. The sessions this year wiil be held at Cornell 
University July 6-31. Other topics treated will be 
biochemistry, agronomy, horticulture, dairy husbandry, 
poultry, veterinary medicine and entomology. Pro- 
fessor Waugh's name appears in the faculty list, as 
does the name of Dr. E. P. Felt, '91. The school 
will offer a splendid opportunity for graduates who 
wish to take a short course of advanced work. 

An organ recital was given at the Assembly period 
Wednesday, Jan. 22. The following program was 
included. 
Prelude and Fugue. 



STATEMENT 



LEGISLATIVE 



Mr. Parsons. 



Nocturne. 



J. S. Bach. 

Frederick Chopin, 
(Arr. by Lemare) 



Alexis Hollaender. 
Edwin H. Lemare 



Miss Knowles. 

Pianoforte Solo-Marsch. 

Mr. Bartlett. 

Andantino in D-flat. 

Miss Knowles. 

• Pilgrims' Chorus " from • Tannhaeuser 

Richard Wagner. 
Miss Knowles. 

Albert D. Taylor, 05, now instructor in landscape 

gardening at Cornell University, gave an illustrated 

lecture, Tuesday night. Jan. 21. under the auspices 

of the Stockbridge club, taking for his subject "A 

Summer Trip on the Continent. " Mr. Taylor spent 

all last summer traveling in England, Ireland, France. 

Switzerland, Germany and Holland. He secured 

many excellent views and the set of slides shown was 

one of the best ever seen at Wilder hall. His lecture 

proved to be entertaining and instructive and was 

enjoyed by a good-sized audience. Mr. Taylor 

lectured twice the following day to student classes. 

once to the senior class in landscape gardening, and 

once to the junior class in arboriculture. 



REGARDING 
BUDGET. 

The Finance Committee of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College at a recent meeting in Amherst 
made up the Legislative budget which will be pre- 
sented at this session of the Legislature. It is made 
up of three parts. The college will ask for a defi- 
ciency appropriation aggregating about $16,500. 
The main item in this deficiency is a deficit in cur- 
rent funds which has been accumulating during a 
number of years. Last year the college would have 
paid all of its expenses if it had not been for the poor 
fruit crop, and for the loss caused by the restriction 
of sales by the greenhouse particularly, and from the 
working of the eight-hour day. The income for col- 
lege purposes during the past eight years has in- 
creased only about twenty-five per cent, whereas fou r 
or five new buildings have been added and must be 
maintained and otherwise supported, and the attend- 
ance of students has practically doubled. 

An increase of $23,000 will be asked in the current 
annual appropriation. $2,000 of this is to cover the 
regular maintenance of the different departments 
This year the Finance Committee apportioned the 
funds of the institution by items and in detail to the 
different departments. Each department is expected 
not to exceed that apportionment. The Committee 
found that it would take $2,000 more per year to 
meet the maintenance needs of the different depart- 
ments. $3,000 will be asked to cover necessary 
increases in the teaching force. $8,000 will be 
asked to cover the winter and summer short courses, 
and the new Grange correspondence courses. 

$7 1,700 will be asked as a special appropriation 
for this year, and is made up of the following items : 



1. Target range and equipment, $1,000 

2. Repairing and refitting Experiment Station 

buildings, 4-,000 

3. Addition to electric light plant, 6,000 

4. Repairing and refitting North College, 6.000 

5. Enlargement and improvement of Library 

facilities. 2.500 

6. Department equipment, 8,000 

7. Repairs and minor improvements. 7.700 

8. Fruit storage house, 2,500 

9. Glass houses and attached teaching building 

and equipment. 34,000 



INFORMAL DANCE. 

The third Informal Dance of the year was held 
Ian. 18 in the Drill-hall. The dance was particularly 
well attended, some indefinable force, whether excep- 
tionally favorable weather, the romantic influence of a 
full moon, or a surge of sentiment through masculine 
hearts, seeming to draw the couples toward the Drill- 
hall. Th^ reception began at about four o'clock, 
and dancing followed soon after— a littie earlier than 
usual, allowing time during the program for a few 
•xtra numbers. Mrs. Rowe catered at Draper Hall 
during intermission, after which dancing was again 
in order until about nine o'clock. Derrick's West- 
field orchestra furnished the music, which was of an 
exceptionally good quality. 

The freshmen and their pseudo friends, members 
of the short-course, under the guidance of several 
capable sophomores, deserve great credit for the attrac- 
tive manner in which they cleaned and decorated the 
Drill-hall for the occasion. A promenade was 
curtained off at the north end of the hall by 
hanging a huge American flag, furnished by the 
Military Department, from the rafters. The platform 
f >r the orchestra was placed in the center of the floor ; 
a corner at the south end was reserved for the patron- 
esses. The walls and balcony-rail were covered with 
sprays of hemlock as a background for a goodly dis- 
play of college banners. Hemlock trees and boughs 
were made good use of to break up the monotony of 
the floor boundaries, as well as foliage plants from the 
plant-houses. The patronesses and chaperons of the 
evening were Mrs. Waugh. Mrs. Ostrander and Mrs. 
Brooks of Amherst, Miss Heine of Smith, Miss 
Reeves of Mt. Holyoke. 

About seventy couples attended the dance. Those 
present: Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck, P. H. Smith, G. 
N. Willis, L. S. Walker, G. H. Chapman, E. G. 
Bartlett, A. J. Anderson, H. C. Chase, O. L. Clark. 
W. J. Coleman, John Daniel, S. L. Davenport, 
P. M. Eastman, C. L. Flint. A. J. Farley, H. K. 
Hayes, R. H. Jackson, L. D. Larsen. D. P. Miller. 
E. D. Philbrick, T. L. Warner, A. L. Whiting, R. 
D. Whitmarsh, S. J. Wright, G. R. Cobb. T. F. 
Waugh, J. R. Parker, R. H. Verbeck, L. W. Chap- 
man, W. E. Adams, W. D. Barlow. P. P. Cardin, 
G. M. Codding, S. S. Crossman, A. W. Hubbard, 
H. G. Noble, John Noyes. M. W. Thompson, W. H. 



Turner, C.R. Webb, R. C. Potter. L. G. Willis. R. 
H. Allen, R. E. Annis, R. H. Armstrong, Louis 
Brandt, J. P. Blaney, H. A. Brooks, S. C. Brooks, 
L. S. Dickinson, M. S. Hazen, W. E. Leonard, F. 
D. McGrow, R. A. Waidron. R. S. Eddy, J. N 
Everson. W. C. Johnson, W. M. S. Titus, F. H. 
Partridge. R. S. Whitney. P. W. Allen, W. F. Hen 
nessy, G. P. Nickerson, C. A. Lodge, G. H. Grey, 
G. A. Tilton, J. A. Davey. 



ANNOUNCEMENT. 

To any who attended the Two- Years' Course at M. 
A. C. 

Dear Friends: — You probably remember receiving 
some time ago a circular letter calling your attention 
to a proposed consolidation as an alumni association 
of all the classes of the two-years' course at the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. Sufficient re- 
plies were received to ensure the success of the pro- 
ject. Accordingly, the committee plans to hold a 
reunion at M. A. C in |une, 1908, to effect an organ- 
ization and secure the co- operation of all who at- 
tended the short course. Under the new system of 
class reunions this will bring together those who were 
in college together as well as classmates. 

Replies from Ninety-five men and Ninety seven, 
as well as Ninety-six. indicate that we may expect a 
good attendance and harmonious endeavor. You 
are earnestly requested to come and bring your wife , 
and also to prevail upon any others of your class, 
graduates or not, to do the same. Further notice 
will be sent you giving exact time and place of meet- 
ing. The Secretary wants the address of every ex 
classmate. and if you know any such please forward 
his address to 

E. W. Capen, M. D., Monson, Mass. 



MUSICAL ASSOCIATION. 

At a recent joint meeting of the Musical Clubs of 
the college the following constitution was adopted : 

Article I. The name of this organization shall be 
the M. A. C. Musical Association. 

Art. II. The object of the M. A. C. Musical 
Association shall be to encourage, develop, manage 
and control all musical activities of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College. 

Art. Ml. Section 1. This association shall con- 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



sist of an orchestra, a glee club, a mandolin club 
and any other club which may be established to fur- 
ther the musical interests of the college. 

Sec. 2. The membership of this association 
shall consist of the members of the various clubs. 

Art. IV. Sec. I. The officers of this associa- 
tion shall consist of a President, Manager, Secretary 
and Treasurer, and a Librarian. 

Sec. 2. The Musical Committee of the Faculty 
shall constitute an advisory committee for this 
association. 

Sec. 3. The officers of the M. A. C. Musical 
Association and the Leaders of the separate clubs 
shall constitute the executive committee. 

Sec. 4. All officers of this association and lead- 
ers of the clubs shall be elected during the first week 
in June, to hold office for one college year beginning 
at the opening of the college year following their 
election. 

Sec. 5. The officers of the aforesaid association 
shall be elected by its members. 

Sec. 6. The leader of a club shall be chosen by 
its members, but shall be elected by the association. 
Art. V. Sec. 1. It shall be the duty of the 
President to call and preside at all meetings of the 
association and perform all other duties which may be 
devolved upon him. 

Sec. 3. It shall be the duty of the Secretary and 
Treasurer to keep a record of all meetings of the 
association and to have charge of its finances. 

Sec. 4. It shall be the duty of the Librarian to 
keep and stamp all the music in possession of this 
association. 

Art. VI. One third of all the members of the 
association shall constitute a quorum. 

Art. VII. No alteration or amendment to this 
constitution shall be adopted unless it has been con- 
sidered at some previous meeting. 

The following officers have been elected to serve 
for the remainder of the ensuing year : President, 
E. W. Bailey, '08; Manager, H. M. Jennison, '08; 
Secretary and Treasurer, William E. Adams, '09, 
Librarian, P. W. Allen, 'II. 

Donations to this association from alumni and 
friends interested in the musical affairs of M. A. C. 



will be gladly received and acknowledged by the 
Treasurer. 



THE MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches by F. H. Fowler '87. 

2. The Plant Grows. 
Joseph Breck, George Denny. Marshall P. Wilder 
and others petitioned the Legislature of 1845 asking 
for incorporation for the purpose of establishing and 
conducting an institute for practical instruction in the 
science of agriculture and horticulture. The result 
was 'An Act to incorporate the Massachusetts 
Academy of Agriculture," to be established in the 
town of Westborough, Worcester County, and with 
authorization to hold $75,000 of estate, to b; devoted 
to the purposes of education. Nothing came of this, 
however. 

Early in the winter of 1848 the Hampshire. Franc. 
lin and Hampden Agricultural Society (Northampton! 
and the Hampden Agricultural Society (Springfield i 
petitioned the legislature for the endowment of an 
institution in the Connecticut Valley, for instruction in 
the various departments of agricultural science. 
Representative Hubbard of Sunderland, on Jan. 29. 
1848, presented an order in the House of Representa 
fives, which provided that the committee on agricul- 
ture be instructed to inquire into the expediency of 
making provision for the establishment of a state 
agricultural school, or of providing for the mainten 
ance of an agricultural department in connection with 
one or more of the existing colleges of the Common- 
wealth. As a result Edward Hitchcock. William B. 
Calhoun, Samuel L. Hinckley, and others, were 
made a corporation by name of the "Massachusetts 
Agricultural Institute" (Acts of 1848, Chapter 242). 
which was authorized to hold $50,000 of real and per 
sonal estate "for the purpose of establishing, in some 
one of the towns lying on the banks of the Connecti 
cut river, or in a town immediately adjoining such 
towns, an agricultural school and experimental farm, 
the object of which shall be instruction in agricultural 
science, and improvements in all the arts connected 
with the practice of farming." It may be of interest 
to note that Mr. Hitchcock was president of Amherst 
College and Mr. Calhoun was secretary of the Com- 
monwealth at that time. 

President Hitchcock was greatly interested in the 



matter of agricultural education and was a member of 
the State Board of Agriculture in 1852 1856. Other 
Amherst College instructors interested in agriculture 
were Professors Charles U. Shepard, John A. Nash, 
William C. Fowler and William S. Clark, later presi- 
dent of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Pro- 
fessor ClarK taught cnemistry, botany, zoology and 
German. 

At a meeting of the trustees of Amherst college, 
Oct. 1 1. 1852, a "Preamble and Plan for a Scientific 
Department" was adopted. Statement was made 
that this department was to be entirely independent of 
the regular college course. In this plan, under head- 
ing "IV. Agriculture," it was stated that "The 
elements of agriculture will be taught theoretically 
and practically by the Rev. J. A. Nash." This 
"Scientific Department" appears to have been dis- 
continued after the academical year 1856-57. 

Governor George N. Briggs, in his inaugural 
address on Jan. 8, 1850. expressed his sympathy 
with agriculturists and commended the subject of agri- 
culture to the favorable consideration of the Legis- 
lature. Threa days later, in the Senate, so much of 
his address as related to agriculture was referred to 
the committee on Agriculture. Several memorials 
and petitions in behalf of agricultural education were 
presented and ref-rred to that committee, which on 
the 31st presented a full report signed by Jos. T. 
Buckingham, chairman, and five "Resolves concern- 
ing the Establishment of an agricultural school." 
These resolves passed their several stages, and were 
approved by Governor Briggs. They mark an epoch 
in the history of agricultural education in 
Massachusetts. 

The first of these resolves provided that the Gov- 
ernor be requested and empowered to appoint a board 
of five commissioners, who should consider the 
expediency of establishing agricultural schools or col- 
leges, and also of furnishing aid to any existing 
academy or college, for the instruction of such pupils 
as might wish to attend such an institution, in all 
those branches of agricultural knowledge necessary 
for the advancement of the interests of agriculture in 

the state. 

The second resolve directed the commissioners, if, 
in their opinion it was deemed expedient to establish 



such agricultural school or college, to procure plans 
and estimates for the buildings necessary for such an 
institution, and to propose and mature a system for 
the government thereof, with the requisite studies to 
be pursued at the same, and to ascertain what laws 
and regulations would be necessary and proper to put 
the same into successful operation. 

The report of the commissioners, making 105 
printed pages, was transmitted to the Legislature in 
January, 1851. and was signed by Marshall P. Wilder. 
Edward Hitchcock, Samuel A. Eliot, Thomas E. 
Payson and Eli Warren. It contained about 60 
printed pages concerning the agricultural institutions 
in Europe, with about 20 pages of "remarks upon the 
facts." by Commissioner Hitchcock. 

The commissioners recommended the appropriation 
of twenty thousand dollars, by the legislature, for the 
purpose of establishing a Central Agricultural College, 
with a Model and Experimental Farm ; said institu- 
tion to be open to all classes of the commonwealth, 
and in the government of which the state should be 
interested so far as might be deemed expedient. 
This report was referred to the Committee on Agri- 
culture, but no legislative action resulted. 

There assembled in the Green Room at the State 
House in Boston, on March 20. 1851, a convention 
of delegates from the various agricultural societies of 
the Commonwealth. The object was to concert 
measures for their mutual advantage, and for the pro- 
motion of the cause of agricultural education. Presi- 
dent Marshall P. Wilder of the Norfolk Agricultural 
Society was the leader in this movement. This con- 
vention, being a representative body, no doubt 
reflected the views of many, perhaps most, of the 
farmers of the Commonwealth, and its action in 
adopting resolutions strongly endorsing the establish 
ment and maintenance of agricultural schools shows 
that the seed sown had taken strong root and that 
early fruit might be expected. 

This convention also endorsed the plans for an agn- 
cultral school, already referred to, as worthy the pro- 
found consideration of the people of Massachusetts, 
and their representatives in the General Court, as 
indicating the feasibility and practicability of an estab- 
lishment worthy that exalted character which the 
state had secured by the endowment of kindred insti 






) 



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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



tutions, designed, like these, for the diffusion of use- 
ful knowledge among the people. 

3. The College in Sight. 
On Sept. 3, 1851. the Massachusetts Board of 
Agriculture, an association composed of delegates 
from each of the incorporated agricultural societies, 
convened at the State House in Boston. At this con- 
vention a committee was chosen to report on the sub- 
ject of agricultural education, and the best measures 
to be adopted for the encouragement of such educa- 
tion. This subject was considered at subsequent 
meetings of the Board in January and February fol- 
lowing, and at the latter meeting a memorial was 
adopted for presentation to the Legislature. This 
memorial closed with the following expression of 
opinion: — "It may only be observed that provision 
for instruction by lectures, and the use of the best 
text-books on the one hand, and for practice in an 
experimental farm on the other, seem to be the two 
great features of an institution for agricultural 
education." 

At a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture, 
held Jan. 19. 1856, a committee previously appointed 
to consider and report to the Board what further 
measures, if any. were needed to subserve the cause 
of agriculture in the Commonwealth, made report. 
In this report the committee expressed the opinion 
that nothing would be better calculated to advance 
the cause of agriculture and foster and direct the 
growing interest therein throughout the community at 
large, than the immediate establishment of an experi- 
mental farm, and as soon as the funds should permit. 
of an agricultural school in connection therewith, 
where both the science and the practice of farming 
might be taught in all their departments. Recom- 
mendation was made that a committee be chosen to 
apply to the L egislature for an act authorizing the 
formation of a board of trustees, capable of holding 
funds to be applied in establishing an experimental 
farm and agricultural school connected with it, 
designed to furnish instruction in every branch of rural 
economy, theoretical and practical. As a result of 
this action the Legislature incorporated the Massa- 
chusetts School of Agriculture. (Acts of 1856. 
chapter 236.) 

By this act, Marshall P. Wilder and certain others, 
and their associates and successors, were made a 



corporation, for the purpose of "holding, maintaining 
and conducting an experimental farm and school 
thereupon, with all needful buildings, library, apparatus 
and appurtenances, for the promotion of agricultural 
and horticultural art within this Commonwealth." 

Concerning this movement Mr. Wilder, in an his- 
torical address delivered at the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College on the occasion of graduating its first 
class, July 19, 1871, said:— 

"This plan seemed to accord better with the phase 
of public sentiment, and efforts were in progress for 
the establishment of such a school, which promised 
to be successful. A liberal proposal had been received 
from the heirs of William H. Cary, at Lexington, for 
the establishment of it in that town, ar.other from the 
city of Springfield, where nearly forty thousand dollars 
had been subscribed, and an offer of the town farm 
and buildings had been made by the city on condition 
of locating the school there. In their report of April. 
1861, the Trustees state that they have been induced 
to locate the school in Springfield, and expressed the 
hope that they might, at no distant day. lay the foun- 
dation of the Massachusetts School of Agriculture, as 
one of the permanent institutions of the state." 

In 1860 the charter of this school was transferred 
to several enterprising citizens of Springfield, who 
determined to raise by subscription $75, (XX) for the 
opening of the school In that city, relying upon the 
legislature for a further endowment. This project 
would probably have succeeded, had not the call to 
arms absorbed public attention. 

It appears that a printed petition was prepared and 
circulated for signatures, the wording of the petition 
being as follows: — 

"Your petitioners. citizens of Massachusetts, respect- 
fully represent that a college, for the purpose of more 
full and perfect instruction in the science and practice 
of agriculture and kindred branches, is much needed 
in this Commonwealth. 

That the establishment and endowment of such an 
institution has been repeatedly recommended by the 
State Board of Agriculture, and by all classes of per 
sons, in many different ways. 

That an effort is now making in Springfield and 
vicinity, with very flattering success, to raise at least 
$50,000, for the purpose of laying the foundation of 
such an institution. 



That a location in that city or vicinity is peculiarly 
favorable for such an institution, being central, easily 
accessible ar.d affording land of the best quality and 
greatest variety, at a moderate price. 

We. therefore, respectifully petition your Honora- 
ble Body to encourage the enterprise, by donating 
from the funds of the Commonwealth, a sum equal in 
amount to that named above, on such terms and 
conditions as may seem to your Honorable Body to 
be proper." 

Petitions were presented to the legislature of 1861 
: igned by citizens of several cities and towns in the 
Commonwealth and by representatives of agricultural 
organizations. A petition signed by citizens of North- 
ampton asked for its location in that town and called 
attention to tne provisions of the will of Oliver Smith. 
A petition was also presented calling attention to 
Powers Institute in Bernardston. and asking for a 
grant of $10,000. the income of wnich should for ever 
be used to support a professor of agriculture in that 
institution. 

Early in the session of that year (1861) Mr. 
Calhoun of Springfield was instrumental in getting the 
House of Reoresentatives to adopt an order instructing 
the Committee on Education to consider and report 
upon this matter, which committee reported a resolve 
(Senate No. 165) in favor of the establishment of an 
agricultural school or college, accompanied by a 
report. 

The result of all this action was the enactment of 
chapter 98 of the Resolves of 1861, which authorized 
the governor to appoint three commissioners, whose 
duty it should be to prepare a plan for the establish- 
ment of an agricultural school or college, and report 
the same to the next legislature. These commission- 
ers were to receive no pay for their services, but 
their expenses. Including the cost of the required plan 
not to exceed two hundred dollars, were to be paid 
from the treasury of the Commonwealth. 

This commission was constituted June 12, 1861, 
by the appointment of Rejoice Newton of Worcester, 
Thomas F. Plunkett of Pittsfield and Charles G. 
Davis of Plymouth. An order for considering the 
abolishing of this commission was introduced in the 
legislature of 1862, but extension of one year was 
granted. 

Judge Davis, in an address in 1888, said of the 



doings of this commission :-"We were advised not 
to report at once. Mr. Morrill's bill would be again 
offered under Mr. Lincoln, and if it passed, the mind 
of the legislature would be forced to entertain the sub- 
ject, and make full inquiry." 

On Feb. 18. 1859, a meeting of about forty indi- 
viduals representing associations of agriculture, horti- 
culture, art. science, and various industrial, educa- 
tional, and moral interests of the state, was held in 
the library of the Boston Society of Natural History, 
in Boston. A committee was appointed to memorial- 
ize the legislature, and did so in March, 1859, The 
result of this movemeht was "An Act to incorporate 
the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and grant 
aid to said Institute and to the Boston Society of 
Natural History. (Acts of 1861, Chapter 183). 
By this action a body corporate by the name of the 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology was created, 
"for the purpose of instituting and maintaining a 
society of arts, a museum of arts, and a school of 
industrial science, and aiding generally by suitable 
means, the advancement, development and practical 
application of science in connection with arts, agri- 
culture, manufactures and commerce." 



FOREST CONDITIONS. 

Since 1880 the sources of lumber supply have un- 
dergone remarkable changes. The first change was 
in the regions from which the principal kinds of lumber 
were procured, and this was followed by the substitu- 
tion of other kinds of wood in their places. Neither 
the centers of the lumber industry nor the leading 
classes of woods are the same as they were twenty- 
five years ago. In 1880 nine States — Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, New York, Texas, Arkan- 
sas, Mississippi, Louisiana, and Washington — pro- 
duced 52.8 per cent, or more than half of the total 
lumber production of the United States. In 1906 
these states produced 5 1 .05 per cent., practically the 
same proportion, but the changes which have taken 
taken place in the output of individual States are very 
striking. Michigan, for instance, cut 33 per cent, of 
the total in 1880 and but 5.6 per cent, in 1906; 
Louisiana cut 0.7 per cent, of the total in 1880 and 
7.5 per cent, in 1906; Washington furnished but 0.9 
per cent, of the lumber production of I860 and 1 1.5 
per cent, of that of 1906. The cutting out of the 



f 



IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 



virgin timber in the North and East has been followed 
by increased drains upon the forest resources of the 
South and West. 

Despite these conditions the amount or timoer re- 
quired has increased year by year. The increase in 
consumption of timber since 1880 has be^n more 
rapid than the increase of the population, and greater 
than in any similar period in the history of the country. 
This shows in a striking manner how much the nation 
depends upon forest products, and indicates how 
greatly all interests must suffer as lumber becomes 
scarcer and dearer. 

Statistics gathered by the Bureau of the Census 
and the Forest Service show that the quantities of 
timber used last year for lumber, shingles, ties, pulp- 
wood, cooperage stock, mine timbers, lath, distilla- 
tion, veneer, poles, tanning, and turpentine and rosin, 
expressed in board feet, reach a total of approximately 
50 billion board feet. 

While these drains upon the forest are known with 
reasonable certainty, there are others of which there 
is no record. These are the demand for posts, fuel, 
and domestic purposes, regarding which it is more 
dfficult to obtain information, because the products 
often pass through no market, but are consumed on 
the farm where they were produced. Careful esti- 
mates, however, place the total of wood used for fuel 
alone at an equivalent of 50 billion board feet a year. 
It will be seen, then, that the present consumption 
of wood in all forms is above 100 billion board feet 
annually. Estimating the forest area of the United 
States at from 500 to 700 million acres, and the 
annual growth at 60 board feet per acre, the yearly 
increase is form 30 to 42 billion feet. At this rate, 
the annual growth barely equals the amount consumed 
for lumber alone. Considering all the drains, the 
annual consumption of wood is probably three times the 
annual growth. Detailed estimates of standing tim- 
ber range frem 1,400 to 2,000 billion feet. Using 
the larger figure, and considering the annual growth of 
40 billion feet, it appears that there is not more than 
a thirty-three years' supply of timber in this country 
at the present rate of consumption. 

At present only about 22 per cent, of our total 
forest area is in State or National Forests, the 
remainder being unreserved public lands or in private 
hands. The forest area is amply sufficient, if rightly 



managed, to produce eventually enough timber to 
supply all our needs. Yet private owners, as well as 
the State and National Governments, must use 
their forest lands in a right way if we are to maintain 
our timber supply. 

Circular 129, just issued by the Forest Service, 
contains a discussion of the drains upon the forests 
and the sources and the duration of the timber sup- 
ply. This publication will be sent free upon appli- 
cation to the Forester, U. S. Department of Agricul 
ture, Washington, D. C. —Press Review. 

D?p&rtmfrvf ^lot*s. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

DIVISION OF PLANT AND ANIMAL CHEMISTRY. 

This department is experimenting at the Hatch 
Barn with the so-called Santee system of ventilation 
which consists in opening the windows and covering 
the same with screens made of muslin or cheese 
cloth. The cloth keeps out the cold, snow and rain, 
and prevents drafts. It permits, however, of a gentle 
circulation of air and thus far, with a little control, 
seems to be productive of satisfactory results. 

Considerable testing of dairy cows is now in prog- 
ress. Mr. Filer has seventy Jersey and Guernsey 
cows in the yearly test, Mr. Packard is testing at 
D. W. Fi Id's, Mr. Pomeroy at F. F. Field's, John 
R. BodurthaatJ. B. Marcous and Mr. Hepburn at 
Paul Cunningham's at Bolton. An application has 
just been received for similar work from Mr. Herman 
Cheney of Southbridge. 

Mr. Haskins of the fertilizer division is at present 
engaged in the analyses of soils in connection with 
the asparagus experiments at Concord. He is like- 
wise conducting an examination of tobacco soils sent 
from Hatfield. This soil will not grow tobacco and he 
is endeavoring to ascertain the cause of the trouble. 
It is intended also to cooperate with the botanical 
department in experimenting with soils for cucumber 
growing. 

Messrs. Holland and MacLaurin are very busy in 
an investigation of the effect of food upon the compo- 
sition of butter fat. Dr. MacLaurin is also endeavor- 
ing to i mprove the method for the determination of 
the melting point of fat. 

This department has recently added a number of 
new books to its working library among which may be 
mentioned Warrington's Chemistry of the Farm. 
Fisher's Physiology of Alimentation, Die Fiittermittel 
des Handels, Kellner's Fiitterungslehre and Wagner's 
Anwendung Kunstliche Diingemittel 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The 1909 Junior Prom, will be held Feb. 14. 
1008. For particulars, and invitations address 
Myron W. Thompson, Amherst, Mass. 

rhe annual meeting and dinner of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Alumni Club of Massachu- 
setts, will be held at Young's Hotel, Boston, Jan. 31 
at 7 p. m. All graduates of M. A. C, and former 
students, are welcomed whether enrolled members of 
the club or not. Do not wait for a formal invitation. 
The secretary is glad to send such an invitation to 
any who might come but finds it very hard to get re- 
liable addresses especially of the younger men. 

The special guest and speaker for the dinner will 
be Robert Lincoln O'Brien, editor of The Boston 
Transcript, an experienced Washington correspondent 
who will have something to say about Presidential 
Possibilities. President Butterfield will be there and 
some of the members of the Legislature who are 
interested In the college. F. W. Davis, Sec'y. 



73— Prof. D. P. Penhallow of McGill University, 
Montreal, Canada was elected President of tlv 
American Society of Naturalists at the annual meet- 
ing held at Chicago the latter part of last month. 

'81 A. W. Spaulding, '81. visited college for a 
few hours recently. This is the first time that he has 
returned since his graduation twenty-seven years ago. 
He was very much impressed with the remarkable 
growth of the college. After graduation he settled 
in Minneapolis as an architect but for the last five 
years has been established at Seattle, Wash., where 
he has met with a large degree of success, having 
had the supervision of the construction of numerous 
important buildings. 

*87 — e. F. Richardson was among the delegation 
of Grangers which visited college recently. 

'05 — Frank A. Bartlett, Superintendent for H. L 
Frost & Co., White Plains. N. Y. 

'05 — The second annual class letter appeared the 
first week in January and contained an account of the 
careers of the members of the class, since the issu- 
ance of the previous letter. It is a great source of 
satisfaction to the various members to learn how well 
each is getting along and it is the sincere wish of the 
class that those classes to come may be as well 
started on the path of advancement when only two ana 
one half years out of college. 



fl.OO VKRY SPECIAL WI.OO 

NEW SPRING NECKWEAR 

We have made up specially for this season a line of PURE SILK 
KNIT Ties to sell at 

#1.00 

Fine mannish mixtures in newest purple, maroon, grey, blues, browns, 
greens, black, white and other colors too numerous to mention. 

Also a beautiful range of two-toned stripes, blue and white, purple and 
white, maroon and white, black and red, red and brown, grey and violet and 
many others. 

We invite your inspection. 

•AlWa^s Welcome-bdy or i)ot 



J 



. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSINCI. MICHKJAN 
KINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT course: MEN 
I place buttcrmakerrs, cheesemakers. managers, 
herdsmen, elc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 



flmneisi House Barber Shop 



Four First Class Barbers 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying,Cleaning, Pressing, and Repairing. 



<>t>eii Mondays from 


7 A . M . 


to 8 l\ M 


Tuesdays ; 


, 14 


6 « 


Wednesdays, ; 


, 14 


8 M 


Thursdays, 7 


•• 


6 " 


Fridays, ; 


. it 


8 ♦' 


Saturdays, j 


• i 


11 " 



A II unli'H promptly attended to. 
Inop me a postal and I will call on you. 
■hul I IINH suit * to rent. «y>Studenta' ( lothea bounlit 

11 Amity Street, Amhkkst, Mass. 

GOODS FOR MEN 




JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets. Comfortables and Towels. 



C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMfOKTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS 



RaDars Jim, 



01,1 South Street, off Main. 



NORTHAMPTON, MA*s 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



Modern Improvement**, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PEH DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



THB BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It in a Natural Manure. 

0TMM Strong, Vigorous, Healthy I'lant* That liiaiat J)i»eanr 

UK. 0EOMS K. STONE. I'rofeaaor of Botany at the Muhi 
Agricultural Collt-K*', "mi 1'ioftM-oi 01 riant Die***** at tba 
Hatch Kxperiinent Matlon, Amhemt. Mh»«., write* to our 
Agricultural Kzperl a» lollown : 

"1 will »ay that I consider the formula which you 
prepared for Mr. I'reeeoti auil applied l>> him on IiIh 
beda was very effectual in controlling the a»paragu« 
ruat. The application of your formula and other fea- 
tures which were carrieil out In the management of 
theae betla convince uie that it constituted the beitt 
■lemon t rat ion of the control of aaparagu» runt which 
haa ever been made In tola country." 
OnroiME PERUVIAN i.tAVO forme. I the baala of the 
above mentioned formula. It waa used on the asparagus heda 
of C, W. I'ebscott.. Concord, Maee., the largest Individual 
grower of AxparagUM in New England. We also offer 

WK ALSO OFFKIt 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Sla#, 

Potanh Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materlala from New York, Roaton, 

at ana., and Charleston, 8. C. 

our beautifully tlluatrated HO page book on " I'lant Food 
Problems," Is tent free of charge. 

THE COE-MORtTMER CO., 

Sole Importers for IT. S. of Genuine Peruvian Guano, and 
Manufacturer* of High Grade Fertlliaere. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



Athletes Attention! 




our trademark means 
^end for our Catalogue 



In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
something. 
It kl free to any addrn- 



wkigut dfe orrsoiv 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

if WSS1 30m ST.. NEW YORK 

CHI! AGO I'kovidkn' f, R. I. Cambridge. Mass. 



"For the 



Land's Sake 



»» 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



dill 



They enrich the ear' 
and those who till it. 






HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Flse. 



K. A. THOMPHON, 



Kami First National Bank. 



AMMKRSJ 



CapsandGotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , New YoRg. 




) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

•_>7 Main St., Northampton 

Manouic Mock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunelle*. Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for its exirllent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Cloaed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. u. 



W W. BOTNTON, 

MAMUFACTUMB OF 

SODA ^WA/M&KS, 

Pineapple Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Gmjer 
Ale. Kountatne charged te> order 



Kivbk Stkkkt, 



NUKTHAHrlON, Hill. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR, 

Has received the lab-st fabrics for the spriag ami summer 
trade of '07 in Geutlemen't* Garments. Also <loe* Latliew' 
Garments in a satisfactory mauner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

fcf-MMtary Work a Specialty ...££ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp-to-Datc. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



Special Attention given to Athletic Team*, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BKST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES 

I). H. KENDRICK, Projtrietor. 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 1 i Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpel Renovating Establishment. 

>I.A.O.A«'t, H.M.JENNI«OIV.'OW 

Oet Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
>> >> Thursday delivered Saturday. 

AH:«ATIBFAOTION OUARA.NTBBD. t^ 

H. A. UTLKY, Ma»m V -r. 

OFFICE : 

East Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THE 



COLLEGE STORE 



The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothee are made on the Nkw Home Sewin<. 
Machine, which fact, aesures them of no "rips " Mother- 
should get one at once aa It will do for their children In year* 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Ellsworth N. Brown, I). U.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTI.KR'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



O. S. GATES, !>.!>.«. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 



I I I I.KR'S IIMMJK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



£. B. DICKINSON, D. JJ. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... AMHERST, MASS 

OFFICE HOUM: 
9 TO 18 A.. Ml., 1-30 TO 6 I». *A. 

Kllier and Nitroua Oxide Gaa administered whou desired. 

TH URBERS 

VARIETY STORE. 



GoiiDBGtiGut Valley street Baiiway Co. 

I an will leave A m lie i -t ami Northampton on Hip hour aa<l 
hell lioui iroin « :io a. m. till 10.30 r. M. Sumley- Hit- ili-i <ai 
will leave at ».:» A. M. 

Main Omit., ghilicnuklo, Makb. 

John A.Taggart, Supt. 

SOUTHAMPTON OFFICE, 10-J MAIN ST. 

« W. Clasp, Ai»t. Supt. Telephone, Northampton. HM'i. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To eavt your aole. Come to me tor your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a aperlalty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Maul. 



Next to Fsot Offica, 



AMHERST. MASS 



Are you in need of a 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 

Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and II 
minutes past each hour until I.M t. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until y. .10 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amheret. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO .IAN. I, IWW 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 



SELLS 



GOOD COAL 



AT RIGHT PRICES. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 1.41 p. u. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m.„ 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HAN LEY, 
(General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



) 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

To take home or to send to friends nothing 
is better than a good Potted Plant— Fern, Palm or 
Begonia. * 




See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

OF HORTICULTURE, M. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Author E. Dork. L. II. Tourtklottk. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE l>BALKKI AND JOBBEKft IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, IAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezer*. 

Corner North snd I'nion Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




I UK LARGB8T COLLBGK ENGRAV- 
ING HOl'SK IN TDK WORM). 



Works: 17th Street ileW Ave. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery. Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue;. 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engraven r»y merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



PHOTOGKAPHEK, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St.. 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



^ckitlaros 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



142 Main Street. 



NOKTHAMITON, MaS» 



Tel. MM. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NEAR KX PRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection. AEHERST, MASS. 



J. H.TROT1' 



PIPER. STEHm * HAS FITTER. 

m DEILEI II STOVES III IIICEt. 



Shop 15 i-j North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE^ND CARPET STORE. 



A COIIPLBTR LINK OK GOODS 
■CmO) I" IIIK -iiUKMs WAM«« 

Bedsteads, .Mattresses, Pillows, study Desks and 

Chans, Lounges, Window Shades. Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, ete.. ete. 



411 gwdi Sfu<t/y Cash and at /.on-fst flrictt. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix Row. 



Amhkkst. Mam. 



LET 



"BILL 



I » 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

snig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO All 
M. A, C. I K\DI 
15 Pairs "t Pasts Prtissiid foe J1.50. 



J. A. 

KLEASANl SI 



URNER. 

OVER sMHBRSI BAKERY, 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



K8T \ Bl hill n ISftl 



EIMER& AMEND, 

106-211 Third Ave.. DOT. IKtli Street, 

NEW YORK. 

IMI'ilKIKKK AM' MAM I \i II 1(1 H* "I 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 

We handle the beat of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

Near .smith College. 

Ann rieau Plan, 8:1.00 to 81.00. 

European I'lan, Rooms with Hath 81.0(1, «l.. r >0 and 
82.00 per day. 

Special Rates to ( olUgt Men. 

HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKB, mass 



Famous for its popular prieed Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Hampiets 
and Class Dinners. 

GBO. II. KOWKKIt A CO. 



\ Ft II. I. INI oh 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and .Sunday Papers. 






AMHa$f , aa$$. 



) 



~£s»-* TH E >«^+- 

flftaesacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AN1» 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



1- SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Coirsk in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bkk Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Kntomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, (Jer 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterhelo, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SI&SAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 9 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 12. 1906 



) 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 

SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR . PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 




Deuel's Drug Store. 



E. E. MILLETT, 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, WAWDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 

OCCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



GO TO . . . 



Page's Shoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing clone by power machines. a> 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONET 

to pay college expenses 



W. R. BROWN 
Savim.s Bank Blo< k. 



AMHKRST. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 12. 1908 



NO. 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Csramunicatioas should be addressed. Collsoi Siowal. Amhmst. Mass. Thb Siokal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance ,s ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

lotifv the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

O. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Assistant Edtor 

O. B. BRICCS. 1909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1906. Department Notes. W. E. ADAMS. 1909 Atumni Notes 

J. R. PARKER. 1908. Athletics. E - F ' DAMON. 1910 

H. T. WHEELER. 1908. College Notes. W. R. CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 

Texas. $1.00 per uear in adeence. Single Copies. 10c. Postage oatside ef Units* States and Canada. ttftc. aatr e. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Association. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Associat-on 
Base Ball Association 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec 
M. W. Thompson. Manage- 
H. M. Jennison. Manager 
S. S. Crosaman, Managei ■ 
College Senate, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President 



J. R.Parker . Pres. 
R.D. LuT. Manager 
CM. White. Pres. 
H M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-ckas metier. Post Office at Amherst. 




Get your competitive work for qualification for the 
Sicnal Board in as early in the near future as pos 
sible. Elections to the board will take place within 
the next three weeks, and competition is bound to be 
close if it continues at the present rate. The mem- 
bers of the freshman class seem to be lacking some- 
what in interest. It is a matter of class and college 
loyalty, and as such should appeal to everyone. 

In the past it has frequently been the custom of 
the Sicnal editorial staff, at this time of the year, 
when material for "space-filler" is hard to obtain, to 
call into requisition the literary efforts of various well- 
meaning students in the line of essays, stories, novel- 
etts, etc. The present issue represents a departure 
from this precedent in that the editor has borrowed 
his "space-filler" from a writer and scientist of tried 
and recognized worth. The matter reprinted is not 
wholly unrelated to our work here at M. A. C, 
emphasizing as we do the natural sciences. The 



object of reprinting, however, is merely to fill space 
— a frank enough admission. Thoss who object to 
such an imposition upon their valuable time are 
advised to overlook the matter referred to ; all others 
are advised to look H over, for, after all, it is not at 
all bad reading matter. 



The question of track-athletics has again been 
brought up, and deserves more than just the passing 
notice which it has been wont to receive in times 
past. The demand for, and efforts toward, an ath- 
letic field are always with us, but this question of 
track athletics has, up to date, always been side 
tracked as something no doubt desirable, but as 
belonging to that dim future which always promises 
much, but which, when become present, realizes 
little. The editor of the 1908 Index, in an appeal on 
this matter addressed particularly to his fellow class 
mates, endeavored to make the point that the surest 
road to an athletic field is along the line of track- 
athletics. And there are those today who still main- 
tain the same views. Football and baseball can be 



II 



. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



played on any level piece of ground offering suitable soil 
conditions (at the same time admitting that the sports 
named would be far better supported in the advent 
of an enclosed Held,) but for track- athletics there 
must be special equipment, — a track laid, sections 
reserved and kept in condition for jumping, vaulting, 
etc. When the students of M. A. C. show that, 
either through systematized inter-class or intercollegi- 
ate track-athletics, there is a demand for an equiped 
athletic field, that demand will justify itself, and meet 
with a prompt response. Until then we shall get the 
state of affairs which significantly insinuates that in 
the past present conditions have sufficed, and may 
reasonably be expected to suffice for at least a few 
years to come. The present state of affairs regard- 
ing an athletic field admit that the college owns prop- 
erty suitable for these purposes. But this property 
will never, from present indications, be secured for 
these purposes until the student demand proves itself 
greater and more inslstant than the present demand 
and utility of the property for experimental purposes. 
The conditions are only the more aggravating because 
of the existence of an alumni fund for an athletic 
field and the impossibility of utilizing this fund through 
inability to purchase suitable land near and accessible 
to the college. 

It may appear that the editor is getting confused on 
his subject. No effort has been made to keep the 
subject of track athletics and of an athletic field separ- 
ate, inasmuch as we have started with the assumption 
that they are closely related. The one seems to be 
a way and a means to the other. Let it not be 
understood that we insist on this point to the exclu- 
sion of the demands which the support of football and 
baseball make for an enclosed athletic field. Our 
point is that the two ideas should work together to 
create a more insistant demand which must event- 
ually accomplish its object. The present issue is, 
however, concerned primarily with inter-class track- 
athletics. Will the student body show interest enough 
and produce leaders enough to make the thing go. If 
a few men in each class, possessing the proper 
amount of push, and holding the sympathy of their 
classmates, will get together and really make an issue 
of the question it cannot help but promise success. 
There is first-class material in the various classes 
that only needs the opportunity to develop itself. The 



question of equipment of the campus for track pur- 
poses is not very serious, and envolves no great expen- 
diture, provided we can count on some sympathy and 
aid from the departments which may well aid in the 
work. It is only a question of getting under way. 



Athletic Notts- 

BASKETBALL. 

Springfield Training School, 34 ; Mass'chusetts,9. 
Springfield Training School defeated Massachusetts 
at basket ball in the Training School Gymnasium Sat 
urday evening Feb. I. The M. A. C. players were 
handicapped by playing Y. M. C. A. rules to which 
they were not accustomed, and this was the cause of 
a large number of fouls being called, even though the 
game was a clean one. Team work was a feature of 
the evening but it was constantly broken up and scores 
prevented by close covering. The training school 
didn't have much advantage in the first half. Both 
teams succeeded in getting only two baskets each 
from the floor in this half but Springfield Training 
School got six points in free tries as a result of the 
visiting team's unfamiliarity with the rules. In the 
second half the training school played better and 
ran the score up to 34 while 9 was all M. A. C. 
could get. 

Messer played a good game at left forward and 
made 1 successful throws out of 1 5 free tries. 

TRAINING SCHOOL. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Messer. I. f. r. g.. Neale 

McCulloch. r. f. L g . Regan. Willis 

Winters, c. c. Daniels 

Bailey. 1. g. r. L Cobb 

Miller, r. g. I. f., Burke 

Score— Training School 34. Massachusetts 9. Coals from 
floor— Messer 3, McCulloch 3. Winters 4. Bailey 2. Daniels 
2. Neale. Regan. Coals from fouls — Messer 10. Burke. 
Referee— Jones. Umpires — Lynch and Jennison. Tim* 
20-minutes halves. Attendance— 300. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



When a bit of sunshine hits ye. 

After passing of a cloud. 
When a fit of laughter gits ye 

An' yer spine is feelin' proud. 
Don't fergit to up and fling it 

At a soul that's feelin' blue. 
For the minit that ye sling it 

It's a boomerang to you. 

Captain Jack Crawford 




President Butterfield addressed the men's club of 
Hatfield, Tuesday, Feb. 4. 

The Juniors are already at work in decorating the 
Drill-hall in preparation of the Junior Promenade, 
which comes Feb. 14. Evergreens will be used in 
abundance as in years past. 

Prof. F. B. Mumsford of the University of Mis- 
souri visited college recently, making an inspection 
of the various departments. Professor Mumsford is 
professor of animal husbandry at Missouri. 

Midyear examinations began Saturday, Feb. 1, 
and continued through Wednesday the 5th. Regis- 
tration took place Tuesday and Wednesday, the 
remainder of the week being given to the students 
(as well as faculty) as a short recess before the begin- 
ning of the second semester, Monday, Feb. 10. In 
view of this arrangement of exercises chapel services, 
both daily and Sunday, were omitted. 

The college was represented by a strong team of 
workers at the hearing before the Committee on Agri- 
culture of the State Legislature at Boston, Jan. 29. 
Ex-Senator Charles A. Gleason of Springfield, repre- 
senting the State Board of Agriculture, opened the 
hearing telling of the growth and needs of the college. 
Others present were President Butterfield of the col- 
lege. President Carroll D, Wright of Clark College 
and trustee of M. A. C, Secretary Ellsworth of the 
State Board, Representative Hosmer of Amherst, 
Ex- Representative and Prof. James B. Paige, Prof. 
William P. Brooks, P'of. E. A. White, Trustees M. 
F. Dickinson, George N. Ellis and Preston, Ex- 
Representative Warren C. Jewett of Worcester, P. 
M. Harwood of Barre. agent of the State Dairy 
Bureau; Ex-Councilor W. W. Rawson, Elmer D, 
Howe of Marlboro, Ex- Representative Ladd of 
Southbridge, ex-master of the State Grange, and 
other interested men and women. President Butter 
field submitted a very ample statement of the educa- 
tional and financial situation, showing how the college 
is growing in many ways and fulfilling its mission in a 
a conspicuous degree, but in a way which calls for 
more money than ever. From all appearaces the 



hearing was successful and promising of careful con- 
sideration and attention to the claims set forth by the 
representatives of the college. 



THE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H, Fowler '87. 
4. The College Established. 

On Dec. 14, 1857, Hon. Justin S. Morrill of Ver- 
mont presented a bill in the House of Representa- 
tives requesting Congress to donate public lands to 
each State and Territory which might provide colleges 
for the benefit of agriculture and the mechanic arts. 
Though reported at first adversely, and after passage 
vetoed by President Buchanan, this bill was finally 
approved by President Lincoln July 2, 1862. 

The Massachusetts State Board of Agriculture 
went on record April 7, 1858, by a resolution most 
heartily approving the objects of the bill and request 
ing the Massachusetts Senators and Representatives 
in Congress to render their best aid in securing the 
passage of said bill into a law. This Board also on 
Jan. 8, 1861, adopted a resolution offered by Mr. 
Levi Stockbridge of Hadley (afterwards president of 
the Mass. Agricultural College), to the effect that in 
the opinion of the Board the time had arrived for the 
inauguration of measures tending to the establish 
ment of an agricultural school of high grade under the 
patronage of the Commonwealth. 

On the 25th of the same month, at the instance of 
Mr. James S. Grinnell of Greenfield (for many years 
a trustee of the college) the Board, believing that the 
establishment of an agricultural school would advance 
the interests of agriculture in the Commonwealth, 
expressed himself as disposed to give its influence to 
any well directed plan for such a school. This action 
was followed by the appointment of Messrs. Marshall 
P. Wilder, Freeman Walker. William S. Clark, 
Levi Stockbridge and Charles S. Sewall as a com- 
mittee ,; to co-operate at their discretion with any 
men or body of men who have any plan for an agri- 
cultural school, and to present and report their pro- 
ceedings at the next meeting of the Board." 

His Excellency Governor John A. Andrew in his 
inaugural address on Jan. 9, 1863, referred to the 
"Morrill Act" in the following words — 



I" 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




"At the last session of Congress an Act was passed 
(chapter 130 of Acts of the 37th Congress. 1st ses- 
sion) granting to each of the several states a portion 
of the public domain to the endowment, support and 
maintenance of at least one college, where the lead- 
ing object shall be, without excluding other scientific 
and classical studies, and including military tactics, 
to teach such branches of learning as are related to 
agriculture and the mechanic arts in such manner as 
the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical edu- 
cation of the industrial classes in the several persuits and 
professions in life. The apportionment to each State 
is in quantity equal to 30,000 acres of land for each 
senator and representative in Congress to which the 
states are respectively entitled by the apportionment 
under the census of 1860." 

As Massachusetts had twelve members in Con- 
gress at this time her allotment was 360,000 acres 
of land. 

At a meeting of the State Board of Agriculture 
held Feb. 27. 1862, Col. Wilder made a statement 
of the doings of the committee previously appointed. 
After some discussion Dr. George B. Loring (after- 
wards U. S. Commissioner of Agriculture) presented 
several resolutions, which were unanimously adopted. 
These resolutions referred to the grant of land by 
Congress, expressed the opinion that the grant should 
be principally devoted to the establishment of an 
educational institution for the practical and scientific 
study of agriculture, and for the instruction of youths 
who intended to follow industrial pursuits, and that the 
institution should not be immediately connected with 
any institution established for other purposes. The 
Board appointed a committee to bring these resolu- 
tions to the attention of the Legislature, and to 
express the views of the Board upon the proper dis- 
tribution of the Congressional grant. 

The Committee on Education, by E. 0. Haven, 
chairman, made a 48-page report to the Senate on 
March 26, 1863. In this report the Act of Congress 
was quoted, and references made to "The Fund to 
be expected from the Act," "The Object of the 
Donation," "How to accomplish the Design." 
"Object of a Professional College*', and "Connection 
with other Colleges," together with the report of a 
sub-committee that visited the Agricultural College of 



Pennsylvania. The report closed with the following 
recapitulation: — 

1. Your committee are united in the opinion of 
the actual demand for the establishment of an Agri- 
cultural College on a practical basis, similar to the 
one in Pennsylvania, in Massachusetts. 

2. That such a college should be wholly discon- 
nected with all existing institutions, and separate from 
all large cities and towns. 

3. That it should recognize the principle of daily 
manual labor by its students as essential to success. 

4. That the necessary funds for the founding of 
the institution should be contributed equally by the 
state and individuals. 

In view of these facts the committee recommended 
the following, and submitted bills. 

1 . The grant of Congress to the state of Massa 
chusetts should be received, and the conditions be 
faithfully complied with. 

2. One-tenth of the whole amount should be set 
apart for the purchase of lands to be used in connec- 
tion with the agricultural college proper ; and of the 
remaining nine-tenths one-third should be devoted to the 
use of the Institute of Technology, under the direction 
of the trustees thereof; and the remaining two-thirds 
should be devoted to the use of an agricultural college 
under the control of a board of trustees. 

Sen. William D. Swan of Dorchester presented a 
minority report under date of March 30th, with 
accompanying resolves. He did not appear to be in 
favor of an independent institution, but favored rather 
the appointment of a commission by the Governor to 
purchase the life estate which then encumbered the 
Bussey Institution, and to enter into consultation with 
the college and societies which might aid in the 
establishment and maintenance of an agricultural and 
mechanical college, with instructions to report to the 
next Legislature. 

The results, however, were the enactment (Chap 
ter 166) of "An Act to provide for the Reception of 
a Grant of Congress, and to create a Fund for the 
Promotion of Education in Agriculture and the 
Mechanic Arts'" and (Chapter 220) "An Act to 
incorporate the Trustees of the Massachusetts Agri 
cultural College." 

By section 4 of the first act it was provided that all 
moneys received from the sale of the land scrip were 



to be immediately deposited with the treasurer of the 
Commonwealth, who was to invest and hold the same. 
The moneys so invested were to constitute a perpetual 
iand for the promotion of education in agriculture and 
the mechanic arts, which were to be appropriated and 
used in such manner as the Legislature should pre- 
scribe, and in accordance with the Act of Congress. 

The act of incorporating contained nine sections, 
the corporators or original trustees being Marshall P. 
Wilder of Dorchester, Charles G. Davis of Plymouth, 
Nathan Durfee of Fall River, John Brooks of Prince- 
ton, Henry Colt of Pittsfield, William S. Southworth 
of Lowell, Charles C. Sewall of Medfield, Paoli 
Lathrop of South Hadley, Phinehas Stedman of 
Chicopee, Allen W. Dodge of Hamilton, George 
Marston of Barnstable, William B. Washburn of 
Greenfield, Henry L. Whiting of Tisbury and John B. 
King of Nantucket. Governor John A. Andetson, 
Secretary Joseph White of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, and Secretary Charles L. Flint of the State 
Board of Agriculture were also members ex officio of 
the first board of trustees. 

It was left to the trustees to determine the location 
of the college, and they were to secure, by purchase 
or otherwise, in connection therewith, a tract of land 
containing at least one hundred acres, to be used as 
an experiment farm or otherwise, so as best to pro- 
mote the objects of the institution. In the establish- 
ing of by-laws and regulations of the college the trus- 
tees were to make such provision for the manual labor 
of the students on said farm as they might deem just 
and reasonable. The location, plan of organization, 
government and course of study prescribed for the 
college were to be subject to the approval of the 
Legislature. 



NATURE AND SUPERNATURE. 

Experience speedily taught them (thinking men) 
that the shifting scenes of the world's stage have a 
permanent back ground : that there is order amidst 
the seeming confusion, and that many events take 
place according to unchanging rules. To this region 
of familiar steadiness and customary regularity they 
gave the name of Nature. But, at the same time, 
their infantile and untutored reason, little more, as 
yet, than the playfellow of the imagination, led them 
to believe that this tangible, commonplace, orderly 



world of Nature was surrounded and interpenetrated 
by another intangible and mysterious world, no more 
bound by fixed rules than, as they fancied, were the 
thoughts and passions which coursed through their 
minds and seemed to exercise an intermittent and 
capricious rule over their bodies. They attributed to 
the entities, with which thsy peopled this dim and 
dreadful region, an unlimited amount of that power of 
modifying the course of events of which they them- 
selves possessed a small share, and thus came to 
regard them as not merely beyond, but above, 
Nature. 

Hence arose the conception of a "Supernature"' 
antithetic to "Nature" -the primitive dualism of a 
natural world "fixed in fate" and a supernatural, left 
to the free play of volition— which has pervaded all 
later speculation and. for thousands of years, has 
exercised a profound influence on practice. For it 
is obvious that, on this theory of the Universe, the 
successful conduct of life must demand careful atten 
tion to both worlds ; and. if either is to be neglected, 
it may be safer that it should be Nature. In any 
given contingency, it must doubtless be desirable to 
know what it may be expected to happen in the ordi- 
nary course of things; but It must be quite as 
necessary to have some Inkling of the line likely to be 
taken by supernatural agencies able, and possibly 
willing, to suspend or reverse that course. Indeed, 
logically developed, the dualistic theory must needs 
ends in almost exclusive attention to Supernature, 
and in trust that its overruling strength will be exerted 
in favour of those who stand well with its denizens. On 
the other .hand, the lessons of the great schoolmaster, 
experience, have hardly seemed to accord with this 
conclusion. They have taught, with considerable 
emphasis, that it does not answer to neglect Nature ; 
and that, on the whole, the more attention paid to her 
dictates the better men fare. 

Thus the theoretical antithesis brought about a 
practical antagonism. From the earliest times of 
which we have any knowledge. Naturalism and Super- 
naturalism have consciously, or unconsciously, com- 
peted and struggled with one another ; and the vary- 
ing fortunes of the contest are written in the records 
of the course of civilization, from those of Egypt and 
Babylonia, six thousand years ago, down to those of 
our own time and people. 



Il 



) 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



These records inform us that, so far as men have 
paid attention to Nature, they have been rewarded 
for their pains. They have developed the Arts which 
have furnished the conditions of civilised existence ; 
and the Sciences, which have been been a progressive 
revelation of reality and have afforded the best dis- 
cipline of the mind in the methods of discovering 
truth. They have accumulated a vast body of univer- 
sally accepted knowledge ; and the conceptions of 
man and of society, of morals and of law, based upon 
that knowledge, are every day more and more, either 
openly or tacitly, acknowledged to be the foundations 
of right action. 

History also tells us that the field of the supernatu- 
ral has rewarded its cultivators with a harvest, per- 
haps not less luxuriant, but of a different character. 
It has produced an almost infinite diversity of Relig- 
ions. These, if we set aside the ethical concomit- 
ants upon which natural knowledge also has a claim, 
are composed of information about Supernature ; they 
tell us of the attributes of supernatural beings, of their 
relations with Nature, and of the operations by which 
their interference with the ordinary course of events 
can be secured or averted. It does not appear, how- 
ever, that supernaturalists have attained to any agree- 
ment about these matters, or that history indicates a 
widening of the influence of supernaturalism on prac- 
tice, with the onward flow of time. On the contrary, 
the various religions are, to a great extent, mutually 
exclusive ; and their adherents delight in charging 
each other, not merely with error, but with criminality, 
deserving and ensuing punishment of infinite severity. 
In singular contrast with natural knowledge, again, the 
acquaintance of mankind with the supernatural appears 
the more extensive and the more exact, and the 
influence of supernatural doctrines upon conduct the 
greater, the further back we go in time and the lower 
the stage of civilisation submitted to investigation. 
Historically, indeed, there would seem to be an 
inverse relation between supernatural and natural 
knowledge. As the latter has widened, gained in 
precision and in trustworthiness, so has the former 
shrunk, grown vague and questionable; as the one 
has more and more filled the sphere of action, so has 
the other retreated into the region of meditation, or 
vanished behind the screen of mere verbal recognition. 



Whether this difference of the fortunes of Natural- 
ism and of Supernaturalism is an indication of the 
progress, or of the regress, of humanity; of a fall 
from, or an advance towards, the higher life ; Is a 
matter of opinion. The point to which I wish to 
direct attention is that the difference exists and is 
making itself felt. Men are growing to be seriously 
alive to the fact that the historical evolution of human- 
ity, which is generally, and I venture to think not 
unreasonably, regarded as progress, has been, and is 
being, accompanied by a co-ordinate elimination of 
the supernatural from its originally large occupation of 
men's thoughts. The question — How far is this 
process to go? — Is, in my apprehension, the Contro- 
verted Question of our time. 

— T. H. Huxley, 1892. 



D{p&rtm{rvt* ftotfs. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Mr. Shaw, a post graduate, has recently been in 
Boston repacking the Greenings grown in the station 
orchard, and which had been placed in cold storage at 
Boston to test their keeping qualities. He reports 
that the fruit has kept perfectly, but that the Green 
ings from the trees fertilized with ground bone and 
low grade sulphate of potash show the best quality 
and appearance. 

Fertilizer experiments on lettuce and tomatoes 
have been started in the station greenhouses. 

ENTOMOLOGY. 
H. J. Franklin has successfully completed his 
studies and examinations in entomology for the degree 
of Ph. D. though he will not receive his degree until 
June. 



Alu 



mm. 



71. — Mr. Gideon H. Allen has presented the 
Botanical Department with his herbarium, which was 
collected in 1868. and has given the library some 
valuable historical matter. Among other things is 
the "Regatta Record." Vol. I, No. I, published in 
July, 1873, giving the history of the College boating 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



and a very full account of the Regatta which took 
place between Amherst. Bowdoin. Harvard. Yale. 
Wiliiams and M. A. C. in 1872. There is also a 
cony of the " Register," Vol. I. No. I. published in 
1871 and apparently one of the first college papers 
published. There is a circular giving an account of 
the first graduation exercises of the college, together 
with sj.ne other interesting papers of that period. 

'02.— Edward B. Saunders. Manager Swift & 
Company, Calais, Me. 

'02. — John M. Delleas. Great Barrington. 
Forester. 

'03. -Albert Parsons. Instructor in the Kame- 
hameha School. Honolulu, T. H. 

'03. — M. H. West has been elected secretary of 
tne park commission of Chicago and appointed super- 
intendent of the Lincoln Park system. This appoint- 
ment is a very flattering one for Mr. West and the 
best testimony which can be given concerning the 
excellent work which he has done since leaving col- 
lege. It is understood that the salary which goes 
with this position is a very generous one. 

'04.— Ernest A. Back, Washington. D. C. 



Home address, Florence, Mass. SpecUl Field Agent, 
United States Department of Agriculture, Bureau of 
Entomology. Author of " Dasypogoninae cf Norih 
America, North of Mexico, 

'04.- Maurice A. Blake, 197 Somerset Street. 
Now Brunswick, N. J. Horticulturist at the New 
Jersey State Experiment Station. 

04. — Fred F. Henshaw, United States Geological 
Survey, Washington, D. C. Hydraulic Engineer 
engaged on the Water Supply of Nome Region. 
Alaska. In charge of Steam Gauging, Seward 
Peninsula, Alaska. 

04. — Sumner R. Parker, Honolulu, 1'. H. Dairy 
Business. 

'04.— Raymond R. Raymoth. Rockford. III. Land- 
scape Architect. 

'05 — W. M. Sears assumed the superintendency of 
" Arbordene ' ' the country estate of Dr. Nathaniel W. 
Emerson of Boston, one of the foremost surgeons of 
the East, on December I. 1907. " Arbordene " is 
to become the leading poultry and fruit farm near 
Boston, being situated in Norwood, about 17 miles 
out from the city. Address Norwood, Mass. 



H.OO VERY SPECIAL tJKI.lto 

NEW SPRING NECKWEAR 

We have made up specially for this season a lint- of PURE SILK 
KNIT Ties to sell at 

$1,00 

Fine mannish mixtures in newest purple, maroon, grey, blues, browns, 
greens, black, white and other colors too numerous to mention. 

Also a beautiful range of two-toned stripes, blue and white, purple and 
white, maroon and white, black and red, red and brown, grey and violet and 
many others. 

We invite your inspection. 

-Always Welcome-bJy or i>ot 



i 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EnPLOYHENT AGENCY 

I.ANSINC1, MICHIGAN 
KINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT COURSE MEN 
I place buttermakerrs, theeseniakers. managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. 0. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



!. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

DyingXleaning. Pressing, and Repairing. 



All order* promptly attended to. 
Drop me a postal and I will nail on you. 
'hull l>rea» Suite to rent. ♦^-Htu.lenU' Clothe* bought 

11 Amity Street, Amherst, Mass. 



It's Your Next at the 



GOODS FOR MEN 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 
Tuesdays 
Wednesdays, 
Thursdays, 
Fridays, 
Saturdays, 



A. M. to 8 r, M. 
6 " 
8 " 

" 
8 " 
ii " 




JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



C. & K. DERBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS. 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED srVI.KS, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST. MASS 



Rabar's 3»n t 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASK 



old South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PES DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with as. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY 



R. J. RAHAR 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

•_'T Main St.. Northampton. 

Masonic Clock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigara Noted for Ita excellent 
Oyeter Stew and Clam Chowder. 

(lowed only from 1 a, m. to 4 a. m. 

W. W. BOYIVTOIV, 

MAMDPACTDKBB or 

SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple. Lemon and t.erman Tonie, Birch Beer and Winger 
Ale. fountain* charged te> order 



Rivbb Stbrkt, 



N'UBTHAMPTOM. Uill 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUB STORE. 



OUR IGE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

Me A* d 82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 



Cut Flowers always on hand. 



Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and HUiiimn 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garment*. Also <loen Ladles' 
Garments in a patlsfartot y manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Prenning promptly done. 

Kf~Militarv Work a Specialty ,«^j 
tinder the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES 

I). H. A* END RICK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

•XI. A..C. Att't. H.M.JK.NX'IMOA, «>« 



Oct Sample Rates for Washing. 
Wort taken Monday delivered Thursday. 

Thursday delivered Saturday. 

.^9s8ATI«rAOTION aUAStANTDBD. tW' 
H. A. VTI.KT, Mmumyrr. 

Officb 

Ewt Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COlvIvEGE STORE. 



The Children are Happy. 

Becauee their elothea are nia<le on the Nr.w Bomb Sbwikij 
Mac hire, which fact, assure* them of no "ripe." Mother* 
should r«t one at once aa It will <ln for their children in jeer* 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



J 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



hSTAi:i.IsilKI» 1851. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE>ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMHI.KTK LINK OK U<HI1>k 
*ITTBI> TO THE 8TUI>«MT8' WANT*. 

Medstcads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks an«l 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS Al»l> MARCPACTUBKRS Of 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GMD03DS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All fit Strictly Cash and at Lowest Pricts. 



E. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix Row. 



Amiikrst, Mass. 



LET 



BILL 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

N»-ar Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4. 00. 

Kuropean Plan, Rooms with Bath 11.00, 11.50 and 
$1.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



j > 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleaniy, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 



PLEASANT ST., 



OVER AMHERST BAKEKV 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A PULL LIME OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. 



Daily and Sunday Papers. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFK OPKN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER * CO. 



CAKKNta * fttftfrWUS*, 



NtWtttS, 



AnHfltff . Aa$s. 



THE COLLAGE SIGNAL 



Kllsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S |U.O< K. A mints'!, MASS 



DENTAL ROOMS, 



• I'TLER'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST. MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK AMHKRST. M ASS 

Umci Hours 
TO IS A*.. K*_. 1-30 TO 6 Z>. Ul . 

KMier and Nitrous Oxids Gas administered wlim desired. 



TH U RBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Psot Office, 



AMHERST MASS. 



Are you in need of a 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 

AMHERST CO-OP. 



GonneciiGut Valley Street Railway Go. 

amhmm»t utriatoN. 

Lara will lea\ • AuilieiNi Hu.t Northampton on tut hour au.i 
hair houi 1 1011. « 30 a. M. till 10.80 e.M. Mun.iay* the flr-i car 
will Intp at 8.30 a. M. 

Main orrich, Urkrnkiri.ii, Mams. 
John a. TaKfc-art, Supt. 
. ,„ Northampton optics, 103 Main St. 

< « Clapc, \*»t. Supt. Telephone, Northampton li.% H. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To ut« your »ole. come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OrposiTK Town Mali.. 

iherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 



Care leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and H 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.. 10 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH. Sunt. 



Teh-phone 71-2 A inherit. 



C. R. ELDER 



SELLS 



GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO JAN. I, l«tH 

SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New Ix>ndon and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
expreaa, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Rrattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 r. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
(ieneral Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



i 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOR CHRISTMAS 

To take home or to send to friends nothing 
is better than a good Potted Plant-- Kern, Palm or 
I'.egonia. 



See PROFESSOR WHITE, 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. HI. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Arthur K. Dorr. L. B. Toubtklotte 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE HEALERS AND JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and I'nion Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 





PHOTOGKAPHER* 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St.. 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Claw and Group Work a Speeialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Man* 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 



THK LARGR8T COLLRGK K.NGRAV- 
IN«i HOU8K IN THK WORLD. 

.. Works: 17thStreet&Lehi£tiAve. 

|0 PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 

Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agrlcnltnrftl College. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NF.AK EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS 



J. H.TROTT 

PLUIBBEB, STEflUI ft GHS FITTER. 

Ill IEIIEI H STOVES III HUGHS. 



Shop 13 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amhent House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 

It in a Natural Manure 

9rtm Strong, Vii/orousjhalthy 1'lanlx J hut Bmltt Dixeatte 
l)K. (.KORUK E. STONE. Professor of BoUny at the Mass 
Agricultural College, and Professor ol Plant I»i»ea*ef>.t the 
Hatrh Kxperiuient station, Aii.berM, Man* ., writes to our 
Agricultural Expert hh follow*. 

"' W *R •»>' tj>»t 1 consider tlie formula which you 
prepared for Mr. Prexrott and applied by him on bin 
iie.ls wax very effectual in eontr Hum the asparagus 
run. The application of your formula and other fca 
lures which were carried out in the manaKeuieiit of 
tbeee beds convince me that it constituted the best 
<ieiuon*t ration of the control of asparagus ruxt which 
has ever been made in this country." 
GENUINE PERI'VIAN SUAFO formed the basis of tbe 
■ b " v « ">«?tloned r °«"niula. It was used on tbe asparagus beds 
or C, W I bbscott., concord, Mass., the largest individual 
grower of Asparagus in New England. Wealxooffei 

WK AUK) OFVKIt 

Nitrate of Soda. Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from Sew York, Boston 

Mass., and Charleston, 8. C. 

our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant food 

Problems," Is sent free of charge. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 




" For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



sole Importers for V. H. of Oeuiiine Peruvian Uuano 
Manufacturers of High Oracle r>rtiHzer H . 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



Mil ft 



33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been tost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not nave 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Kail, 
RunningShoes^Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
—our trademark means something. 

nd for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

WRIGHT «S? JDITSOIV 

v»4 WASHINGTON sr„ BOSTON 

d WEST 30TH SI., NSW YORK 

Chicago Providenc k, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 






HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Klsc 



«• A. THOMPSON, 

Hear First National Bank. AMHr Ks 




Caps and Gotons 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , New Yom. 



.>££-***{. T H EL •; - * h 



flfoassacbusetts 
H^vicultuval 

dolleae 



AMD 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITt 



I; SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Wintek Course in Dairy Farming. Open to person* of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen year, old and must furni.b certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins Brat Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

I A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following course, is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematic., Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with hi. Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Phy.ic, Engineering, Engli.h, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degree, of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United State.. 

Neccsary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. BviMMUU*, Amherst, Ma... 



THE COLLEGE SI&IAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 10 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS., FEBRUARY 26, 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 



E. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-ivork a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MANDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 







OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 
GO TO 

Page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Block, 



AMHERST. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. FEBRUARY 26, 1908 



NO. 10 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute Communication* should be addressed. Collboi Siohal. Amhmst. Mass. Thb Signal will be 
sent to aU subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

D. P. MILLER, 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R H. VERBECK, 1908. Business Manager. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Assistant Ed tor. 

O. B. BRICCS. 1 909. Assistant Business Manager. 
O. L. CLARK. 1908. Department Notes. w. E. ADAMS. 1909, Alumni Notes. 

J. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletics. E. F. DAMON, 1910. 

H. T. WHEELER, 1908. College Notes. W. R. CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 



Terms), $1 00 per near in adcance Single Copies, IOc. Postage outside of United States and Canada, 8«c. extra. 



Athletic Association. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. Fraternity Conference. 

M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman. Manager. 
College Senate, 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C. A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President. 



J. R.Parker . Pre*. 
R. D. Lul'. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi"tbriaJs. 



Mid- year examinations have come and gone, and 
with them have gone some who have failed to main- 
tain a required standing. As Is always the case, the 
freshmen have suffered most, some deservedly and 
some undeservedly through the workings of a system 
which eliminates the personal element and ties itself 
down to mere hard figures. And as is usual the air 
is full of discontent and grumbling, not entirely unjus- 
tifiable, because the -'system" has struck some who 
were least deserving of its knock-out blow, while 
others of more questionable standing have escaped 
unscathed. This Is not entirely the fault of the 
"system," which, by the way, is in the process of 
revision. No student of fair ability who is in college 
for a purpose, and who keeps that purpose in view, was 
ever in great danger of the workings of the "system." 
It is when students lose sight of the purpose and get 
careless that the danger line is approached. We all 
have these careless moments or periods, and it is 
then that the unfortunate suffer. If you haven't a 



purpose here at M. A. C, go somewhere else where 
you can slide along on your good luck and the len- 
iency of an indulgent faculty. M. A. C. needs men, 
but she needs men of the A 1 quality. Are you on? 



Athletic No-t*$. 



BASKETBALL. 

K. E. Glllett has resigned his captaincy of the 
basketball team and E. J. Burke who has been acting 
captain for a greater part of the season has been 
elected to take his place. 

Williams, 60 ; Massachusetts, 3. 
Williams won an easy victory over M. A. C. at 
basketball on the evening of February 12, at Wil- 
liamstown. The work of the Williams team was the 
best of the season, its team play being as regular as 
clock work. The guarding of the purple five was 
very effective and in the first half M. A. C. had very 
few opportunities for shots none of which resulted In 
scores. In the second period Neale tossed the only 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



basket for his side, which later Burke added a point 
from a free try. Williams scored 19 baskets in the 
first period and eleven in the second, a total of 30 in 
40 minutes of play. For Massachusetts, Burke's 
dribbles were the feature, and twice he carried the 
ball the length of the floor alone. Cobb passed surely 
but too fast for his team and the recipient generally 
dropped the ball. 



The line-up : — 
















Williams. 














Mass. A. C. 


Lewis 1 f 














r g. Neale 


Lambie, Watters, r f 














1 g Regan 


Horrax, Westbrook, c 














c. Daniels 


Templeton, 1 g 














r f Capt. Cobb 


Johnson. Oakley, r g 














1 f, Burke 


Score. — Williams, 


60. 


M. 


A. 


C. 


3. 


Coals from floor — 


Lewis 8. Lambie 3. 


Horrax 


7. 


Westbrook, 


Templeton 5. 



repeatedly from the Holy Cross guards, only to be 
covered again before being able to take advantage of 
the opportunity. The special features of this half 
were a long one-handed shot by Cobb and a clever 
piece of team work between Burke and Cobb, Burke 
dribbling the entire length of the floor and passing to 
Cobb, who caged a goal. The honors were split even 
I in this half, Holy Cross scoring but two baskets. 
The score : 



Johnson 4, Neale 1. Coal from foul — Burke. — Referee — 
Metzdrof of Springfield. Time. — 20 minute halves. 

Holy Cross, 16; M. A. C, 7. 

The college basketball team put up a good exhibi- 
tion of basketball in the Drill-hall Friday night, Feb. 
21, holding the fast Holy Cross quintet down to a 
score of 16 to 7. Holy Cross started the game with 
a rush and played throughout with characteristic 
speed, but closely covered by the M. A. C. men. 
The first half of the game witnessed the ball for the 
most part in Holy Cross hands in M. A. C. territory, 
the home team being able to get away only occa- 
sionally for a few passes down the floor. The cover- 
ing of the home teams was close, breaking up the 
team work of the Holy Cross players, and keeping 
them guessing as to where the ball would arrive and 
pass. The clever dodging of Stevens and the gen- 
eral excellence of the Holy Cross players in all fea- 
tures of the game characterized this half. Cobb 
scored one basket from the floor and one from a fine 
try for the home team, which was all the scoring M. 
A. C. did in this half. Out of many trys the Holy 
Cross players caged six baskets, making the final 
score of this half 12 to 3. 

Holy Cross came back equally as strong in the 
second half, but the home team, with Reganin place 
of Neale, came back more determined than ever. 
Stevens was unable to get away from Regan for a 
single try in this half, while Willis kept Dowd, the 
other Holy Cross forward, also on the jump. Burke 
and Cobb at forward for the home team broke away 



HOLY CROSS. 

Stevens. 1. f. 

Dowd, r. f. 

Casey, O'Connor, c. 

O'Neill. 1. g. 

Barry. Callahan, r. g. 

Score — Holy Cross 16. M. A. C 
Cobb, Casey 3. Barry 2. O'Neil, 
from foul — Cobb. Referee — Henry 
15 minute halves. Attendance 300. 



M. A. C. 

r. g.. Neale. Regan 
1. g.. Willis 
c, Daniels 
r. f.. Cobb 
1. f.. Burke 
7. Goals from floor- 
David, Stevens. Goal 
of Amherst. Time— 



CALENDAR. 

Feb. 26, Assembly, 1-30— Dean Geo. F. Mills, "A 
visit to Princeton University." 

Feb. 27, Basketball — University of Ven.unt at the 
Driil-hall. 

Feb. 29, Basketball— Worcester Tech. at the Drill- 
hall. 
1, Vespers at 5-00— Rev. J. G. Nichols of 
South Hadley. 

3, Stockbridge Club — Pres. G. C. Cushman 
of Ontario Agricultural College. 

4, Assembly, 1-30— Pres. G. C. Cushman of 
Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, Can. 

6, Basketball— Tufts at Medford. 

7, Informal Dance, Drill-hall. 

8, Vespers at 5-00— Rev. Samuel Eliot of 
Boston. 

1 1 , Assembly — E. C. Mercer of New York 

City. 
Mar. 13, Basketball— Springfield Training School at 

Amherst. 
Mar. 14, College Supper, Draper Hall, 6-00 p. m.— 

Dr. Charles Eastman. 
Mar. 15, Vespers at 5-00 — Rev. F. L. Goodspeed 

of Springfield. 
Mar. 17, Stockbridge Club— E. N. Foote of North- 
ampton. 
Mar. 18, Assembly, 1-30— Mr. Edwin D Mead of 

Boston. 
Mar. 22, Vespers at 5-00— Sec. F. H. Willis of the 

Worcester, Mass., Y. M. C. A. 



Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar, 

Mar. 



Colleg? Notts- 



A number of the seniors are taking a special course 
in Bacteriology under Dr. Paige. 

The Y. M. C. A. on Thursday, Feb. 20, was led 
by Mr. E. S. Conklin of the Springfield Training 
School. 

Rev. Calvin Stebbins of Framingham delivered 
an address commemorative of Lincoln, at the assem- 
bly on Feb. 14th. 

The senior class has elected a nominating com- 
mittee consisting of T. L. Warner, T. A. Barry, |. 
R. Parker and A. J. Anderson. 

Prof. W. R. Hart gave an address on "Nebraska" 
Wednesday night Feb, 19, before the Men's Club of 
the North Amherst Congregational church. 

H. B. Reed '08, has been at Brockton for 10 days 
recently conducting tests upon D. W. Field's cham- 
pion Holstein herd, the champion herd of the world. 

The joint committee on agriculture from the Senate 
and House of Representatives visited college Thurs- 
day, Feb. 13, inspecting the various buildings and 
investigating the demands of the college for appropria- 
tions. 

Mr. J. H. Hale of Glastonbury, Conn., spoke be- 
fore the Stockbridge club in the chapel on Feb. 17th. 
He also gave a very interesting talk at the assembly 
the following day. Mr. Hale is optimistic and en- 
thusiastic over the possibilities of New England soil. 

The senior class has elected the following class- 
day speakers: Class president, J. R. Parker; class 
oration, L. D. Larsen ; campus oration, H. C. Chase; 
hatchet oration, T. A. Barry; ivy poet, H. T. 
Wheeler; class ode, D. P. Miller; pipe oration, K. 
E. Gillett ; class song, L. W. Chapman. 

Mr. C. S. Pomeroy has a letter in the University 
Cynic, the student publication of University of Ver- 
mont, highly recommending the system of fraternity 
rushing in vogue at Massachusetts. For the benefit 
of our Vermont brothers, we may say that the system 
has proved itself far from perfect, though it has many 
good features to commend it or save similar system. 

Dr. W. H. Jordan, Director of the New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station, at Geneva, has ac- 



cepted an invitation to deliver the Commencement 
address of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
June 17, 1908. Dr. Jordan has for many years been 
one of the leading agricultural scientists and Experi- 
ment Station administrators of the country. He has 
also given a great deal of time and thought to the study 
of agricultural education and rural advancement. He 
is a vigorous and convincing orator and his address 
will be sure to be a virile and thoughtful contribution 
to the literature of the agricultural education and 
progress. 

The following class elections have been announced : 

1908, president, Robert Parker; vice-president, A. 
J. Farley; secretary and treasurer, J. A. Hyslop ; S. 
at A., J. A. Anderson; class captain, E. D. Philbrick. 

1909, president, C. White; vice-president, P. Alger; 
treasurer, R. D. Lull; secretary, M. F. Geer; hist. 
0. B. Briggs; captain, H. P. Crosby. S. at A., 
D. Curran. 1910, president, F. Haynes ; vice-presi- 
dent, L. S. McLaine; secretary and treasurer, L. S 
Dickinson; captain, L. Brandt. S. at A., W. S. 
Titus. The 1911 elections have not yet been made 
public. 

Pledges as a result of the 
season, which closed Thursday 
Feb. 13, are: Kappa Sigma, 
Chelsea, Henry B. Morse of 



fraternity rushing 

p. m. at 6 o'clock, 

George H . Grey of 

Salem, Edward A. 



Larrabee of Salem, Gordon H. Robb of Salem, 
Harold H. Howe of Springfield, Frederick A. Mc- 
Laughlin of Lee, Arthur Sharpeof Saxonvllle, Royal 
N. Hallowell of Jamaica Plain, Q. T. V., John 
Becker of Hyde Park, Arnold G. Bentley of Hyde 
Park, James F. Adams of Melrose, Irvin C. Gilgore 
of Schenectady, N. Y., Ralph W. Piper of South 
Acton, C. A. Smith of Northampton; Frank J. 
Schmitz of Waterbury. Ct., Samuel R. Parsons of 
North Amherst, Raymond C. Barrows of Stafford 
Springs, Ct., Chester Moody of Chelsea, Percy F. 
Pickard of Hopedale, Philip H. Prouty of Shrews- 
bury, F. W. Howard of Stockbridge, Ct. ; Phi Sigma 
Kappa, Robert Armstrong, 1910, of Rutherford, N. 
J., Albert E. Rockwood, 1910, of Concord, Park W. 
Allen of Westfield. James A. Davey of Kent, 0., 
E. Carl Whittaker of Ravenna 0., Ralph E. Wheeler 
of Foxboro, Harold F. Willard of Leominster, 
George P. Nlckerson of Amherst, Philias A. Racicot 





I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






of Lowell, RupertS. McNayr of Rockland, Nathaniel 
H. Hill of Glenmoore, N. J., Irving C. Brown of 
Natlck ; College Shakespearean club. Herbert W. 
Blaney of Swampscott, Arthur Burnham of Holyoke, 
Ernest L. Daniels of Cambridge, Charles P. Ham- 
mond of Lynn, William F. Hennessy of Dorchester, 
Charles A. Lodge of Manchester, Oswald Stevenson 
of England, George A. Tilton of Exter. 



THE JUNIOR PROMENADE. 

Had the weather gods been favorably inclined, the 
annual promenade Feb. 14 of the junior class might 
have been pronounced one of the most successful 
affairs of the kind which has ever taken place at the 
college. The juniors put special effort into the prepa- 
rations, outdoing their predecessors of previous years, 
and it was indeed a pity that the inclement weather 
conditions put at naught some of the plans, particu- 
larly those for the day following. The committee in 
charge of the promenade, consisting of C. R. Webb, 
chairman, Prof. P. B. Hasbrouck, Capt. G. C. Mar- 
tin, Prof. E. A. White, M. H. Thompson, A. H. 
Hubbard, R. C. Lindblad, H. W. Turner, S. S. 
Crossman, H. G. Noble, G. M. Codding and H. J. 
Neale, out-did itself in the matter of decorations, 
and entirely eclipsed the efforts of previous years. 
The main scheme of decorations was, as in years 
past, the use of abundant evergreen and bunting. 
The walls of the hall were covered with evergreen 
sprays arranged in solid panels, separated by narrow 
strips of white paper. In the center of each panel 
was placed an incandescent light, covered with a red 
tissue heart-shaped shield, an unique and appropriate 
idea. A promenade was curtained off at the north 
end of the hall by hanging a huge net interwoven with 
hemlock sprays from the beams overhead. This net 
was draped up in the middle to form a passageway to 
the portion of the floor beyond, and in addition bore in 
huge white letters the word "Massachusetts." The 
promenade thus curtained off was furnished with cosy 
corner seats and settles and easy chairs, and lighted 
by a single drop light shielded with a Japanese lantern, 
suspended from a canopy of American flags above. 
The opposite end of the hall represented a still more 
elaborate treatment, the portions of the floor under 
the balcony rail being divided Into little evergreen 
booths by the use of evergreen-interwoven netting, 



each booth completely furnished with rugs, corner- 
seats, and easy chairs. In addition, at this end of 
the hall, the balcony rail bore a constellation of ruby 
lights which took the form of "0 M 9". 

The main floor was left clear for dancing, the pat- 
ronesses' corner being set at the northwest of the floor 
and opposite it the stand for the orchestra, consisting 
of a platform surrounded with a bank of foliage plants, 
and sheltered by a canopy of red and white streamers 
supported by birch poles wound with narrow strips of 
red tissue. In the center of the west side of the hali 
was placed a little booth from which punch was served, 
also constmcted of birch poles and bunting streamers. 
The sides of the floor were banked with palms and foliage 
plants, generously interset with easy chairs and settles. 
The dome of the roof overhead was completely cut off 
by a lateral arrangement of red and white streamers 
of bunting, from which hung the three arc-lights, 
each shielded with a huge Japanese lantern. 

The festivities of the evening were opened at 8 
o'clock with a reception which lasted till 9, those 
receiving being Mrs. K. L. Butterfield, Mrs. G. E. 
Stone, Mrs. P. B. Hasbrouck, Mrs. J. A. Foord, 
Mrs. J. E. Ostrander and Mrs. G. C. Martin. At 
9 o'clock dancing commenced, Derrick's Westfiela 
Orchestra of eight pieces furnishing the music. The 
dancing continued until about 12-30 when refresh- 
ments were served as an intermission, Brown of 
Amherst catering. The refreshments cleared away, 
the couples were grouped at the south end of the hall 
for a flash light picture. Dancing was again in order 
until nearly 4, after which the hacks conveyed the 
young ladies to their various stopping places for a few 
hours rest before the next day's pleasures began. 

Saturday dawned amid a downpour of rain, which 
let up only at rare intervals during the day. As sleigh- 
ing parties had been planned, the prospects of a day 
pleasantly spent were at first rather discouraging, but 
if report has it aright, good times were enjoyed in 
spite of the rain. One party started out late in the 
morning in carriages for South Deerfield, taking 
dinner and enjoying a pleasant afternoon at one of the 
town's famous hotels. Another party took the noon 
train for Belchertown in lieu of a proposed sleighride 
to the same place, took dinner at the hotel, enjoyed a 
little dance in the afternoon, and returned to Amherst 
again In the evening. The next day witnessed the 



parting, and the annual Junior Promenade was again 
an event of the past, full of pleasant associations, 
and never to be forgotten. Those who attended the 
Promenade ; 

M. W. Thompson and Miss Burrill of Boston Nor- 
mal Art School; S. S. Crossman and Miss Ross of 
Houlton, Me.; A. W. Hubbard and Miss Valentine 
of Smith, H. G. Noble and Miss Noble of Springfield; 
R. C. Lindblad and Miss Lindblad of North Grafton; 
H. W. Turner and Miss Burke of Holyoke; H. J. 
Neale and Miss Whitmore of Worcester; H. A. 
Brooks and Miss McGregor of Mount Holyoke ; W. 
W. S. Titus and Miss Smallwood of Mount Holyoke ; 
R. S. Eddy and Miss Martin of Sharon; W. F. 
Hennesy and Miss Burke of Holyoke ; G. M. Cod- 
ding and Miss Culver of Boston Normal Art School ; 
L, S. Corbett and Miss Crossman of Needham ; A. 
J. Farley and Miss Buthr of Smith; G. N. Swain 
and Miss Lee of Amherst; E. G. Bartlett and Miss 
Knowles of Amherst; P. H. Smith and Mrs. P. H. 
Smith; A. J. Wheeldon and Miss Judge of Smith; 
C. F. Alien and Miss Newton of Worcester; 
L. W. Chapman and Miss Shepard of Smith; K. E. 
Gillett and Miss Winn of Mount Holyoke; J. A. 
Hyslop and Miss Hyslop of Rutherford, N. J. ; E. D. 
Philbrick and Miss Cobb of Amherst; F. E. Thurs- 
ton and Miss Legro of Boston; John Noyes and Miss 
Morrison of Amherst; D. J. Caffrey and Miss Davis 
of Gardner, H. R.Allen and Miss Wilcox of Fall 
River ; A. J. Anderson and Miss Kidd of Mount 
Holyoke; A. L. Whiting and Miss Legro of Smith ; 
R. H. Jackson and Miss Bolles of Amherst; Carleton 
Bates and Miss Ellis of Natick ; R. D. Lull and Miss 
Hoyt of Mount Holyoke; R. C. Potter and Miss 
Boutwell of Smith ; W. E. Adams and Miss Adams 
of Chelmsford; E. J. Burke and Miss Murphy of 
Pittsfield; 0. R. Webb and Miss Carlow of Worces- 
ter; W. D. Barlow and Miss Sheldon of Smith ; Dr. 
and Mrs. J. B. Paige; Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Foord, 
President and Mrs. K. L. Butterfield; Dr. and Mrs. 
G. E. Stone; Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Kenney. 



'03. — The work of W. V. Tower, Entomologist 
and Plant Pathologist at the Porto Rico Agricultural 
Experiment Station, has been divided, with Mr. 
Tower retaining the work in entomology. 



ANNUAL BANQUET. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College Club held 
their annual banquet at Young's Hotel, Boston, Friday 
the 31st of January. About seventy-five members were 
present and also President Butterfield and Professors 
Brcoks, Stone and Howard of the faculty. An ex- 
cellent menu was served after which the speakers of 
the evening were introduced by Archie H. Kirkland, 
the president of the club. The first speaker, Mr. 
Robert Lincoln O'Brien of the Boston Jranscn'pt, 
and a journalist of repute, gave a very interesting 
sketch of the presidential possibilities which had pre- 
sented themselves to him in a recent survey of the 
approaching campaign at Washington. 

President Butterfield vas next introduced, and in a 
short pithy speech outlined the needs of the college 
and the necessity for all friends of the college to use 
their influence for beneficial legislation, that our 
budget may be supported, and that building and 
equipment b*: supplied to fill our growing demands. 

Ex-Councillor Rawson. newly elected to the board 
of trustees, showed his interest in the college at this 
early stage and, with such men at the helm, who can 
tell what the future will bring for our Alma Mater ? 

Secretary Ellsworth of the state board of agricul- 
ture and Secretary Martin of the board of education 
also responded during the evening. Professor 
Howard reported on the student athletics and urged 
the alumni to contribute in the support of a football 
coach. The list of last season's victories was dis- 
played conspicuously at one end of the hall and was 
heartily praised by all. 

Previous to the banquet an informal business meet- 
ing was held and the following were elected for the 
ensuing year : President, Franklin W, Davis, '89; 
Secretary, Newton Shultis, '96; Treasurer, Wil- 
liam A. Morse, '82; Directors, Archie H. Kirkland, 
'94; Frederick G. May, '82; Bertram Tupper, '05. 

If a suggestion would be in order it would take the 
form of an appeal to our younger alumni to attend 
these gatherings in larger force, if It Is possible, to 
keep in touch with the old college, and renew that 
spirit of good fellowship and of jolly, rollicking good 
times which student days supplied. Let us be more 
united, the old and the new, and with bared heads 
ring out our " Sons of Old Massachusetts " and with 
a long yell for Massachusetts bring back the college 
days of yore. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE M. A. C. CLUB OF WASHINGTON. 

The annual meeting and dinner of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Club of Washington, D. 
C, was held at the Y. M. C. A. building, Washing- 
ton, Feb. 8, with the following members in attend- 
ance : Dr. E. W. Allen, '85, W. H. Beal, (hon- 
orary), B. F. Burgess, 95; C. B. Lane, '95; W. 
A. Hooker, '99; H. L. Knight, '02 ; F. D. Couden, 
'04, C. H. Griffin, '04, and F. F. Henshaw, '04; 
all of Washington; R. B. Moore, '88, and C. S. 
Crocker, '89 of Philadelphia, and M. H. Pingree, 
'99 of Baltimore. A letter from President Butter- 
field, telling of the notable progress the college is 
making was heard with deep interest and hearty ap- 
proval, following which Toastmaster Moore called for 
remarks by each member In turn. Officers were 
elected as follows: President, C. S. Crocker ; vice- 
presidents, H. L. Knight and W. A. Hooker; secre- 
tary-treasurer, F. D. Couden; choragus, C. H. 
Griffin. 



Alu 



mm. 



79 and '99.— You can find the M. A. C. boys 
everywhere. At the 5th annual meeting of the Ala- 
bama State Horticultural society held In Birming- 
ham, Feb. 13 and 14, an address was put in the pro- 
gram by Prof. S. B. Green of Minnesota, and a 
paper on Fruit Insects by W. E. Hinds. 

76.— Cyrus A. Taft died at his home in Whitins- 
vllle, Feb. 7 of pneumonia. He had been in the 
South all winter where he was participating In the 
golf tournament at Pinehurst, N. C, but came to 
see his brother William L. Taft of Northbridge Cen- 
ter, who was seriously ill, Jan. 29. Mr. Taft was 
born in Whitinsvilie, and was 51 years old. He was 
graduated from Northbridge high school in the class 
of 1872, and In 1876 was graduated from the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, with the degree of B. S. 
'83. — S. M. Holman, who Is again in the legisla- 
ture this year, has also been a tax collector In his 
home town of Attleboro and received this complimen- 
tary paragraph editorially the other day in the Attle- 
boro Sun : "It cannot be said that Tax Collector Sam- 
uel M. Holman has not performed his duties well this 



year, it his annual report published last night is taken 
as an indication. Those who oppose him must have 
other grounds than incompetency." 

'91. Malcolm A. Carpenter, Landscape Gardener 

and Forester, of Cambridge, recently visited college. 

'91. Henry M. Howard, Market Gardener at 

West Newton, visited his Alma Mater during the 
past week. 

'92. — Henry M. Thomson of Thompson, Conn., 
has recently purchased the Flavel Gaylord farm at 
Mill Valley, Amherst. Mr. Thompson was for twelve 
years superintendent of the Experiment Station farm 
at M. A. C. and for several years has been superin- 
tendent of a large estate at Thompson. 

'94. — The following account commending 
work of A. H. Kirkland, M. A. C. '94, In 
against the moth pest, is taken from 
Feb. 7 : 

What Massachusetts is doing toesta^ 
control of the moth pest in this state^ 
of the consensus of opinion amo^ 
class of etomologists and zoologi 
and Europe, that the system cat! 
on except in the small details, 
islature of last year Superintendei 
who has charge of all the work ag? 
pest In this state, was directed to 
and criticism of eminent men in the profesT 
000 being piaced at his disposal to carry out 
The presence in Boston at that time of the 
tional Zoological Congress brought to the city 
all over the world a group of scientific men, among 
whom 14 experts were picked out to pass judgement 
on the parasite work. These experts, accepting the 
commission given to them, made a careful study of 
the situation and have made their Individual reports 
to Superintendent Kirkland. 

All agreed that the work of importing parasites of 
the gypsy and brown-tail moths as conducted by Dr. 
Howard of Washington and Superintendent Kirkland 
is the largest undertaking of its kind ever made in 
the world; that the organization and methods are ihe 
best possible to secure the desired end. The only 
adverse criticisms are that an effort should be made 
also to secure parasites from Japan; that greater 
attention should be given to a technical study of the 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




life history and relations of the parasites ; that the 
questions of fungus and bacterial diseases of the 
moths should be carefully studied. Other suggestions j 
are of minor character, relating to the arrangements | 
and equipments of the laboratories. Some of these 
suggestions had been under consideration for some 
time by the men in charge of the work, but were set 
aside in the first efforts to get the parasites to this 
country and get them to work. Within a few weeks, 
however, some of them will be taken up. 

Last year Superintendent Kirkland had $25,000 
for parasite work but he spent only about $10,000 of 
it. This year he will ask the Legislature for $15,000 
more so as to have $25,000 witn which to conduct 
the work as outlined. It will take some years to 
establish the parasites, and eminent scientists claim 
that it cannot be regarded as discouraging if it took a 
decade to establish a parasitic control of the pest. 
In the three years that the state has experimented 
with parasites it has expended $34,674 upon that exper- 
iment. As might be expected, methods of packing 
nd shipping the insects so that as many as possible 
f them should reach America in living condition was 
ne of the first details to require attention. The 



shipments of 1 
very large amo 
dition and upw; 
daceous beetles 




tie value ; in 1906 a 
rial arrived in good con- 
parasites and 850 pre- 
here alive, and a part of 



them were liberated in Infested districts. 

Ex- '94.— John S. Goodell, son of the late Presi- 
dent H. H. Goodell, who for the past nine years has 
been employed as a civil engineer by the Gulf, Col- 
orado & Santa Fe railroad company has accepted a 
position on the Canton- Hongkong railroad In China. 
He will sail for Canton on Feb. 25. 

'96.— S. W. Fletcher has left Michigan for his 
new position in Virginia, leaving the Department of 
Horticulture in charge of C. P. Halligan, '03, who 
also enjoys a raise of salary with other brightening 
prospects. 

*01.— J. E. Halligan is billed for a talk on fertiliz- 
ers at the annual meeting of the Louisiana Horticul- 
tural society this month, at Minden, La. The big- 
gest and fattest bulletins coming from the Louisiana 
Experiment Station are the work of J. E. Halligan. 
No. 98 on Commercial Feeding Stuffs contains 141 
pages of analysis and discussion. 



TALK 




won't impress you much. 
Even the poorest hats are spoken of well in their own advertisments. 
But if you come in and try on one of OUR HATS-thafs different- 
We have them all : in brown, pearl, gazelle, coco, acme, white or black, 
soft and stiff. 

Every hat we sell is guaranteed to do its duty. 
Spring line ready for inspection. 



ftd«3C Qf&t? S'ISP 

Amherst Houbk Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






THE M. A. C. CLUB OF WASHINGTON. 

The annual meeting and dinner of the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College Club of Washington, D. 
C, was held at the Y. M. C. A. building, Washing- 
ton, Feb. 8, with the following members in attend- 
ance : Dr. E. W. Allen, '85, W. H. Beal, (hon- 
orary), B. F. Burgess, 95; C. B. Lane, '95; W. 
A. Hooker, '99; H. L. Knight, '02; F. D. Couden, 
'04, C. H. Griffin, '04, and F. F. Henshaw, '04; 
all of Washington; R. B.Moore, '88, and C. S. 
Crocker, '89 of Philadelphia, and M. H. Pingree, 
'99 of Baltimore. A letter from President Butter- 
field, telling of the notable progress the college is 
making was heard with deep interest and hearty ap- 
proval, following which Toastmaster Moore called for 
remarks by each member in turn. Officers were 
elected as follows: President, C. S. Crocker ; vice- 
presidents, H. L. Knight and W. A. Hooker; secre- 
tary-treasurer, F. D. Couden; choragus, C. H. 
Griffin. 



Al 



umm, 






79 and '99.— You can find the M. A. C. boys 
everywhere. At the 5th annual meeting of the Ala- 
bama State Horticultural society held in Birming- 
ham, Feb. 13 and 14, an address was put in the pro- 
gram by Prof. S. B. Green of Minnesota, and a 
paper on Fruit Insects by W. E. Hinds. 

76. Cyrus A. Taft died at his home in Whitins- 

ville, Feb. 7 of pneumonia. He had been in the 
South all winter where he was participating in the 
golf tournament at Pinehurst, N. C, but came to 
see his brother William L. Taft of Northbridge Cen- 
ter, who was seriously ill, Jan. 29. Mr. Taft was 
born in Whitinsville. and was 51 years old. He was 
graduated from Northbridge high school in the class 
of 1872, and in 1876 was graduated from the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College, with the degree of B. S. 
'83.— S. M. Holman, who is again in the legisla- 
ture this year, has also been a tax collector in his 
home town of Attleboro and received this complimen- 
tary paragraph editorially the other day in the Attle- 
boro Sun : "It cannot be said that Tax Collector Sam- 
uel M. Holman has not performed his duties well this 



year, it his annual report published last night is taken 
as an indication. Those who oppose him must have 
other grounds than incompetency." 

'91.— Malcolm A. Carpenter, Landscape Gardener 

and Forester, of Cambridge, recently visited college. 

-91. _Henry M. Howard, Market Gardener at 

West Newton, visited his Alma Mater during the 

past week. 

'92. —Henry M. Thomson of Thompson, Conn., 
has recently purchased the Flavel Gaylord farm at 
Mill Valley, Amherst. Mr. Thompson was for twelve 
years superintendent of the Experiment Station farm 
at M. A. C. and for several years has been superin- 
tendent of a large estate at Thompson. 

•94. The following account commending the good 

work of A. H. Kirkland, M. A. C. '94, In his fight 
against the moth pest, is taken from the Republican, 

Feb. 7 : 

What Massachusetts is doing to establish a parasitic 
control of the moth pest in this state has the sanction 
of the consensus of opinion among a representative 
class of etomologists and zoologists from this country 
and Europe, that the system cannot be improved up- 
on except in the small details. By vote of the Leg- 
islature of last year Superintendent A. H. Kirkland, 
who has charge of all the work against the moth 
pest in this state, was directed to seek the counsel 
and criticism of eminent men in the profession, $10,- 
000 being placed at his disposal to carry out the plan. 
The presence in Boston at that time of the Interna- 
tional Zoological Congress brought to the city from 
all over the world a group of scientific men, among 
whom 14 experts were picked out to pass judgement 
on the parasite work. These experts, accepting the 
commission given to them, made a careful study of 
the situation and have made their Individual reports 
to Superintendent Kirkland. 

All agreed that the work of importing parasites of 
the gypsy and brown-tail moths as conducted by Dr. 
Howard of Washington and Superintendent Kirkland 
is the largest undertaking of its kind ever made in 
the world ; that the organization and methods are ihe 
best possible to secure the desired end. The only 
adverse criticisms are that an effort should be made 
also to secure parasites from Japan; that greater 
attention should be given to a technical study of the 



life history and relations of the parasites ; that the 
questions of fungus and bacterial diseases of the 
moths should be carefully studied. Other suggestions 
are of minor character, relating to the arrangements 
and equipments of the laboratories. Some of these 
suggestions had been under consideration for some 
time by the men in charge of the work, but were set 
aside in the first efforts to get the parasites to this 
country and get them to work. Within a few weeks, 
however, some of them will be taken up. 

Last year Superintendent Kirkland had $25,000 
for parasite work but he spent only about $10,000 of 
it. This year he will ask the Legislature for $15,000 
more so as to have $25,000 with which to conduct 
the work as outlined. It will take some years to 
establish the parasites, and eminent scientists r.laim 
that it cannot be regarded as discouraging if it took a 
decade to establish a parasitic control of the pest. 
In the three years that the state has experimented 
with parasites it has expended $34,674 upon that exper- 
iment. As might be expected, methods of packing 
and shipping the insects so that as many as possible 
of them should reach America in living condition was 
one of the first details to require attention. The 



shipments of 1905 were of little value; in 1906 a 
very large amount of material arrived in good con- 
dition and upward of 54 ,200 parasites and 850 pre- 
daceous beetles reached here alive, and a part of 
them were liberated in infested districts. 

E x -'94.— John S. Goodell, son of the late Presi- 
dent H. H. Goodell, who for the past nine years has 
been employed as a civil engineer by the Gulf. Col- 
orado & Santa Fe railroad company has accepted a 
position on the Canton- Hongkong railroad in China. 
He will sail for Canton on Feb. 25. 

'96. — S. W. Fletcher has left Michigan for his 
new position in Virginia, leaving the Department of 
Horticulture in charge of C. P. Halligan, '03, who 
also enjoys a raise of salary with other brightening 
prospects. 

'01. — J. E. Halligan is billed for I talk on fertiliz- 
ers at the annual meeting of the Louisiana Horticul- 
tural society this month, at Minden, La. The big- 
gest and fattest bulletins coming from the Louisiana 
Experiment Station are the work of J. E. Halligan. 
No. 98 on Commercial Feeding Stuffs contains 141 
pages of analysis and discussion. 



TALK 



won't impress you much. 
Even the poorest hats are spoken of well in their own advertisments. 
But if you come in and try on one of OUR HATS— that's different- 
We have them all : in brown, pearl, gazelle, coco, acme, white or black, 
soft and stiff. 

Every hat we sell is guaranteed to do its duty. 
Spring line ready for inspection. 

fewc &°TH e? Sksp 

"*M»ys Wclcome-bi)y or i)of 
Amherst House Block. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANS1NQ, MICHIGAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT course: men 
I place buttermakerrs, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 7 


A. m. to 8 


P. M. 


Tuesdays 7 


6 


N 


Wednesdays, 7 


8 


M 


Thursdays, 7 


6 


it 


Fridays, 7 


8 


it 


Saturdays, 7 


M 11 


M 



I. M. LABROVITZ, 

CUSTOM TAILOR. 

GENTLEMEN'S GARMENTS TO ORDER. 

ALSO 

Dying % C leanings Pressing, and Repairing. 



All orders promptly attended to. 

Drop me a postal und I will call on you. 

jy Kull Dress Suits to rent. 0^-students' Clothes bought. 

11 Amity Street, Amhkrst, Mass. 



GOODS FOR MEN 




C. & K. DiiRBEY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONF1HED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets. Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, M,\s> 



Rabar's 3tin t 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Old South Street, off Main, 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

'.'7 Main St., Northampton 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open everyday. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for 1U excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. u. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAIfUFACTURKK oh 

80DA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon ami German Tonic, Birch Beer ami Uln^er 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



ill via Street, 



NOBTHAMKTOK. MASS 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

Hhs n-ceived tin- latent fabric* for the *pi inn sml summer 
trade of '07 in Genii. men. > liniment*. Also 40M Ladies' 
Garments In a satisfaetory Bttltt. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Pretwing promptly done. 

jgp-Military Work a Specialty .^CJ 
Under the l'oat Office, - - Amhkkst, Mass. 



OUR IGE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUp toDad . 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teums, Frater- 
nity itutl Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE l'KK'ES. 

D. II. KENDliWK, Proprietor. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

IVl.A.O. A»x«t. H.M.JENNISOIV.'OH 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work Uken Monday delivered Thursday. 
•• " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

I^rSATIBFAOTION OUARANTBBD. * 'r* 
M. A. VTLtCr, Manmgrr. 

< 11 nca : 
East n©asa,n.t Street. 



M. A. C. 82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT TMK 



COLLEGE STOKE. 

The. Children are Happy. 
Because their clothes sre ma<le <>n the Nkw Home Sewino 
Mac mink which fact, aaaarei them ot no "rlpst." Mothers 
shouldn't one at once as It will «lo for their children In yesr* 
to come. Dealers Ever> -where. 















THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLKTK LINK OK GOODS 
8U1TKD TO THE STUDENTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Bugs, etc., etc. 



ESTABLISHED 1851. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lmvest Prices. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NKW YOBK. 

IMPORTERS AND M ANUKACTUEKKB <>K 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Bow, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



'BILL' 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Booms with Bath 81.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

If. A. C. TRADE. 

IS Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKEKV 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKEB & CO. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 






AnHast , Aa$$. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 
OOTLlftt BLOCK, AMliKHST, mass 



O. S. GATES, 13.13.S. 

DEIMTALi ROOMS, 

CUTLER'S BLOCK. AMHERST, MA88 



Gowticyt Valley Street Railway Go. 

AMHKHHT IHVIHHW. 

Can, will leave Aiuherxt ami Northampton on the hour and 
halt lioui Mom « .30 a. M. till Ht.ao p. u. Sundays the nr»t car 
will leuve at X.3CA.M. 

Main OKric-K, (.hkknuki.i*, Mam. 

John A.Tii|t|(art, Supt. 
NORTHAMPTON OlTICI, U« MAIN ST. 

C. W.Clapp, An«t Supt. Telephone, Northampton, 1*6 IS. 



E. B. DICKINSON, B. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, • - - AMHERST, MASS. 

office Hour*: 
e to la a.- m., l-ao to b i»- xa. 
Ether and Nitrooa Oxide Ga» adminlntered when dealred. 



HURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Psot Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Are you in need of a 

Dress JStiirt? 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To tar. your aole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

opposite Town Ham.. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherrt. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

CORRECTED TO JAN. 1, 1808. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 



SELLS 



GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



SOUTH BOUND 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. *., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



I 

■ 



I 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT OF I*II»IJVI$»SU 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefit! of this on nursery orders this 
spring. 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 




Akthcr E. I)okk. 



L. H. ToUKTKLOTTE. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AND JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, ANO VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Free/ers 

Corner North and Union St<*., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MA8S 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Malu Street. - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CMS. H. ELLIOTT CO. 




THK LAMM* tttrliUrBf KMiKAV- 
DM BOOM IN THK WORLD. 

Works: 11th Street & Lehigh Ave. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA, 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

( -IIASES, BARN. NKAK KX PRESS nil ICE. 
Telephone Connection. AEHERST, MASS 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 

Class and Fraternity Insert* for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery. Menus. 

Claws Pins and Medals, 

(Writ,.- for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior 11 all-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College 



J. H.TROTT 



PLulBEB. STEAM 4 60S FITTER, 

AND DEALER III STOVES AND BRUGES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-u. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 

It is 1 Natural Manure. 

ijrows Strong, Vtger&U, Jl> <tUhy Plant* That £**M Wm Ml 
i>r. OKOBOI K. stiink ProfMMrof Botanj at tin- Mm.-» 
Agricultural College, and Profeeaoi ol 1'imii Dlaeatee at Mm 
Hutch Kxpertincnt Station, A 111 1hti-i , Mil**., write* to our 
Agricultural Expert in- follows: 

" I will nay tliat I IHTaMW tilt forinula which you 

tireparad tor Mr. Preaeott and applied i>> bits oa ln- 
iciih vne Tery effectual In controlling the MparagM 
ru»t. Tin- application ol your (oriuula and other Cm 
tnree which were carrlod onl In the management ol 
these bad a convince me that it constituted the heat 
ilemon trntion ol the control of axpar»gu>- rm-t which 
nan ever b e— Blade in till-, country." 
(iKNCINK PKRl'VlAN UUAVO formed the baatt* of the 
abov* mentioned (omnia, it wne need on tne aaparaan* node 
of C. W. Pkkbcott., < oncord, Miiatt., the lance* t Individual 
growerof AMparagu* In New Kngland We tOsn offer 

wk also am 
Nitrate of Soda. Basic Staff, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 
at Lowest Prices. 

v\ ■ distribute fertilizing material* from New York, ■•anon, 

Ma**., ami Charleston, S. C. 

our beautifully illustrated *0 page hook on " Plant Km id 

Problems, " la sent free of charge. 

THE CO E- MORTIMER CO., 

sole Importer* for I' . *. of genuine IVrmlnii (iniiiio, and 
Ma 11 11 fact u rem of High (Jrade Fertilizers. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 
the- best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. T hey 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Hall, Foot 
Hall. Basket Ball, 
KunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
mil trademark means something. 

■d tot our Catalogue It M free to any address. 

WRIGHT «ft i>rr«oiv 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 
a WES1 JSW SI.. M'.W VOKK 

PaoviDBRi ft, K. I. tAMBaiofiE. Mass. 




Cm 



" For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 






HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Klse. 



K. A. THOMPSON, 

Kear First National Bank. AMHKKSI 




Caps and Gowns 

MAKERS TO 1906 CUSS. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av , Nkw York. 













Massachusetts 
agricultural 

Golleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



I. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 



(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 11 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



I 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 11. 1908 







• 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
Ail the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR „ PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 



E. E. MILLET 1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, IHAHDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 




OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



GO TO 

page's SDoc Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 






Deuel's Drug Store. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 

W. R. BROWN 
Savings Hank Block, . AMHERST. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS., MARCH 11. 1908 



NO. II 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and Alumni are requested to contribute Communication, should be addressed. Cou.aos Sio»al. Ahhmst. Mass Tms S.okal will be 
sent to all subscriber, until it. di.continu.nce i. ordered and arrears are paid. SubKriber.wh.de not receire their paper regularly are requested te 

notify the Business Manager. — — 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

D. P. MILLER. 1908. Editor-in-Chief. 

R. H. VERBECK. 1908. Business Manager 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Assistant Ed'tor. 

O. B. BR1CCS. I 909. Assistant Business Manager 
O. L. CLARK, 1908. Department Notes. W. E. ADAMS. 1909. Alumni Notes 

J. R. PARKER. 1908, Athletic. E - F - DAMON. 1910. 

H T WHEELER. 1 908, College Notes. W.R.CLARK. 1910. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Special. 



Term*. $1.00 per uesr in adcance Sing)* Captna, 10c. Postage outside o» United 



and 



Athletic Association. 
Foot-Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association. 
Base Bail Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. Fraternity Conference 

M. W. Thompson. Manager 
H. M. Jennison. Manager 
S. S. Crossman. Manager. 
College Senate, 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indei 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President 



J. R.Parker . Pres. 
R. D. Lul'. Manager 
C. H. White. Pras. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second -das. matter. Past Office at Amherst. 




With this issue of the Signal the old board closes 
its year's work, and passes along to others the duty 
and privilege of representing the college, and particu- 
larly the student body, through the columns of a col- 
lege publication. The duties of the past year have, 
on the whole, been pleasant to perform, though not 
without accompanying unpleasant responsibilities. 
The editor has been obliged to bear the brunt of criti- 
cism, most of it coming either openly or in a round- 
about way from members of the faculty. That any 
of these should ever have doubted his sincerity of 
purpose is a cause of keen regret. The one thing 
which seems to cause so much trouble in this rough- 
and-tumble existence of ours is a lack of appreciation 
and respect for one-another's point of view. If every 
one thought and acted sincerely, and gave the next 
man credit for doing the same, we should soon real- 
ize our dream of heaven on earth. Shall we ever 
reach that stage of development where we shall rec- 



ognize that what is truth to some may be error to 
others, and make our allowances accordingly ? That 
you and I differ in our opinions does not necessarily 
point to the conclusion that either one or the other of 
us is a fool, else a rogue. What about this square - 
deal business which sounds so nice, and looks good on 
paper, but which is so hard to realize In actual life ? 
Is each of us doing his share in the bargain — or was 
the bargain merely an ephemeral vision ? When 
student trusts student and faculty, and when faculty 
trusts student— yes, and faculty, too— we shall begin 
to get a glimmering of happy days which no number 
of College Unions and other social functions can ever 
accomplish under present conditions. We have 
boasted of our college spirit— it is rotten today, a 
shame which must diffuse every honest M. A. C. 
man's cheek with hot blood. Student disruptions 
have followed unpleasant relations with faculty. The 
spirit of mutual confidence of a year ago is null. 
Who is to blame ? We are none of us free from 
guilt. It is high time that everybody concerned took 
a brace, threw aside yesterday's prejudices, smiled 






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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



on the future, and passed the good cheer along to the 
next man. Come, now, are you any more deeply 
offended than the rest of us that you should hang 
back? 

But what a digression ! The editor has endeavored 
during the past year to express the best sentiment of 
the student body — to make the Signal fairly repre- 
sentative. And if he is any student of human 
motives and their interpretation, he is justified in 
claiming that that representation has been fairly 
accomplished. The members of the board, and par- 
ticularly the seniors, have stood ready to help and 
lend their judgment. If the Signal has achieved any 
small success during the year, the honor is to those 
who have stood ready and faithful in the performance 
of their several duties. 

There is one thing which the Signal Board of 
1907-1908 set out to accomplish which yet remains 
unachieved — and in that we are no more unfortunate 
than have been preceeding Signal boards. We 
refer to the effort made early in the fall to secure the 
recognition of the faculty, or at least of the English 
Department, of work done by the members of the 
Signal Board — a recognition which should be in 
keeping with that accorded to other student activities. 
The editor gave some space in a fall issue to a dis- 
cussion of the questions of credit for Signal work, and 
excuse from absences necessitated from the perform- 
ance of editorial and business duties. The editor 
hoped, perhaps not unreasonably, that such a forceful 
presentation of the case would meet with some 
response, either one way or another, from the dean of 
the college (as one whose duties are largely involved 
with questions conaerning student problems,) but 
after six weeks silence from that office the editor 
decided to fore* the issue, so arranged for an inter- 
view with the dean, which was generously enough 
accorded. Meanwhile, several members of the fac- 
ulty had expressed their views as according with the 
object which the Signal Board was endeavoring to 
accomplish. The interview with the dean resulted in 
a perfect understanding of the proposition, and the 
editor was encouraged to believe that something 
could and would be done about it, it being stated that 
the various phases of the question would have to be 
submitted to various committees of the faculty. On 
the whole, the editor's point of view was so courte- 



ously received that he was led in the next issue of the 
Signal to comment again upon the question, saying 
that the co-operation of the faculty might be expected 
in a way which should tend materially to increase the 
incentive to strive for honors upon the editorial staff 
of the college paper. Then came a period of patient 
waiting for developments, a period which has dragged 
out interminably, and which still extends into the 
obscure future. In other words, the question seems 
to have suffered the usual fate — it still is a question. 
It is not unreasonable to suppose that we might have 
expected more— at least a frank statement of what 
was being done. The editor requested the privilege 
of presenting his own case to the committee, and was 
granted the privilege, but apparently the committee 
never met, for the editor was never summoned to a 
hearing. If the members of the faculty have taken 
any action in the matter, the endeavor seems to be 
to keep the members of the Signal Board in profound 
ignorance of the fact. 

So, then, the new board has the same problem to 
meet which has proved a stumbling-block to the 
board in years past — a lack of sympathy, which 
should best express itself in action from those who 
might best encourage the work of the college paper. 
The board can exist and do its work creditably with- 
out that sympathy, but never will it attain that suc- 
cess which might accrue to its labors were they but 
recognized as a part, and a valuable part, of a college 
training. Tne editors of the college paper, and par- 
ticularly the editor-in-chief, must make heavy sacri- 
fices of time and of collegiate standing in the right 
performance of their duties, and we who are ambi 
tious to do some original investigation and study feel 
keener yet the sacrifice. And, withal, after it is all 
over with, we have not even a coveted letter to show 
f or it — just a howl from a few hard-hit critics, and a 
low standing in our collegiate work. The system is 
wrong. But who can rectify it if the faculty will not? 



Professor Hart delivered an address before the 
Second Annual New England Conference on Rural 
Progress held in Boston Thursday and Friday of last 
week, his subject being "Elementary Agriculture as a 
subject of study in the grades. ' ' President Butterfield 
also had a prominent part in the conference, being 
one of the committee in charge. 



Athletic Notts- 

BASKETBALL. 

Vermont, 28; M. A. C, 9. 

The fast University of Vermont basketball team 
defeated Massachusetts in an interesting game Feb. 
27, by a score of 28 to 9. The game was played in 
the drill-hall and with the exception of the Holy 
Cross game was the only one we lost on the home floor 
this season. The home team played a strong aggres- 
sive game but Vermont was faster and was always in 
the lead. The game opened with both sides covering 
closely and It was five minutes before either side 
scored. Watkins of Vermont then started the scor- 
ing by getting two baskets in rapid succession. In all 
Vermont secured five basket* in this half while all 
Massachusetts could get was one basket by Daniels. 
In the second half the playing on both sides was 
faster and the blocking harder but Vermont still kept 
the lead. Towards the end of the half Cobb made a 
wonderful basket, shooting the ball from the center of 
the floor, over a high rafter and through the basket. 
It was one of the most spectacular plays ever exe- 
cuted in the drill-hall Captain Watkins played a star 
game for Vermont, getting five baskets and giving a 
clever exhibition of blocking, dodging and passing. 
Buck was a close second in the scoring, getting four 
baskets. 

A hotly contested preliminary game was played 
between the second team and the Northampton 
Commercial College, the second team winning out 
by a score of 17 to 12. 

The line-up : — 

VERMONT. M. A. C. 

Watkins. 1. f. r. g.. Willis, Neale 

Pacquet, r. f. 1. g.. Regan 

Dodge, c. c Daniels 

Holcomb. 1. g. r. f., Cobb 

Buck (Howard), r. g. I. f.. Burke 

Score— Vermont 28. M A. C. 9. Goals from floor— Watkins 
5. Buck 4, Burke 2. Dodge 2. Cobb. Daniels. Howard. Hol- 
comb. Pacquet. Goal from foul — Cobb. Referee— Henry. 
Timer — Jacobs. Time — 20-minute halves. 

M. A. C, 38; Worcester "Tech," 23. 
Worcester "Tech" was defeated at basketball in 
the drill-hall on the evening of Feb. 29. The home 



team started the game with a rush and secured 24 
points In the first half against 9 points for Worces- 
ter, a lead which "Tech" could not overcome in the 
second half. Cobb and Neale got four baskets each 
for Massachusetts Agricultural College in this half, 
and Atherton got all four of the baskets scored by 
"Tech." In the second half "Tech" put up a much 
faster game and kept the scoring to a tie, each side 
getting a total of 14 points. In the middle of the 
half Willis replaced Neale as right guard and a little 
later Johnson was put In as center in place of Daniels. 
Every man on the M. A. C. team put up a splendid 
game, and all scored at least one basket. Cobb and 
Neale both had a great eye for the basket. Cobb 
getting seven and Neale six. Regan put up a stiff 
blocking game, passed well, and scored a clean basket 
in a difficult try. For Worcester Atherton was high 
scorer, getting five baskets. Lawley played a good 
game at center and was good at shooting goals from 
fouls. 

The line-up: — 

WORCESTER TECH. 



M. A. C 

Burke. 1. f. 
Cobb. r. f. 
Daniels. Johnson, c. 
Regan, 1. g. 
Neale. Willis, r. g. 



r. g., Wholean 

1. g., Atherton 

c, Lawley 

r. f., Pease 

I. f., Fitzpatrick 



Score— M. A. C. 38. Worcester Tech. 23. Goals from 
floor— Cobb 7. Burke 3. Daniels. Regan. Neale 6, Willis. 
Atherton 5, Wholean 2. Lawley 2. Fitzpatrick. Goals from 
fouls— Lawley 3. Referee— Henry of Amherst. Timer- 
Hayes. Time — 20-minute halves. 

M. A. C, 13; S. T. S.. 10. 
M. A. C. turned the tables on the Training School 
last Wednesday, winning by a score of 13 — 10. As 
in the previous game with Springfield, Massachusetts 
was greatly handicapped by being obliged to pla> 
under Y. M. C. A. rules, but in spite of repeated 
fouling due to unfamillarity with the rules, the college 
team by superior passing and team work pulled out 
with the victory. 

The game started out at a rapid pace, both teams 
covering closely and allowing but few tries at the 
basket. Messer of Springfield started the scoring on 
a free try from a foul. Right after the next toss-up 
Cobb came down the floor, secured the ball on a 
good pass and scored the first basket for Massachu- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 







setts. Soon after Messer again scored for the Train- 
ing School. Regan scored a pretty basket on a long 
shot and Cobb scored his second basket for M. A. C, 
while Springfield was only able to score on numerous 
free tries from fouls, seven fouls being called on 
Massachusetts in this half. The half ended with the 
score 8-6 in favor of M. A. C. 

Both teams came back on the aggressive in the 
second half, putting up an exhibition of fast basketball, 
which caused excitement to run high. After about 
five minutes of close covering on both sides Neale 
scored a goal from the floor and Cobb followed with a 
goal from a free try. Messer caged two for Spring- 
field from free tries and Miller made another from 
the floor. With score standing 1 1- 10, the playing 
continued hard and fast several minutes, with neither 
side scoring. Regan finally clinched the game by 
getting a basket on a difficult shot, while closely 
guarded. There was no more scoring. Messer and 
Miller excelled for the Training School, while Cobb. 
Burke, and Regan carried off the honors for 
Massachusetts. 

The line-up: — 

S. T. S. 

Burke (capt). I. i. r. g. Miller 

Cobb. r. f L «•• Baile y- Rlce 

Daniels, c. c - ™" ,e " 

Regan. I. g. r ' f " McCullock 

Neale , ,. g . 1. f., Messer (capt) 

Score— M. A. C. 13. S. T. S. 10. Goals from field— Cobb 
2. Regan 2. Neale. Messer. Miller. Goals from fouls- 
Messer 6, Cobb 2. Burke. Referee— Chapman of M. A. C. 
Umpire— Briggs of Springfield. Time-15-minute halves. 
Attendance — 300. 

1 he basketball season closed Friday when Tufts 
was played at Medford. While the season was not 
as successful as might be wished for and more games 
lost than won yet the team as a whole is to be com- 
mended for its work. 

The team had for a nucleus the two forwards of 
last year, Cobb and Burke, and Captain Gillett at 
center. Cutter, '07, and Chase, ex- 1 10, last year's 
guards were missing but good substitutes were found 
for them in Regan, Willis, Farley. Neale, Johnson, 
Shattuck. and Whitmarsh. Regan and Neale played 
nearly every game throughout the season, the former 
being especially strong at blocking and the latter hav- 
ing a good eye for the basket. After the resignation 
of Captain Gillette in mid season, Burke was elected 



captain, and Daniels was placed at center. This was 
Daniels' first year at the game and while he played 
well he lacked the ability and experience of Gillett. 
His work has improved steadily throughout the 
season and he will prove a valuable man for next 
year's team. Of the fine work of the forwards very 
little need be said. Both played strong, fast games, 
dribbling, shooting and passing like the experts that 
they are. Captain Burke is to be especially com- 
mended for the hard conscientious work he has done 
in drilling the team. Manager Jennison gave the 
college the best arranged basketball schedule it has 
ever had, bringing a number of the best college teams 
in New England to play In the drill-hall. To him 
also belongs the credit of carrying the season through 
to a finish in spite of discouragements which seemed 
at one time to make it almost necessary to quit. 
Following is a summary of the games : 
Massachusetts. 1 1 ; University of Vermont, 

Massachusetts, 16; University of St. Lawrence. 

Massachusetts, 5; Potsdam Normal, 

Massachusetts, 4; Holy Cross, 

Massschusetts, 32 ; Rhode Island. 

Massachusetts. 1 1 ; Gardner. 

Massachusetts, 16; Tufts, 

Massachusetts, 14: Dartmouth, 

Massachusetts, 7: Springfield Training School. 

Massachusetts, 3; Williams, 

Massachusetts. 7 ; Holy Cross. 

Massachusetts. 9; University of Vermont. 

Massachusetts. 38; W. P. I., 

Massachusetts, 13; Springfield Training School, 

Massachusetts, 13; Tufts, 



College No**S- 



22 

32 

28 

51 

14 

44 

15 

34 

34 

60 

16 

28 

23 

10 

23 



SIGNAL ELECTIONS. 

The call for candidates for positions upon the Signal 
Board resulted in the following men qualifying : 1909, 
R.C.Potter; 1910, W. C. Johnson, J. C. Folsom. S. 
W.Mendum,M.S.Hazen. L.C. Brown, F.T.Hayn<is, 
H. A. Brooks ; 191 1. S. R. Parsons, A. H. Sharpe. 
R. N. Hallowell. The seniors of the present board 
(which goes out of office today) balloted upon these 
names, choosing the following men: R. C. Potter 
1909. H. A. Brooks and L. C. Brown 1910, S. R 
Parsons and R. N. Hallowell 1911. The new board 
has organized with H. L.White. 1909, editor-in-chief 
and O. B. Briggs, 1909. as manager. 



The vesper services March 1 were conducted by 
Rev. J. G. Nichols of South Hadley. 

The meeting of the Y. M. C. A. Feb. 27 was 
conducted by Dr. Charles Wellington. 

The Catalog of 1908-1909 has been issued. 
Copies may be obtained at the President's office. 

President Creeland of the Ontario Agricultural Col- 
lege, who was to address the Assembly March 4. was 
unable to come to Amherst. 

Those who attended the vesper services March 8 
were fortunate in hearing an excellent talk by Rev. 
Samuel A. Elliot of Boston. 

Professor Waugh lectured Wednesday evening, 
March 4 in the lecture course of the Waltham Edu- 
cation Society, speaking on -'The Fine Art of 

Gardening." 

Professor White lectured Friday evening. March 6. 
for the Amherst Grange, showing a fine collection of 
lantern slides illustrating ornamental gardening and 
garden materials. 

President K. L. Butterfield spoke Saturday, March 
7, before the Massachusetts Horticultural Society at 
Boston, his subject being -'Agricultural Education 
in the Public Schools." 

An Informal Dance was held in the Drill-hall Sat- 
urday night, March 7, which, according to all reports, 
was a great success. A full report of the affair will 
be reserved for a future issue. 

The student body are generally rejoiced at the 
announcement that, by special request of President 
Butterfield, the War Department has extended Cap- 
tain George Martin's detail to the college one year. 

The Assembly. Feb. 26, was given over to Dean 
Mills, who gave an interesting talk on Princeton 
University, its traditions, and some of the educational 
systems practised there, notably the preceptorial 
system. 

The sophomore class has chosen the following com- 
mittee to make arrangements for the sophomore- 
senior reception in June: R. H. Allen, chairman; L. 
S. Dickinson, E. J. Burke, H. A. Brooks, R. S. 
Waldron, C. H. Turner, W. C. Leonard. W. S. Titus 
and L. Brandt. 



ALUMNI REUNION. 

The Seventh Annual Meeting and Banquet of the 
Connecticut Valley Association of Massachusetts 
Agricultural college Alumni was held at the Draper 
Hotel, Northampton, Friday evening, Feb. 21st. at 
seven o'clock. Members of the local alumni asso- 
ciation were also present to enjoy the festivities of the 
evening. Because of the numerous banners that 
were displayed on the walls of the dining-room the 
fact could not be mistaken that the gathering was one 
of loyal ' ' Massachusetts "men. Music was furnished 
during the banquet by the college orchestra and glee 
club. The toastmaster of the evening was Judge 
Lyman, '71 of Northampton who after a few appro- 
priate remarks called upon H. D. Hemenway who 
read an encouraging report on " Athletics at M. A. 
C," prepared by Professor S. F. Howard, who 
was unable to be present. Dean Mills, being the next 
speaker, made remarks on the prosperity and the grow- 
ing popularity of M. AC, and said that the college 
held a higher position in the eye of the people of the 
state than ever before. As head of the department 
of Humanities the Dean emphasized the importance 
of cultural subjects in a curriculum of vocational 
education. He said that as important as it was to get 
a " living ' ' we must not forget the " life. " 

The college song was then rendered by the musical 
clubs and the long yell given for the alumni. Presi- 
dent Butterfield was then called upon and responded 
In his pleasing manner, speaking in an optimistic 
vein concerning the prospects of M. A. C. 

After listening with much pleasure to the former 
speakers, who are men interested in peace, Capt. 
George C. Martin. Capt. 18th U. S. Infantry and 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics at M. A. C. 
was introduced as the last speaker of the evening. 
Capt. Martin, who has had several years of military 
service in the Philippines, spoke In an interesting and 
instructive way as to his experience on those Islands 
Capt. Martin told of the various degrees of civiliza- 
tion found among the natives showing how exceedingly 
barbarous and ignorant a greater portion of the 
Philippinos are. The Captain remarked that the 
" negro question " was not settled yet and that he did 
not think that the time had come when freedom should 
be granted to a people ninety per cent, of whom were 
barbarous or at most only semi-clvlllzed. Captain 



i 

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THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 









Martin believes that the man in this country who 
understands the Philippino best is Secretary Taft. 



BIBLE STUDY. 

The course in Bible study taken up this winter in 
the college, with Professor Jenks' "Political and 
Social Significance of the Teachings of Jesus " as a 
text-book, has progressed about half way toward com- 
pletion. It is proving a valuable course to those who 
are attending regularly, and a number of students are 
appreciating the wholesome value of the weekly dis- 
cussions upon important social questions. The 
present course is one that has proved eminently suc- 
cessful in a number of the colleges of our country, 
and we believe that the course, when closed up in 
April, will have proved successful here. Yet, right 
here in the middle of the course, the Bible Study 
Committee feels that the proposition is worth putting 
up to the students again. The purpose all along has 
been to present this proposition in such a way that the 
value of the course itself would be the main appeal to 
the students to take up with it. This value re- 
mains unchanged. There are many students who 
are deriving it. There are many more who might. 
The course is one well suited to entering upon at any 
time by reason of the plan of the text-book used. 
Each study contains some important social phase of 
life than can be discussed to advantage entirely apart 
from its relative order in the book, and the study of 
these social questions constitutes the main interest of 
the course, and an interest which should appeal to all. 



CALENDAR. 

Mar. 1 1 . Assembly— E. C. Mercer of New York 
City. 

Mar. 14, College Supper. Draper Hall. 6-00 p. m. 
Dr. Charles Eastman. 

Mar. 15, Vespers at 5-00— Rev. F. L. Goodspeed 
of Springfield. 

Mar. 17, Stockbridge Club— E. N. Foote of North- 
ampton. 

Mar. 18. Assembly, 1-30— Mr. Edwin D. Mead of 
Boston. 

Mar. 22, Vespers at 5-00— Sec. F. H. Willis of the 
Worcester, Mass., Y. M. C. A. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

HISTORICAL SKETCHES, BY F. H. FOWLER '87 

5. The College Located. 
His Excellency Governor Andrew in his inaugural 
address in Jan. 1863. stated that he felt that the Act 
of Congress did not make provision sufficient for an 
agricultural school of the highest class in each State, 
neither did he think it possible to find, disconnected 
from colleges and universities, as many men of high 
talent, and otherwise competent, as would be required 
to fill the chairs of one such school. It apparently 
seemed to him wiser, under the circumstances, to 
make use of the projected Bussey Institution, and 
other agencies, rather than to attempt to establish an 
independent institution. 

The Legislature having declined to unite the pro- 
posed college with any existing institution and having 
incorporated the trustees of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, by an act approved April 29. 1863, 
it became the province of these trustees to fix upon a 
suitable location for the new college. They held their 
first meeting in the office of the State Board of Agri- 
culture, in Boston, Nov. 18, 1863, and organized 
with the choice of Governor Andrew as president, 
Allen W. Dodge as vice-president and Charles L. 
Flint as secretary. A set of by-laws was adopted, 
and a committee was chosen to have in charge the 
raising of subscriptions to the funds required by law to 
put the college in operation ; and to consider the sub- 
ject of a location for the college and to receive pro- 
posals concerning the same. 

By the act of incorporation one-tenth part of all the 
moneys received by the State Treasurer, from the 
sale of land scrip, was to be paid to the college, and 
appropriated towards the purchase of a site or farm, 
provided the college should first secure by valid sub- 
scriptions or otherwise, the further sum of $75000, 
for the purpose of erecting suitable buildings thereon ; 
and upon satisfactory evidence that this proviso had 
been complied with, the governor was authorized, 
from time to time, to draw his warrants therefor. 

By the act providing for the reception of a grant 
from Congress, the governor was authorized and 
instructed to appoint a commissioner, whose duty it 
was to locate, without unnecessary delay, all the land 



scrip which might come into the possession of the 
Commonwealth by virtue of the act. and to sell the 
same from time to time, on such terms as the gov- 
ernor and council should determine. Through an 
inadvertence there was no valid provision for convert 
ing the scrip into money until the passage of the legis- 
lative act of May 1 1. 1864. which authorized the sale 
of the scrip instead of its location. This Act (Acts 
of 1864, Chapter 223) also changed the corporate 
name to "The Massachusetts Agricultural College" 
and provided that the location, plan of organization, 
government and course of study, prescribed for said 
college, should be subject to the approval of the gov- 
ernor and council instead of the Legislature. 

Between the dates of Jan. 5th and May 25th. 1864, 
the trustees received and considered various proposi- 
tions for a location, and appointed a committee to 
visit the Agricultural College of Pennsylvania. 
Briefly stated the several propositions were as 
follows : — 

A Mrs. Cary proposed to give her farm in Lexing- 
ton for the purposes of the college ; citizens of North- 
ampton stated that the townspeople there manifested 
a strong desire to have the trustees take charge of 
and manage the fund left for the purposes of an agri- 
cultural school by Oliver Smith and that in addition 
$50,000 had been subscribed and $75,000 could be 
raised, and that all desirable facilities would be 
afforded for a location there; Amherst offered to give 
$50,000 and Amherst College offered the use of its 
collections, chapel, library, etc. ; Springfield offered 
$75,000 together with the use of Hampden Park In 
case it should be thought best to locate in that town ; 
that if the trustees should see fit to locate in Chicopee 
the $75,000 would be raised there ; a proposition sug- 
gested locating in South Lancaster ; and President 
Hill of Harvard expressed the opinion that it would be 
a great mistake in the trustees not to avail themselves 
of the Bussey property. 

On the evening of April 25th the trustees met in 
Springfield and discussed what should be the objects 
of the school or college. On the following morning 
they visited the farm of Trustee Stedman in Chicopee 
and the farm adjoining owned by Chester W. Chapin, 
then that of L. B. Chapin in the same town. Cross- 
ing the river the Kent farm and the Luddington farm 
in West Springfield were carefully examined, when 



return was made to Springfield and the evening spent 
in free exchange of opinion. The following morning 
the trustees went to Northampton and examined the 
Dr. Denniston estate, the Fairbanks farm, a tract of 
land owned by a Mr. Clark near Florence Village, 
also the Day farm and the farm of Dr. Prince. The 
evening was spent in a meeting for a general inter- 
change of sentiments between the trustees and the 
citizens of Northampton, many of whom were present. 
The next morning the trustees visited Amherst and 
examined the farm of Mr. Cobb, Mr. Cowles, and 
others. A meeting was held at the hotel in the after- 
noon, when Hon. Edward Dickinson. President 
Stearns and others stated the claims which the town 
pre sented for the location of the agricultural college 
there. A visit was then made to Amherst College to 
view the cabinets, laboratory, gymnasium, etc. On 
May 3rd a committee of the trustees visited the Cary 
farm in Lexington, and adjoining estates which could 
be had for the purpose ; also the Winchester farm in 
West Newton. 

On May 25th, in Boston, the trustees voted to take 
an Informal ballot on location, the name of the town 
to be stated on the ballot. The result was : Amherst. 
8; West Springfield, 3; Lexington. I ; Northampton. 
I. On a formal ballot, the result stood: Amherst, 
10; Northampton, 3; West Springfield, I. It was 
then voted that Amherst be declared to be the 
unanimous choice of the trustees provided a requisite 
amount of land could be obtained at satisfactory 
prices. At this meeting an executive committee was 
chosen to have charge of all the affairs of the college, 
not otherwise provided for. 

This committee in a report to the Legislature under 
date of Jan. 1895, stated that the funds offered them 
by the towns were all in the form of subscriptions, and 
that it was deemed proper by ihe trustees to require 
add'tional guarantees; and that at the date of the vote 
in favor of a location at Amherst, not an acre of the 
land scrip had been sold, and no reliable estimate of 
means could be formed. By the first week in Sep- 
tember, however, the trustees were able to make to 
the governor and council a report satisfactory to 
themselves, in which, and in accordance with His 
Excellency's request, they set forth at large the 
reasons for the location at Amherst. Briefly sum- 
marized the principal reasons were as follows : — The 



I 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



farm at Amherst, in general natural fertility, diversity 
of soil, and adaptation for the illustration of agricul- 
ture, was far superior to any other shown; it was 
situated in an agricultural region of native New Eng- 
land farmers ; it was near a thriving village sufficiently 
accessible ; it was so near to Amherst College that 
the college could to some extent avail itself of the 
liberal offers of the use of their valuable libraries and 
museums; and on account of the Bussey Institution it 
seemed just to locate the college in the western part 
of the State, rather than that both institutions should 
be located near Boston. 

The governor and council, with the executive com- 
mittee and other trustees, visited Amherst in June, 
1864, and carefully examined the lands offered for 
the location. A public notice for hearing all parties 
interested was given for Sept. 30th, and on that date 
the governor and council ordered that said location be 
approved, the vote standing 6 to 2. The reasons 
assigned by the minority for their action were recorded 
under date of Oct. 4. They were substantially as fol- 
lows : — That the farm did not embrace the requisite 
variety of soil ; that it lacked a sufficient supply of 
water for Irrigation, for mechanical purposes, for 
pisciculture, etc. ; that the subscription list was not 
satisfactory ; and that there was lack of clearness to 
the plans and purposes of the trustees in selecting 
that particular farm. 



shore and home and it never carried an Aggie crew 
again. 

The shell was stored in the boat-house at Hatfield 
until the collapse of that building, when it was trans- 
ferred to a dilapidated barn nearby, whence in the 
spring of 1878, Frederick Tuckerman and a class- 
mate, Edward C. Choate, removed it. They brought 
it on an express wagon by way of the Hatfield ferry 
to the college and placed it over the cases in the 
natural history rooms in South College. Here it 
remained until its removal at the time that the dor- 
mitory was destroyed by fire, Feb. 4, 1885. Long 
years it lay under the rafters of the Drill Hall, an 
object of wonderment to each freshman who had not 
heard of the greatest athletic victory Old Mass'chu 
setts has ever won. The story of its last short jour 
ney to the Trophy Room has been related already in 
these columns and now we have its life history com 
plete to date. 






ANOTHER BIT OF HISTORY. 

In the fall of 1 884, a little more than three years 
after the Ingleside Regatta held on the Connecticut 
river, the racing shell that, propelled by Herculean 
stroke, bore six brawny oarsmen to the finish in rec- 
ord time in that contest and thus won laurels for the 
maroon and white, was launched for the last time. 
It was on the occasion of the annual class races held 
at Hatfield by Amherst College. The crew consisted 
of Bane, Bunker, Clay, Winchester, Ladd— all '75 
men — and Foot, '78. They wore old drill shirts and 
overalls, and Winchester a light plug hat. The shell 
was minus seats and a rudder but with the same 
spirit as of yore the crew sent the boat humming 
through the water. Incidentally they once became 
stuck on a sandbar, much to the delight of the Am- 
herst students who lined the shores The frail craft 
began to fill with water even as they pulled for the 



EXTRACTS FROM A FRESHMAN'S NOTE- 
BOOK. 

COLLEGE SPIRIT. 

If a college man were asked with reference to the 
things of his college — its studies, its recreations, its 
athletics and all other elements which made up its 
organization— "what things are absolutely essential 
to it both as a whole and to the individual within its 
gates." he would be very likely to answer in some- 
what the following manner : a general high standard 
of proficiency in studies maintained by the students is 
one of the first requisites for the welfare of the col- 
lege and is only second in importance to College 
Spirit. This latter element is the most important 
single factor in the college. It is the heart and life of 
the organization. Without its influence the college 
man is a mere intellectual machine, narrow minded 
and self satisfied. In its environment, on the other 
hand, he stands on a common ground of interest and 
fellowship with students and faculty, not simply 
accumulating a store of knowledge but filling a place 
in the life of the organization and influencing for good 
or evil every man with whom he comes in contact. 
Before proceeding further it will be well to 
attempt to define the term College Spirit concretely 
and to consider what are the principle fields of activity 
which it embraces. College Spirit in its best and 



truest sense is the feeling which prompts a man to 
lay aside self interest and prejudice and to work for 
the benefit of his Alma Mater, seconding worthy ends 
only by worthy means. It appears to enter into four 
different phases of college interest. In the first place 
it knits the student body firmly together, overcomes 
antagonism, and creates fellowship. In the next 
place, it subserviates classes and fraternities to the 
college. In the third place, it maintains interest in 
all college activities, athletic, musical and literary. 
And lastly it preserves the loyalty of the graduates. 

We have said that College Spirit holds four offices, 
fulfills four distinct functions. But in so saying we 
have assumed an ideal spirit. We have assumed a 
college relation free from prejudice or enmity — a 
relation devoid of the influence of two faced slanderers 
who employ sharp tongues to destroy friendship and 
breed dissent. We have, in truth, assumed a 
relation, which exists in few colleges at the present 
time. 

What then shall we say the essence of College 
Spirit is as we observe it in our institutions ? Is it 
not a more or less morbid sentiment of Alma Mater, 
petty, lacking an ideal, tinged with many grains of 
individual selfishness, avoiding a moral issue and, In 
many instances, even pardoning deceit when that 
course of action proves a profitable policy. 

There is no single element ir. college life that can 
do. and in many instances does, more toward destroy- 
ing an ideal college spirit than the fraternity. A 
nation divided cannot stand and no more can a col- 
lege, hampered by the jealousies and hatred of rival 
fraternities, do the great good work for which it is 
intended. But, in spite of this fact, many colleges 
today are fairly echoing with the crash and din of 
fraternity strife. Self interest societies struggle to 
gain the mastery and to outline the policy of the 
institution. The noble conception of the college is 
lost and each movement made is a step backward. 

There are, furthermore, two evils which are the 
direct outcome of the college man's misguided spirit 
and which cannot be overlooked. The first may be 
termed in a general way the athletic evil and the 
second the class room evil. By the athletic evil is 
meant the practice of holding out to promising young 
athletes special inducements for coming to college 
and of heaping upon them, while in college, favors for 



their athletic services -even rewarding them with 
money. By the class evil is meant the practice of 
receiving and offering aid during ciassroom exercises. 
Many college men will claim that these practices are 
perfectly legitimate. They will argue that the ends 
to be gained entirely justify the means — that the 
honor brought to the college more than outbalances 
the petty deceit, that they are justified in wishing to 
gain athletic laurels for their college, that they are 
quite right in their desire to see all their fellow stu- 
dents successes in the class room. But this question 
will constantly arise. Are not the standards by which 
we judge cheats, deceivers and frauds the same inside 
college as outside it? Is the college man exempt 
from judgment by these standards ? Ought not his 
standards of honesty and integrity be higher ones for 
the very reason that he is a college man, — because 
of his intellectual superiority and better moral 
environment ? 



■Ethics" 



ETHICS Oh HAZING. 

has been defined by Daniel Webster as 
"the science of human duty." "Hazing" is a word 
of which the meaning is generally understood and 
therefore needs no explanation. Coupling the two 
definitions and drawing a little on our imaginations 
we arrive at the conclusion that the term "Ethics of 
Hazing" means the duty of the inhuman Sophomores 
to "paddle" all Freshmen in a "scientific manner." 
Since we presuppose that the Sophomores have a 
duty to perform it is to be assumed that they will 
undertake to carry it out. But we would fain 
remind them that many a duty has been left undone 
and that the world is no worse off for that reason. 



Dtpartm*rvt" flot?s. 



ENTOMOLOGY. 

A list of publications and articles of the Entomo- 
logical department has recently been compiled. A 
total of 162 articles have been published since 1887. 

Dr. Fernald recently lectured at Great Barrington 
on Massachusetts Fruit Trees and Their Insect Foes. 
HORTICULTURE. 

Plans for the projected greenhouses are being 
drawn by Professor White. 

Plans are also under way for a fruit -storage house. 



7 








10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



EXPERIMENT STATION. 
A bulletin on the Inspection of Commercial Food 
Stuffs by P. H. Smith and L. S. Walker has been 
recently issued. Two others will soon be published, 
one on Seed Separation by Dr. Stone, and one on a 
General Guide to Poultry Keeping for Egg Production 
by Professor Brooks. 

DIVISION OF PLANT AND ANIMAL 
CHEMISTRY. 
H. D. Haskins attended on March 5, the meeting 
of the representatives of the several experiment sta- 
tions at Boston, held for the purpose of determining 
the trade values of the different fertilizer ingredients 
for the present year. 

P. H. Smith recently made a thorough inspection 
of one of the large plants of the Corn Products Man- 
ufacturing Co. , located in New Jersey. This concern 
manufactures corn starch, glucose, corn oil and glu- 
ten feed from Indian corn. Mr. Smith made a spec- 
ial study of the process of manufacture of gluten feed 
in the interests of the experiment station. 

On Feb. 27 Mr. Smith lectured before the grange 
at Rome on the formation of cow-testing associations. 
C H. F|| er has resigned his position as dairy tester 
and the place has been filled by the appointment of 
John R. Bodurtha. There are at present some 
seventy-five Guernsey cows in yearly test over which 
Mr. Bodurtha has special supervision, In addition to 
this work from three to five men are constantly 
engaged in testing the butter fat capacity of Holstein- 
Freisian cows. 



Alumni. 



>71 # _E. B. Smead, Principal of the Watkinson 
Farm School of Hartford, Conn., is spending four 
months from Jan. 1st to May 1st in California, being 
granted a four months leave of absence. Address, 
The "Sunshine," Third and Cedar Sts., San Diego, 
Cal. 

'88 and '95.— F. S. Cooley and R. A. Cooley, 
both M. A. C. men , appear on the program of the 
joint meeting of the Montana Horticultural Society and 
the Montana State Dairyman's Association at Billings, 
Mont., Feb. 26-29. 



'95._Prof. C. B. Lane, Assistant Chief of the 
United States Dairy Division, who is in charge of 
market milk investigations, addressed the Ohio State 
Dairy Association at Columbus, Feb. 14th, and acted 
as judge in the milk and cream contest. Professor 
Lane has also addressed several other State Dairy 
Meetings during the winter and judged dairy products. 

EIGHTEEN NINETY-TWO. 

A. T. Beals, 138 W. 42nd St.. New York, 
Photographer. 

W. I. Boynton, D. D. S., 310 Main St., Whitney 
Building. Springfield, Dentist. A daughter was born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Boynton on Nov. 18, 1907. 

E. E. Clark, Hudson, Farmer. 

H. E. Crane, Quincy, Hay and Grain dealer. 

J. E. Deuel. Amherst. Druggist and Sporting 
Goods; residence, 30 Lincoln Ave. 

H. B. Emerson, Schenectady, N. Y. with General 
Electric Co., Power and Mining Engineering Dept., 
residence 216 Parkwood Boulevard. 

J. L. Field, Chicago, 111., Salesman for Jenkins, 
Kreer & Co.. Dry Goods Commission Merchants; 
residence, Oak Park, 111. 

William Fletcher. Chelmsford, Drummer. 

C. S. Graham. Holden, Dairy and Fruit Farmer. 

E. B. Holland, M. S., Amherst, Associate Chem- 
ist, Mass. Agricultural Experiment Station. Depart- 
ment Plant and Animal Chemisiry ; residence 28 
North Prospect Street. 

C. M. Hubbard. Sunderiand, Onion and Tobacco 
Farmer. 

J. B. Knight, M. S., Poona, India, Professor of 
Agriculture and Director of Experiment Station ; res- 
idence Kirkel. India. 



P. P. Lyman, M. D. V., 1260 Main St., Hartford. 
Conn., Cotton & Lyman, Veterinary surgeons; resi- 
dence 82 Oakland Terrace. Secretary of American 
Veterinary Medical Association. At present deliver- 
ing a course of lectures at the Kansas City Veterinary 
College . 

F. H. Plumb, Stafford Springs. Conn., R. F. D., 
Ellithorp Farm. 

E. Rogers. Kennebunk, Me., Vice-President and 
General Manager National Fiber Board* Co. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



it 



F. G. Stockbridge, Narcissa. Pa., Supt. of Triple 
Springs Farm. 

G. E. Taylor, Shelburne. Shinglebrook Stock 
Farm. Pure- Bred Shorthorn Cattle and Shropshire 
Sheep. 

H. M. Thomson. Thompson, Conn. 

H. C. West, address unknown. 

G. B. Willard. Waltham, City Treasurer and Col- 
lector of Taxes, residence 14 Lafayette St. 

M. H. Williams, M. D. V., Sunderland, Veteri- 
nary Surgeon. 

Ex- '92.— F. G. Baidus, 179 Lincoln St., Boston, 
Traveling Salesman. 

Ex-'92.— C. D. H. Condit, Troy Hills. N. J. 

Ex- '92. — F. A. Farrar, South Manchester, Conn., 
President F. F. Blish Hardware Co. 

Ex- '92. —A. R. Wood. Central Village, Grocer and 
Provision Dealer. 

'95. — George A. Billings has resigned his position 
of Dairy Husbandman of the New Jersey State 
Experiment Station to accept a position in the Office 
of Farm Management, Bureau of Plant Industry, 



Washinton, D. C. Mr. Billings will have charge of 
dairy farm management investigation and his field of 
work will extend to all dairy districts of the United 
States. 

'03. — The Horticultural Club of Michigan Agricul- 
tural College, now in charge of C. P. Halligan, was 
favored with an address on March 4 from M. H. 
West, now of Lincoln Park, Chicago. 

'05. — A. N. Swain. Forester and Entomologist, 
15 Merlin St.. Dorchester. Mr. Swain has recently 
been awarded the contract of removing the moth nests 
from the trees in the yards of thirty-five schools in 
Boston. 

'07. — W. E. Dickinson, Central Hormiguero, Hor- 
miguero, Cuba. 

'07.— F. A. Watkins, Rio Piedras, P. R., Univer- 
sity of Puerto Rico. 

'07. — F. C. Peters has been taken into the firm 
of H. L. Frost and Co., Foresters. 

Ex-'09.— C. H. Maps will, after March I, be 
engaged in truck farming at Santa Maria. Cameron 
County, Tex. 



TALK 



won't impress you much. 
Even the poorest hats are spoken of well in their own advertisments. 
But if you come in and try on one of OUR HATS— that's different- 
We have them all : in brown, pearl, gazelle, coco, acme, white or black, 
soft and stiff. 

Every hat we sell is guaranteed to do its duty. 
Spring line ready for inspection. 

totoc & Ttfe? SUSP 

"■AUkfs Welcome -Wy or not 
Amherst House Block. 



1 



I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



| 



THE 

DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSING, MICHIGAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT COURSE MEN 
I place buttermakers, cheesemakers. managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



Spring and Summer Woolen* Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 



ii 



AMHERST 



TAILOK 
AMITY STREET, 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, tit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephonic 54-4. 



It's Your Next at the 



Must House Baibei Slop 



Four First Class Barbers 



GOODS FOR MEN 





Open Mondays from 


J A. M. to 


8 t. M. 


Tuesdays ; 


. 11 


6 « 


Wednesdays, ; 


_ 1 1 


8 " 


Thursdays, 3 


•• 


6 " 


Fridays, 


T " 


8 " 


Saturdays, ; 


. li 


11 " 



C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets. Comfortables and Towels. 



CAMPION, 

AIL.OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's Jim, 



Olil South Street, off Main, 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, a Confectionery and Fruit, 



Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 FES DAT. 

When in " Hsmp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO~DINBTN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

(iron* Strong, Vigorous. Healthy l'lants That Resist Disease 
DR. UKORUK K. 8TONK, 1'rofenwor of Hotuny at tin- Mmt 
Agricultural College, ami I'rofettaor <»f Plant DiMtMt at the 
Hatch Experiment Mat ion, Amlin»i, Mass., writes to our 
Agricultural Expert aa follow-. 

"I will aav that 1 consider the formula which you 

Erepared for Mr. Hrescott bikI applied by him OB In- 
cus was very effectual in controlling the asparagus 
ruat. The application of yonr formula ami othei fi-a 
turea which were carrleil out in the management of 
these beds convince me that it constituted the beat 
■ lemon .t ration of the control of aaparagu* nipt which 
baa ever been made In thl» country." 
GENUINE PERUVIAN GUAyO formed the basin -of the 
above mentioned formula. It waa used on the aaparagu* i>«<l* 
of C, W. l'KMCOTT., Concord, Mass.. the largest Individual 
grower of Aaparagu* In New England. We also offer 

WK ALSO OKKKK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizing materials from New York, Hoaton, 

Haas., and Charleston, S. C. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant rood 

Problems," la sent free of charge. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Sole Importers for C 8. of Gen ill ue Peruvian Guano, and 
Manufacturers of High Grade Fertilisers. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City. 



44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 




4% In order to obtain 

t9_ the best resultsin ath- 

y^JJy letic contests, it is 

/4f. Tfi».\ important that you 

fT~ //VlA/\J should have the best 

V^Akkk^^ lYAw implements. They 

may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not nave 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes.Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
_ goods have character 

—our trademark means something. 

--end for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

WRIOH'r <& OITSOIV 




344 WASHINGTON 

iS WEST 30TH ST 

CNICAOO Provides* l . K. 



ST.. BOSTON 
NEW YORK 
1. Cambridge, Mass. 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



HOCKEY TIME 

SKATES STICKS 

SKATING SHOES PUCKS 

Sporting Goods 
Repair Shop :: 

Sharpening Skates or Anything Klsc. 



K. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Hank, AMHERST 




Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06. 07, 08 Classes. 












Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and /foods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth Ave , New York. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH 



i 



•11 Maln8t., Northampton. 

Masonic Mock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars. Noted for it» excellent 

oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAHOFACTUKEK OF 

SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple. Lemon and German Tonic, Btrch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 



Riteb Stbebt, 



NOETHAMFTON, Hill. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUG STOVE. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladles' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 



jep-Mllitary Work a Specialty., 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhbrst, Mass. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



TRY OUR 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

M.A.C.Aift, H.M.jENNI«10X,'Oi» 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Out Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
«. " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

^rSATISFAOTION OUABANTBBD. I© 8 

if. A. UTLEY, Jfanoyrr. 

OFFICE : 

East Fleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT the 



COIvLBOE STORE. 

The Children are Happy. 
Because their clothe* are made on the New Home Sewin<; 
Maoiike, which fact, aisuren them of no "rips. Mothers 
should yet one at once as It will do for their children in year* 
to come. Dealer* Everywhere. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway Co. 

AMHKRBT DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Amherst ami Northampton on the hour anil 
half hour from 6.30*. M. till 10.30 F. u. Sundays the first ear 
will leave at 8.30 a.m. 

Maim office, Uheenkielu, Mass. 

John A.Tagg-art, Supt. 

Southampton Office, n« Main St. 

C. W.Clapp, Asst Supt. Telephone, Northampton, lift 12. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Offosite Town Hai.i.. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Am Iter <. 

Central Vermont Railway Co. - 

Southern Division. 

(OKKKCTED TO JAN. 1, I WW 



Kllsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

(M'TI.KK'K BUM K. AMIIKKST, MASS 



O. «. GATES, !>.!>.». 

DENTAL ROOMS, 



CUTLBBt Hi. <m h, 



AMIIKKST, MASS 



SOUTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.21 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

MII.IMMV lil.nik. ... AMIIKKST, MASH. 

Office Hours 
TO 13 Ak.. xa... l-ao to a i». M. 

Ether and Nltroua Oxide Oas administered when desired. 

THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Fsot Office, 



AMHKKST. MASS. 



Are you in need of a 

Dresses Shirt? 

We have a few that we are closing out at 

75c. and 85c. each. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



! 



I 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




GOING OUT OF BU8INBS8. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of If. A. C. PHOTOGKAPHEK, 

f* a . £ lL!- - -- --. , amma a»*.*4a«*0 thtL' 

Hiffh Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 
spring. 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE, HI. A. C. 

Telephone. 



Arthur K. Dorr. 



L. H. TOURTKLOTTK. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AND .lollltKRS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON. LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 

Corner North and Union SU., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mas*. 

Tel. 332-2. 



J. L. DANA, 

THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., N0RTH pleasant st. stables 




in l.AKOWST coi.lkgk knorav- 

ING UOU8K IN TIIK WORLD. 

Works: 17th Street&LehighAve. 

O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



CHASES. BARN. NEAK EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS 



J. H.TROTT 



PUPER, STEflHi & BBS FITTER, 

PUB DEALER III STOVES HMD RRHGES. 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals 
Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 
Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers hy merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36- r 2. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders I-eft at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE JIND CARPET STORE. 



A COMI'LF.TE LINK OF GOODS 
M.TTED TO THK 8Tl'I>KNTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest /'rices. 



KHTAUI.ISHKD IHM. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix How, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET . 



BILL 



J I 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO All. 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for fi.50. 



J. A. TURNER. 



PI.F.ASANT ST., 



OVER \MHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINK OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. 1 >aily and Sunday Papers. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

$06-111 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMI'OKI'KKH ANIt MANI'HAl TI'KKHH M 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 

We handle tlM nest ol 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYoKB. MASS. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 
and Class Dinners. 

OKO. H. BOWKER & CO. 






AttHast , Mass, 
















> |^u— ^ H El •«= 



> 



flfoaesacbueetts 
Bgricultural 

Golleae 



ANI> 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 

OFFERS 



SHORT COURSES M follows: 

(a) A Short Wintkr Colrsk in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Coiksk in Bbe Cii.turk. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Requlked 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year: Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to sesidents in the United States. 

Neoessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. BrrrRRriitLD, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 12 






MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHEKST. MASS.. MARCH 25. 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specially. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, IflAMDOblN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



FINISH 





Deuef s Drug Store. 



OCCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 
GO TO .... 

Page's Sftoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



With a life insurance policy in a good company, 
most 

STUDENTS CAN BORROW MONEY 

to pay college expenses. 



W. R. BROWN 
Savings Bank Block, - . AMHERST. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MARCH 25. 1908 



NO. 12 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collegi Signal, Amherst. Mass. Ths Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested te 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRICCS. 1909, Business Manager. 
E. F. DAMON. 1 9 10. Assistant Business Manager. 
R. C POTTER, 1909, College Notes. W. R. CLARKE. 1910, Department Notes. 

W. E. ADAMS. 1909, Alumni Notes. L. C BROWN. 1910, Athletic Notes. 

C H. WHITE, 1909, Y. M. C A. Notes. H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Special. 

R. N. HALLOWELL. 1911. 
S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 



Terms i fl.OO per year in adcance. Single Copies, IOc. Postage outside al United States end Canada, tftc. extra. 



Athletic Board, 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-ball Association, 
base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jenntson. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager- 
College Senate. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C- A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Cillett. President 



J. R. Parker, Pres. 
R. D. Lul<. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Past Office st Amherst, 
umnu v »»w.».»\, Mamas, 



Edi-tbr.&ls. 



The Sicnal Board of 1907 -'08 has completed its 
year's task and the new board assumes the duties and 
responsibilities of issuing the College newspaper. 
The Signal Board of 1908- '09 herewith extends to 
the retired seniors its appreciation of their efficient 
work in that they have left the paper in such a condi- 
tion that the present editors may take up the work and 
carry it on with the least possible delay and loss of 
energy. The experience of editorial boards is cumu- 
lative and should be the more so as we learn to profit 
by the experience of others. 

The Board does not contemplate any startling 
changes in the manner of conducting the paper. That 
it should be the College Signal of the College and for 
the College, in the broadest sense, every M. A. C. 
man, undergraduate or alumnus, must admit. That 
it must be maintained as a newspaper in the strict 
definition of that term and in contradistinction to a 
literary publication, the experience of the last few 
years has proved beyond a doubt. 



The Board has three distinct purposes in mind this 
year : — First, to publish facts concerning the life and 
work of the Massachusetts Agricultural College ; 
Second, to reflect the best college sentiment; Third, 
to make the best college sentiment the common 
property of more of the undergraduates. If the 
Board fails to accomplish the first and second aims 
and to make one step forward toward the accomplish- 
ment of the third it will not have done its duty. 

Facts must come from those who are active In 
making history. The baseball season will now engage 
the attention of the athletics editor. College 
notes are at best pickings but we hope to make them 
attractive as we gain experience. The heads of 
every department will be interviewed each fortnight. 
If they will be ready with copious notes this part of 
the paper may be made interesting reading. The 
alumni, by far the largest group in point of numbers 
among the subscribers to the Sicnal, are earnestly 
urged to send in notes of interest concerning them- 
selves, their work and any article relating to the Col- 
lege If alumni will not be heard from how do they 




I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




expect to hear from alumni through the columns of 
the Signal ? In justice to those who have main- 
tained communication with the Signal for years, let 
it be said that the Board feels that in them it has a 
nucleus around which to build up a record alumni list 
of subscribers. 

In order that the Board may do its duty by every 
student and graduate it must have their co-operation 
and sympathy. Any organization, no matter what its 
origin, composition or construction must stand for 
something. And it is not enough that this something 
be principle or creed or sentiment. There must be 
the support of live individuals and thinking men in 
whose ceaseless interchange of opinions and actions 
the organization finds its cause for being, and to the 
solving of whose problems it is pledged. It is not 
enough to discuss and criticise in the private places. 
If you have anything worth saying come out with it. 
No editor ever expects to say anything worth while 
without criticism and if the editor of this paper does 
not receive criticism he will feel that he is not saying 
anything worth while. But remember there are two 
kinds of criticism, one constructive, the other, 
destructive. Constructive criticism Is that which 
endeavors to build up, destructive criticism to tear 
down. The former seeks to correct error, allay 
prejudice, untangle misunderstandings and substitute 
right, impartiality and truth. The latter lurks in the 
shadows, attacks from behind and carries with it sar- 
casm, envy, hatred. The best college spirit is shown 
by him who with a loyal heart and friendly purpose 
tries to correct faults among his fellows. He that 
uses denunciation and violence undoes in a day more 
than the other can realize in a week. Just this, — if 
the editor or any of his staff publish any article which 
seems to detract from the best democratic spirit 
existent in these college walls, they are liable and 
ready to meet squarely and on a level any construc- 
tive criticism that will not only make them see clearly 
their misinterpretations but help the College Signal 
to serve a bigger purpose than it ever has before. 

We have in a flourishing condition in our midst a 
Y. M. C. A. What the association is here, today, 
is due to the earnest, untiring efforts of a few leaders 
of men. What good it has accomplished or what 
good it will accomplish is not to be discussed now. 
Be it said that the editor recognizes the Y. M. C. A. 



as a vital part of college life and believes the doings 
of the Y. M. C. A. should have just as prominent a 
position in the College newspaper as any of the other 
activities of M. A. C. Therefore, a Y. M. C. A. 
editorship has been created and so far as in us is pos- 
sible, the association shall have space. 

On the other hand, accounts of petty fusses and 
individual grievances will find no space In the columns 
of the Signal. There are those who have a hanker- 
ing after sensation and enjoy a squabble to see the 
fun go on, but the editor has no sympathy for such. 
For faculty jars and student disruptions there are the 
proper channels of settlement inside the gates of the 
College. With this statement of purpose the Signal 
Board places its first organized attempt at journalism 
in your hands. 



Another Bit of History" pub- 
of March 1 1 , substitute North 
One of the older alumni who 
has two picture-frames made from parts of the 
Amherst shell that was crushed when the boat-house 
collapsed is authority for the correction. 



Erratum. For 
lished in the issut 
Hadley for Hatfield 



The College Signal subscribes to the daily edi- 
tion of the Springfield Republican. This will be 
drawn upon, as well as other sources of like nature, 
for articles from time to time, due credit being 
given in each instance. With the limited time at 
the disposal of the members of the Board under the 
present system of all work and no credit, the subscrib- 
ers are asked to bear patiently with occasional excerpts 
from current periodicals. 



As we go to our homes to spend the vacation let us 
take with us some of the college spirit, "Mass'chu- 
setts" spirit; the spirit of the soil and the crops to 
be, the spirit of the hills, the mountains and the trees. 
Let us be filled with these things and be proud, when 
questioned, to reply that we are students at the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College. At every opportunity 
and in every way put in a good word for M. A. C. 
It is the kind of loyalty that counts. And when we 
return to our Alma Mater let us bring back a meas- 
ure of the practicalities of the world. We are in 
danger of becoming visionary unless we get some 
worldly knocks to set us thinking. All now, back from 
our homes with nobler zeal and a determination to 
work I 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Immediately after the close of the basketball sea- 
son two weeks ago, the baseball candidates were 
called out by Captain Cobb for indoor practice in th e 
Drill hall. About thirty men responded, of whom the 
following have survived the first cut: Cobb, Shattuck. 
Warner '08; O 'Grady, O'Donnell. Hubbard, Webb. 
Noyes, Warner '09 ; Hayward, French, Schermer- 
horn, Blaney, Brown, Tilton, Hill, Wheeler, Morse, 
Piper, Coash and Daniels. 

During the temporary absence of Cobb, Shattuck 
is acting-captain, under the direction of Coach Breck- 
enridge of Amherst, who has been secured by Mana- 
ger Crossman to spend a few hours weekly in show- 
ing the squad how to bat and field. He is layii.g 
much emphasis on correct form in batting, especially 
in bunting. All the work so far has been inside, so it is 
difficult to tell what the new men can do. It was 
expected that the team would begin outdoor work by 
the middle of last week, but the light snow which 
fell during the seventeenth and eighteenth has delayed 
it. 



INDOOR TRACK MEET. 

The great success of the indoor track meet of last 
Friday evening augurs well for the future of track 
athletics of all kinds at M. A. C. Some months 
ago an effort was made to arouse interest in an ath- 
letic field and track. Some doubt was expressed at 
the time as to whether the students would take hold 
of the athletic part of it, if the track was provided. 
It was decided to hold an indoor meet some time 
during the spring as a test of the feeling of the student 
body toward track athletics. Committees were ap- 
pointed from each class to confer on the details, and 
money was raised by subscription among the various 
classes. The meet was so successful in every way, 
due to the energy and ability of the class track cap- 
tains and others, that it will no doubt become a regu- 
lar feature of the athletics here. It has been proved 
that we have the men and what is just as essential, the 
interest in such things, to make the establishment of 
outdoor track events a success. After these class 
contests become well established, it would be relatively 
easy to enlarge the sphere of our activity and enter 
intercollegiate contests. This was the ultimate object 



of the promoters of last Friday's meet, and the 
realization of that object is much nearer now than 
ever before. 

The meet itself, as will be seen on the lists be- 
low, consists of nine events. In all but the relay 
race, the scale of points was 5-3-1. In the relay, 
however, it was 10-5-2. As was to be expected, the 
upper classes won a large majority of the points, with 
the Juniors leading with 37, Seniors 27, Freshmen 
17, Sophomores 8. 

The 25 yard dash was run in four heats, which 
Alger, Lew, Hathaway and Tilton won in time vary- 
ing from 3 4-5 to 3 2-5 seconds. Barry, Damon, 
Hammond, and Crossman were close seconds. In 
the first heat of the semi-finals, Lew led Crossman 
at 3 2-5 seconds. Hathaway led Damon in the 
second heat in the same time. Tilton was a great 
disappointment to the Freshmen in this event, for he 
had done very good work in his preliminary heat. 
Lew won the final in 3 2-5 seconds, with Hathaway 
second and Damon third. The potato races were 
very close, in both trial heats and final. Hayward 
won in 41 4-5 seconds, beating Daniels by a narrow 
margin. Prouty was No. 3 man. 

Hathaway led the bunch in the sack race at a 6 
1-5 second clip. Larsen and Hammond followed 
him in the order named. Larsen won the first heat 
of the obstacle race in 22 2-5 seconds, with Hatha- 
way next. Barry won his heat in 21 flat, with 
Cloues trailing. In the final, Barry came home in 
20 4-5 seconds, Larsen and Cloues following. 

Each contestant (or the honors in shot putting was 
allowed three preliminary puts, the four men making 
the best distance in one of these puts to enter the 
final. Turner, Crosby, Johnson, and Philbrick were 
the men who qualified. Of these Turner easily made 
the best distance, 43 feet, 1 inch, Crosby followed 
with 41" 8', Philbrick with 39' 4". 

The high jump was close ail the way. Turner, 
Daniels and Young were the last to fail to make the 
height. Turner went 5 feet 3 inches and led Daniels 
by one inch. 

The three broad jumps were interesting. C. S. 
Gillett did excellent work in defeating such a fast man 
as Lew. He did 28 feet, 6 inches, Lew 28' 3", 
Noble 27' 6". 

Nickless had it on the rest of the climbers in the 



\ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Barry passed his 6 second 
Young was not far behind 



prelims, but in the final 
mark In 5 4-5 seconds, 
with 6 3-5. 

The relay race was the event of the evening, for 
the greater number of points it counted made it an 
object of special effort. O'Grady led his three rivals 
on the homestretch, and '09 had clinched her victory. 
The time of tne relay was 34 seconds. 
Starter — McClure of Amherst. 
Timekeepers — Nelligan of Amherst, 

Fisher of Amherst, 

Franklin of M. A. C. 
Measurers — Franklin, Gribben. Armstrong. 
Attendance — 300. 

Summary of Events. 



EVENTS. 


'08 


'09 


'10 


'11 


25-yard Dash. 




3 


1 


5 


Potato Race, 




5 


1 


3 


Sack Race, 


3 


5 




1 


Obstacle Race, 


8 




1 




Shot Put, 


1 


8 






High Jump, 




5 




4 


3 Broad Jumps, 


5 


1 




3 


Rope Climb, 


5 




3 


1 


Relay Race, 


5 


10 


2 




Total Points, 


27 


37 


8 


17 





$10 to James W. Noonan with a score of 92 1-2. 
For excellent stock judging, the first prize of $10 
went to Walter D. Sawer; second of $7.50 to George 
A. Sill ; third of $5 to Rodney E.Monk; fourth prize 
of $2.50 to Edward H. Barrows. The prize offered 
by Bowker Fertilizer Company of Boston for the best 
essay on the subject, "Use of fertilizer on a dairy 
farm," one-half ton of high-grade Stockbridge fertil- 
izer, awarded to Alton T. Woods ; honorable mention 
to Fred B. Johnson and Galen A. Proctor. The 
prize offered by the German kali works for the best 
essay on the subject, "Use of fertilizer on the farm,' ' 
one ton of kainit, or money value, awarded to Alton 
T. Woods; honorable mention to Galen A. Proctor 
and Rodney E. Monk. 

Toasts were responded to by President Butterfield. 
Secretary Ellsworth of the State Board of Agriculture, 
Professor Brooks, Mr. Johnson for the class, Dr. 
Lindsey, Mr. Ellis and Mr. Howe. Certificates were 
awarded by President Butterfield. 



Collegt flotts- 



BANQUET OF SHORT COURSE MEN. 

The annual farewell banquet and closing exercise 
of the Short Winter Course men was held in Draper 
Hall on the evening of March 12. The hall was 
prettily decorated for the occasion with flags and 
potted plants. After those present had done full 
justice to the sumptuous banquet, Mr. Bowditch, 
toastmaster of the occasion made known the awards 
of prizes. With the exception of the fertilizer prizes, 
these are given by the Massachusetts Society for the 
Promotion of Agriculture. 

The awards are as follows : For best work during 
entire course, first prize of $50 to Alton Palmer 
Woods ; second prize of $30 to Dana A. Ralph ; 
third prize of $20 to Rodney E. Monk. For the best 
butter made by students, the first prize of $25 went to 
Charles E. Flagen with a score of 94 ; second of $15 
to Dana A. Ralph with a score of 93, and third of 



Davy, 1911, has left college. 

A son was born to Professor and Mrs. Howard last 
week. 

A, N. Swain '05, was about college for a few days 
last week. 

W. E. Leonard * 10, is confined to his room on 
account of illness. 

" Chapters in Rural Progress" has been added to 
the college library. 

Dr. Fernald addressed the Fruit-growers Union in 
Worcester, last week. 

Rev. F. L. Goodspeed addressed the Sunday Ves- 
pers on March 15, 1908. 

Mumps are quite prevalent about college. Several 
students have gone home because of them. 

G. R. Cobb '08, is working for a month with a land- 
scape gardening firm in Rochester, New York. 

The battalion was out for a drill on the sidewalks 
Monday, March 16. Sure sign of spring's advent ! 

Mr. E. C. Mercer addressed the Assembly on 
March 1 1 , giving an interesting talk on the " College 
Man Down and Out." 



At the Signal Board meeting, March 12, E. F. 
Damon '10, was elected assistant business manager. 

Dr. Gordon gave an interesting lecture before the 
Natural History Club on March 4th. His subject 
was, " Evolution of the Fishes." 

Dr. H. T. Fernald gave an interesting lecture be- 
fore the Natural History Club on March 10. His 
subject was "The Biological Laboratory at Mawssau." 

President Butterfield gave an impressive address on 
•A Campaign for Rural Progress," in the Edwards 
Church chapel at Northampton on the evening of 
March II. 

On last Monday L. C. Willis '09, met with a pain- 
ful accident. While walking down stairs he slipped 
and fell on some broken glass the cuts resulting in the 
loss of his thumb. 

Mr. Frank M. Gracey has been appointed local 
preacher by Presiding Elder Richardson at the quar- 
terly conference held Monday evening, March 16, in 
Wesley Methodist church. 

Hon. E. H. Mead of Boston, a member of the 
World's peace conference at the Hague, addressed 
Assembly on March 18. His subject was the "Work 
of the Hague Parliament." 

Dr. R. S. Lull lectured before the Natural History 
club on March the 17th his subject being " The Call 
ot the Sea." The students showed fine spirit in 
coming en masse to hear him. He was greeted with 
the long yell and hearty applause. Dr. Lull holds a 
unique place in the hearts of the two upper classes. 

As students we all must realize at times during our 
college course the real value derived from strong 
friendships formed at college. Any features in col- 
lege life, that will tend to encourage this friendship is 
greatly to be desired. All those who attended the sup- 
per and accompanying entertainment at the Dining 
Hall, Saturday, March 14th, could not but feel that 
such a social event is producing worthy results and will 
if continued form a closer bond of friendship among 
ourselves and with the faculty. Saturday evening's 
program was one of exceptional interest. During the 
supper the college orchestra rendered several pleasing 
selections after which all united their voices in singing 
college songs. Dean Mills then made some fitting 
remarks by way of introducing Dr. Charles A. East- 



man, the speaker of the evening. Dr. Eastman Is 
a Dartmouth graduate and now holds a responsible 
government position. He based his remarks for the 
most part upon the old type Indian, his psychology and 
various characteristics, laying special emphasis upon 
the artificial life of the Amercan as compared with the 
free, natural life of the Indian, giving one an entirely 
different impression of the Indian than would be possi- 
ble through the reading of history. Dr. Eastman 
enlivened his address by many witty sayings and 
clever " hits " at the white man. 

The evening's entertainment ended with a long 
cheer for Dr. Eastman. 



CLOSING PROGRAM. 

The closing exercises of the dairy school were 
held Thursday, March 12, in the chapel. The Hamp- 
shire Agricultural Society held an institute at the col- 
lege during the day. Mild weather, good speakers 
and a large attendance combined to make the institute 
one of the most successful ever held in the state. 

At 9.30 a. m., the members of the school gave 
a demonstration of the operations of dairy machin- 
ery in the dairy room. At 1 1 o'clock the chapel was 
well filled. Dr. Ivan C. Weld of the dairy bureau, 
United States Department of Agriculture, Washing- 
ton, D. C, spoke on "The production of pure milk 
for market." Dinner was served at Draper Hall at 
I o'clock, after which the meeting was again called 
to order. The speaker of the morning finished his 
address by presenting a number of charts. The 
regular afternoon session was given over to Warren 
Jewett of Worcester, who gave a talk on " Eighteen 
month's experience milking cows by steam." The 
banquet and announcement of the awards of prizes 
in the evening completed the dairy school program 
for the year. 

INFORMAL DANCE. 

A very successful Informal Dance was held in the 
Drill-hall March 7, over 60 couples attending. The 
Drill-hall was decorated in the usual tasty fashion 
with evergreens and potted plants from the Plant- 
houses, with a generous display of banners and pen- 
nants. The north end of the hall was curtained off by 
a huge American flag as a promenade, the rest of the 
floor being reserved for dancing. Derrick's Westfield 



I 



f 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Orchestra furnished the music. Lunch at intermis- 
sion was served at Draper Hall. The patronesses of 
the evening were Mrs Smith, Mrs. Hasbrouck and 
Mrs. Foord of Amherst, Mrs. Orcutt of Smith and 
Miss Reeves of Mount Holyoke. 

Those who attended : 

Prof. J. A. Foord, P. H. Smith, G. H. Chapman, 
G. N. Willis, L. S. Walker, E. F. Gaskill, A. J. 
Anderson, L. W. Chapman. H. C. Chase, 0. R. 
Clark, G. R. Cobb, R. E. Cutting, S. L. Davenport, 
P. M. Eastman, C. L. Flint, C. S. Gillett, K. E. 
Gillett, R. H. Jackson, L. D. Larsen, J. R. Parker, 
R. H. Verbeck, A. L. Whiting, W. F. Turner, W. 

F. Sawyer, W. L. Ide, R. D. Lull, W. D. Barlow, 

G. M. Codding. E. F. Hathaway, M. W. Thompson, 
C. R. Webb, R. H. Allen, L. C. Brown, R. E. 
Annis, R. P. Armstrong, S. C. Blaney, H. C. 
Brooks, |. P. Brooks, L. Brandt, W. R. Clarke, W. 
C. Johnson, W. E. Leonard, F. P. Nickless, E. F. 
Damon, F. A. Prouty, F. H. Partridge, F. L. 
Thomas. R. S. Eddy. P. W. Allen. H. W. Blaney, 
C. P. Hammond, C. A. Lodge, A. H. Sharpe, G. 
A. Tilton, R. S. Whitney, R. S. McNayr, J. A. 
Davey ; A. M. Batchelder, New Hampshire State 
College, W. B. Parker, M. I. T., E. A. Smallman 
and Ned Griffin, Dartmouth. 



Those who attended the Y. M. C. A. meeting on 
Thursday. March 5th, and heard the address of Mr. 
McMillan were amply repaid for going. Beginning 
with an illustration of the college student who showed 
his limited knowledge of the Bible by admitting that 
he had always supposed Gomorrah to be the daughter 
of Sodom. Mr. McMillan led off into a most interest- 
ing talk on "The College Man in the Coming Social 
Crisis." 

The coming social crisis is a subject of great inter- 
est and moment today. Many books and magazine 
articles are written upon it. and the problem which it 
offers is engaging the serious thought of a growing 
number of people. "What do you think about it ?" 
"What are your views on the matter >" are questions 
at present demanded by one man of another. It is of 
great importance that we study to answer these ques- 
tions for ourselves, for the actual solving of the 
problem may lie mostly in the hands of college gradu- 



ates, those who are naturally expected to become 
leaders. 

A social crisis is growing out of the closer relations 
arising between men. The world is growing smaller 
geographically. Increasing speed in transportation, 
in telegraphic communication, etc., are bringing 
nations elbow to elbow and intermingling their peoples 
in a manner not existing heretofore. Caste lines, 
within nations, are fast breaking down and the inter 
mingling of classes is more common than formerly. 
In the industrial field labor and capital are being 
forced to live on terms of closer and more mutual 
relationship. And so, especially in our own country, 
men's contact with each other and dependence upon 
each other are constantly growing more marked. 
What does this mean ? That unless a majority of 
the people and an adequate number of leaders, thus 
so closely associated, are controlled by the best spirit 
of good-will trouble is bound to ensue. When two 
men come into close companionship they will do one 
of two things; either get along peaceably or not get 
along peaceably. In a dense crowd of shoppers, for 
instance, calmness and consideration are essential to 
a general forward movement. The moment that 
some grow thoughtless, selfish and evil minded, and 
jostle, harm or take unfair advantages, that moment 
trouble and melees are bound to arise. The thicker 
the crowd, the more essential is the maintenance of a 
sane and considerate bearing. 

So in the coming social crisis, the closer the 
relations of men become, the greater the necessity 
that a majority of them be of generous, unselfish 
character. When we leave college, we are to be 
thrown into the midst of the conflict. We must 
either move firmly toward the right, or be swayed 
toward the wrong. For the best good of all we must 
enter the struggle standing upon a firm and solid 
moral foundation, a foundation of integrity, unselfish 
ness and purity, and college Is where this foundation 
must be built. The temptations of real life are far 
more severe than those of college life. In the battle 
of life a mere intellectual code of ethics is soon tum- 
bled down and the student who goes forth depending 
only on such soon descends to the lower plane of liv- 
ing. Something deeper is needed : convictions, 
hatred of sin, the power to conquer besetting evils 
from within and without. We must be filled with 



earnest thoughts of good ; such thoughts as must find 
expression in acts of good influence ; such thoughts as 
we may live to see worked out in the lives of those 
whom we touch daily. The way to be filled with 
such thoughts of power is to keep in touch with God 
and Jesus Christ through a conscientious study of the 
Bible. The great Bible study movement now fasten- 
ing with such a grip upon college men throughout the 
country might seem to be Inspired by God in prepara- 
tion for the social crisis, and to furnish strong leaders 
for the future from the present ranks of college men. 
What do you think about it? What are your views 
on the matter ? What stand are you going to take ? 



CONNECTICUT VALLEY ASSOCIATION. 

At the annual meeting of the Connecticut Valley 
Association of Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Alumni the following officers were elected: President. 
Charles A. Goodrich, '93, Hartford, Conn.; vice- 
presidents, 1st vice-president. Charles E. Beach, '82, 
West Hartford, Conn.; 2nd vice-president, James H. 
Webb, '83. New Haven. Conn. ; secretary, Walter 
B. Hatch, '05, Hartford, Conn.; treasurer, A. S. 
Kinney. '96, South Hadley; executive committee, 
Charles A. Goodrich, '93, Charles E. Beach, '82, 
James H. Webb. 73, Walter B. Hatch. '05, A. S. 
Kinney, '96. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

HISTORICAL SKETCHES, BY F. H. FOWLER, '87. 

6. Organization. 

The inaugural address of His Excellency Governor 
Andrew, in January, 1863, is of interest because in it 
he devoted several pages to the consideration of 
"Farming," the "Public Schools," and the "School 
of Agriculture and the Arts." He evidently took 
great interest in these matters and his conception of 
what the institution established under the Congres- 
sional grant should be is worthy of being recorded. 
He said that such an institution should have ample 
lands for experimental purposes, and even on a mod- 
erate scale of completeness should embrace the fol- 
lowing distinct professorships : 

I. Mathematics pure, and applied to Surveying, 
Levelling, etc. 



2. Drawing and Design. 

3. General Physics and Meteorology. 

4. Mechanics and Engineering, especially as 

applied to agricultural machinery and pro- 
cesses, to rural architecture, road-making, etc. 

5. General and Agricultural Chemistry. 

6. Chemical Analysis, especially as applied to soils, 

manures and products. 

7. Botany and Vegetable Physiology. 

8. Zoology and Animal Physiology, including 

breeding of animals, their diseases and 
treatment. 

9. Geology and Mineralogy. 

10. Practical Husbandry, with superintendence of 
model farms. 

That in many of these departments one or more 
assistants, or sub-professors, would be necessary, and 
that the whole corps of instructors could hardly fall 
short of twenty. 

At a meeting of the trustees of the college on Nov. 
29, 1864, President French and Secretary Flint 
were made a committee to consider and report a plan 
of organization of the college, required by the act of 
Incorporation. The following plan was submitted to 
the Governor and Council on Feb. 7, 1867, and was 
ordered approved. 

An Estate of from 300 to 400 acres, with farm 
buildings, live stock, and implements, for Illustration 
in agriculture, horticulture, stock-growing, and other 
rural affairs. 

College Buildings for lecture and recitation rooms, 
library, museums of natural history and of farm imple- 
ments and products, chemical laboratories, halls for 
exhibitions and military drill, armory, chapel, rooms 
for the president, librarian and other officers, with 
dormitories for such students only as cannot be other- 
wise accommodated. 

A President who shall reside on the farm. He 
shall control all the affairs of the farm under direction 
of the trustees, whom he shall represent in all mat- 
ters not otherwise provided for. 

A Faculty composed of the president and resident 
professors, who shall administer such rules of govern- 
ment, and carry out such course of study as shall be 
established ; and make and execute all other regula- 
tions necessary to proper order and discipline. 

A Farm Superintendent, who shall, under direction 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



of the president, manage all the affairs of the farm 
and direct the labor thereon, except such labor of stu- 
dents as the faculty may place under control of pro- 
fessors and others. 

The following departments under such professors 
and assistants as may be necessary : 

A Department of Agriculture and Horticulture and 
Law relating to Rural Affairs of which the president 
shall be professor. 

A Department of Physics, Mathematics and Engi- 
neering, including Astronomy, Construction, Land- 
scape Gardening, Hydrodynamics, Pneumatics, Cli- 
matology and Drawing. 

A Department of Natural History Including Miner- 
alogy, Botany, Zoology and Geology. 

A Department of Chemistry. 

A Department of Political Economy, of Intellect- 
ual Philosophy, Christian Morals and the Evidence of 
Natural and Revealed Religion. 

A Department of Comparative Anatomy and Ani- 
mal Physiology including Veterinary Medicine and 
Surgery. 

A Department of Modern Languages and 
Literature. 

A Department of Physical Education including 
Military Tactics. 

The Course of Study to be four years. Provision 
for shorter elective courses may be made by the 
trustees. 

For admission, students to be sixteen years of age 
and to pass such examination as is required for 
admission to our Normal Schools, and such further 
examination as the trustees may from time to time 
prescribe. 

Manual Labor to be required of every student as 
may be arranged by the faculty, who may allow com- 
pensation for extra work. 

Tuition to be fixed by the trustees, with such free 
scholarships as may be established by public and pri- 
vate bounty. 

The Trustees in presenting the foregoing Plan of 
Organization and Course of Study wish to have it 
understood that the same is, from the necessity of the 
case, general in its character, but constructed with 
the sole reference of establishing an institution which 
shall fairly realize the design of the Act of Congress 
and the Acts of the Legislature creating the same 



and nothing beyond ; — and with the expectation that 
experience will suggest changes hereafter to be made 
by the Board of Trustees subject to the approval of 
the Governor and Council. 

President French in commenting on this matter in 
his annual report of January. 1866, said that it had 
"seemed to the trustees desirable that their plan of 
organization should be early established, in order not 
only that their buildings and farm might be arranged 
in conformity with it ; but that they might publicly 
and officially answer the frequent and reasonable 
inquiries as to what they proposed to do for agricul- 
ture and education, by means of the college." He 
said further that "Our college is to be established as 
a part of a great scheme of public education ; not in 
opposition to our grammar schools and high schools, 
but in harmony with them: not as a rival to our other 
excellent colleges, but as a co-worker with them in a 
common cause." 

At a meeting of the trustees on Feb. 6. 1867, it 
was voted that the college be opened the 2nd of 
October, that the number and length of the terms be 
referred to the executive committee, and that the 
room rent in the college be $15 a year. In August, 
the age at which students might be admitted to the 
Freshman Class was fixed at 1 4 years instead of 1 6 
years. 

It is interesting to note that the corporation, on 
June 14, 1864, adopted as its common seal a plain 
round stamp with the words "The Massachusetts 
Agricultural College" in a circle thereon and the fig- 
ures "1863" within the circle. 

Also that the Legislature of 1866 constituted the 
State Board of Agriculture a Board of Overseers of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College, with powers 
and duties to be defined and fixed by the governor 
and council, but said board should have no powers 
granted to control the action of the trustees of said 
college, or to negative their powers and duties. By 
this act the Board of Agriculture was authorized to 
locate the State agricultural cabinet and library and 
to hold its meetings at the college. It also made the 
president of the college a member ex officio of the 
Board of Agriculture. 



Ex-73. — B. A. Clapp made a recent visit to 
Amherst. 



A FRIEND OF THE COLLEGE. 

In the death of Mrs. Louise S. Baker on Monday, 
March 9, the students lost one of their best friends. 
She was a woman of remarkable characteristics in 
many ways. Her strong individuality made her 
known to generations of college men. Many of the 
older graduates will greatly regret to hear of her death. 
Concerning her character and her relation to M. A. 
C. the Springfield Union has a striking account which 
follows in part : 

When the Agricultural College was first estab- 
lished a part of her father's farm was bought by the 
trustees. Living at the entrance to the college 
grounds she watched every step in the growth of the 
institution and took a personal interest in teachers and 
students. She had no children of her own and was 
left a widow so that she delighted in acting a mother's 
part toward boys who came to college determined to 
pay their own bills so far as possible. She opened 
her house to such and always had one or more occupy- 
ing rooms under her roof. She gave them employ- 
ment and looked sharply after their conduct and habits. 
Her ways of expressing interest in them were peculiar 
and those who could not understand her motives found 
it difficult to please her. Those who won her appro- 
bation however, found her to be a friend who never 
forgot them and kept up her interest in them during 
all their future course. 

The number of "Aggie" boys whom she has helped 
in one way or another is unknown to any except those 
who knew her well. Many of them she helped finan- 
cially to secure their education at M. A. C. She 
advanced them money to complete their pro- 
fessional studies in universities and in some cases 
welcomed their sons when they, too, came to their 
father's college. 

Her New England thrift led her to live a simple 
life, to take good care of her patrimony, and to con- 
demn idleness, extravagance and all forms of dissipa- 
tion. She took good care of her pennies and wasted 
nothing. But she saved that she might give gener- 
ously to good objects and to worthy people. She 
looked well after her own rights ; alone in the world 
she was compelled to do so. But she was ready to 
do justice to others. Instead of wasting today she 
had an eye upon tomorrow and planned that her work 



should be continued after her death. 

So with her usual wisdom she settled it in her will 
that every year the income of $6000 shall be given 
by the majority vote of the faculty of the Agricultural 
College to aid "poor, industrious and deserving 
students to obtain an education in said college. 

Her heart also went out to poor, industrious and 
deserving students in Amherst college and she left 
$4000, the income of which is to be used for their 
assistance. She gave this money not to keep her 
name before the public but to honor the memory of 
her father. 

The church and the Sunday school were not for- 
gotten. She knew how difficult it is in these days to 
maintain these institutions. As present supporters 
die. their places are not filied. So she provided that 
her contributions should never be lacking. In a 
similar manner she provided for the poor in New 
York city, for the colored people of the South, for 
struggling churches in the West and for home 
missions. 

Her example is one worthy of many followers. It 
suggests a method by which New England principles 
and character may be continued in power and in insti- 
tutions of the fathers maintained in this transition 
period when the problems of the city and country are 
pressing for solution. The church, the Sunday school, 
the education of the industrious ana deserving poor in 
state and endowed colleges, the transformation of city 
slums, the care of immigrants and the evangelization 
of the waste places on the frontier will surely be well 
cared for when the example of Louisa Baker shall be 
followed by the widows of New England and her spirit 
shall move the business men of the land. 



A BOOK ON RURAL PROGRESS. 

The following review, occurring in the Sunday 
Republican, March 15, seemed so good that we quote 

it bodily. 

President Kenyan L. Butterfield of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College has published through 
the university of Chicago press "Chapters in Rural 
Progress." One might infer that it is designed for 
country readers, but also it is well worth the attention 
of sociologists in both city and country ; and since the 
agricultural interests of the nation are still dominant, 
the capital invested being almost as great as the com- 



xo 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



bined capital of railroad and manufacturing industries, 
rural progress has a vital connection with the welfare of 
the country as a whole. This book is not a cry of ' ' Back 
tothesoil," which has been frequently heard in re- 
cent years 5 rather it is a study of the welfare and 
prosperity of those who have always stayed by the soil. 
It is a call to the farmer on the back road and the 
market gardener close to the city to get together ; 
co-operation is one of the watchwords of the new 
farming. But it is not in any narrow spirit 
that President Butterfield advocates and urges co- 
operation ; he is a prophet with deeper insight into 
rural needs than to be content with large crops and 
record prices ; most of all he is concerned with the 
personality, character and highest well-being of the 
farmer himself and his family. "The farmer is of 
more consequence than the farm, and should be first 
improved." "Improved agriculture is a matter of 
fertile brain rather than of fertile field." "The im- 
proved acre must yield not only corn but civilization, 
not only potatoes but culture, not only wheat but ef- 
fective manhood." 

For bringing about the ideals of rural progress there 
must be a co-operation not alone of the farmers in 
organizations like the grange, but of the church and 
school as well. These three are a trinity of uplifting 
agencies; united they march, divided they limp along. 
An interesting chapter describes the " Hesperia 
movement." so named from the Michigan town where 
the teachers asked the farmers to meet with them 
in a teachers' and Patrons' association, meeting on 
Saturdays in the winter months, to the social and 
literary edification of both classes and a bridging 
of the chasm that sometimes intervenes. 

Among the agencies of progress, a division occu- 
pying half the volume, the chapter headings are : 
"Education for the Farmer," " Farmer's Institutes," 
*' The Hesperia Movement, "The Rural School and 
the Community," "The Grange," "Opportuni- 
ties for Farm Women," and " The Country Church 
and Progress". Later the author discusses "Forward 
Steps," among which is a chapter of special interest 
locally," The needs of New England Agriculture.'' 
These needs are adaptation and co-operation. Adap- 
tation concerns the farmer's relation to his market. 
"New England Farmers have the most superb 
markets in the country." While we have heard 



much about New England being a good place to be 
born in, if one emigrated young to the western land 
of promise, a table of comparative statistics reveals 
a new side of the local farm problem. New England 
collectively is about the same size as Michigan, an 
average, and Iowa, the foremost agricultural state. 
The figures for New England and Michigan run fairly 
close, but while the value of products an acre of im- 
proved land is $12 in both these western states, in 
New England it is $20. 

The closing pages suggest an outline of a course 
for rural sociology, an untitled field in education, and 
bring down to date the record of attempts at federa- 
tion for rural progress, the latest of which was held 
at Amherst last October under President Butterfield's 
leadership, with the co-operation of agricultural, civic, 
religious, educational and library organizations. It is 
safe to say that when this book shall have obtained 
a somewhat general reading among classes con- 
cerned in rural progress a meeting like that at Am- 
herst can be duplicated with far more of intelligence 
and enthusiasm on the part of some of the recent 
participants. 



AGRICULTURE. 

In a recent test, the M. A. C. barn was given a 
score of 98^ out of a possible 100^. The test was 
made by a government expert who made the score 
from a detail score card compiled by the Department 
of Agriculture. 

All the milk sent out by the Farm Department is 
now certified and sent to Boston. Also a specialty 
of steamer milk is being made. This has been done 
successfully elsewhere but by very few. It is very 
difficult to obtain the class of milk necessary for the 
steamer trade. Cleanliness in every detail must be 
followed out. Besides this cows must be selected at 
the proper period of lactation when the fats and solids 
not fats are in about the same proportion in order to 
obtain the poorest medium for growth of bacteria. 
Ivan C. Weld, government expert, scored a bottle of 
milk drawn Feb. 16 and opened March 12, giving it a 
score of 95^.. The milk at this time was perfectly 
sweet. 



' 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



it 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

The Keuffel & Esser Co., of New York, the 
largest manufacturers of drawing and surveying Instru- 
ments in America, have arranged to manufacture 
and sell the new plane table recently patented by 
Professor Waugh. 

The landscape gardening department is giving its 
annual exhibition of Corot pictures. Corot is consid- 
ered to have been a master painter of landscapes, 
and the students in landscape gardening study his 
works in order to learn something about composition 
and something of how an artist sees landscapes. 

Following the study of Corot's pictures the senior 
landscape gardening students will have a look at some 
modern American landscape pictures. These will 
come in the form of a photographic salon now being 
arranged for April. Professor Waugh belongs to sev- 
eral photo-art clubs and has many acquaintances 
among the leading art photographers of the country. 
These friends are all being laid under contributions 
for the landscape salon, and the exhibit promises to 
be an instructive and entertaining affair. 



Alumni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 16, 1908. For particulars and invitations 
address, Harold Allen, Amherst. 

'73. — S. S. Warner has been elected Secretary of 
the Board of Superintendents of the Smith Agricul 
tural School at Northampton. 

'74. - John M. Benedict, flourishing physician, 
18 Main St,, Waterbury. Conn. 

'75. — H. S. Carruth has been reappointed assist- 
ant penal commissioner of the city of Boston. During 
the recent investigation of this department by the 
Finance Commission Mr. Carruth came through with 
unblemished reputation and Mayor Hibbard was 
criticised by the Boston papers for not awarding him 
the full commlssionship. 

'92. — H. M. Thomson formerly of Thompson, 
Conn., has moved to his recently purchased farm at 
Mill Valley, Amherst. 

'93. — Charles A. Goodrich is a rapidly rising phy- 
sician at Hartford, Conn., 61 North Beacon St. 



TALK 



won't impress you much. 
Even the poorest hats are spoken of well in their own advertisments 
But if you come in and try on one of OUR HATS— that's different 
We have them all : in brown, pearl, gazelle, coco, acme, white or black, 
soft and stiff. 

Every hat we sell is guaranteed to do its duty. 
Spring line ready for inspection. 

Ahfc/s vfckomc-bityorQet 
Amherst IIoisk Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






the: 
DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LAN5INU, MICHIGAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOk COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT course: MEirsI 
I place butter Makers, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. (). FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'5 

TAILOR STOHQ 
II AMITY Dim, . AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 





f 




Four First Class Barbers 



( Ipen Mondays from 


7 


A . M . 


to 8 


P. M. 


Tuesdays 


7 


II 


6 


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Wednesdays, 


7 


1 1 


8 


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Thursdays, 


7 


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6 


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Fridays, 


7 


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8 


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Saturdays, 


7 


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JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. (Iloves, Sheets. Tillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels, 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



GOODS FOR MEN 




C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 

FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMIIEKST. MA 

RaWsTnS 

oi.l South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

Modem Improvement*, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." atop with us. 



THE BKST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY 

R. J. RAHAR. 



GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

Cannot be Manufactured. 
It is a Natural Manure. 

(/rote* Strong, Viyorous, Healthy Plant* 'that llitist Disrasr 
DK. UEOBUK K. STOVE, Professor of llotany at the Marnt. 
Aki 'leultural College, Mini Professor of Plant M WH I I »ttb* 
Htttch Experiment Station, Amherst, Mas*., writes to our 
Agricultural Kxpert as follow - 

"I will lay thut 1 consider the foi inula which you 

{irepareil for M r. Prescott ami applied liy linn on lilt* 
leils was very effectual in controlling the asparanu* 
mat. The appl leation of your formula anil other fen 
turea which were carried out in the iininaKciucnt of 
tbeae beds convince me that it constituted the l>r-i 
demonstration of the control of aaparagus rust which 
haa ever been made in tills country." 
UKNUIMC PERUVIAN GUANO formed the baais of the 
above nienlioned formula. It was used on the aaparaxu* tied* 
of C, W. PhbbCOTT., Concord, Mans., tiie largest individual 
grower of Asparagus in New Knglantl. We also offer 

WE ALSO OFFKK 

Nitrate of Soda, Basic Slag, 

Potash Salts and all Fertilizing Materials 

at Lowest Prices. 

We distribute fertilizlnK materials from New York. Boston, 

M asn., anil Charleston, 8. C. 

Our beautifully Illustrated 80 page book on " Plant Food 

Problems," la sent free of charge. 



THE COE-MORTIMER CO., 

Sole Importers for It. 8. of CJeniiliie Peruvian Ouauo, and 
Manufacturers of High Grade Fertilizers. 

33-137 Front Street, New York City, i 



44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKERS 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 




In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. T hey 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Hall, Basket Ball, 
KunningShoes .Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers. Jerseys, etc. Our 
goods have character 
— our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue It h free to any address. 

WRIGHT •* DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

18 WEST 30TH ST, NEW YORK 

Chicago Providkm f, K. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




When thinking of establishing A HOME OF 
YOUR OWN it would simply be wisdom to get 
acquainted with the merits of 

A First-Class Sewing Machine 

i.ik i 

THE NEW DOMESTIC. 

SOLD i;v 
I£. A. THOMPSONf 

Hear First National Bank, AMHKKS I 




Gaps and Gotcns 

Makers to 06, 07, 08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS A VINING. 

Ml Fourth Ave , Nkw Yokk. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic lilock, near Depot, Open everyday. 

I.uucuex, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted (or ita excellent 
Oyster Stew ami Claw Chowder. 

Cloned only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAMDFACTUKKK OF 

»OI3A WATERS, 

Pineapple, I. anion and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ala. Fountain* c barged to order 

KIVEK STBKBT, NoKTHAMrioN. Mill 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence, 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST. 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

Has received the latest fabric* for the spring ami summer 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

JkfMllitary Work a Specialty .^g£ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amherst, Mass. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 

AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

M.A.C. Atf't, II.M.jKXMNOX.'ON 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

P&SATI8FACTION aUARANTBBD. » 'r^- 
H. A. VTLEY, Manager. 

office : 

East ZPleasstnt Street. 

Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT the 

COLLEGE STORE. 



The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothes are made on the New Home sawim; 
Machine, which fact, assure* them of no "rips." Mother!* 
should get one at once as It will do for their children in year* 
to come. Dealers Kvery where. 




AMHEHBT DIVISION. 

Cars will leave Amhemt au<t Northampton ou the hour ami 
hair hour from 6.3(» a. m. till lO.top.M. Sundays the first ear 
will leave at 8.30 a.m. 

Main officio, Ukkknhii.h, Mass. 

John A. Tainan, supt. 

Southampton OFFICE, HW Main St. 

( W. Clapp, Asst Supt. Telephone, Northampton, \-a \-:. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To sare your sole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a speclalt> . 

CHARLES DORAY, 

OfposITE Town Hall. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Co. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and II 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO JAN. 1, ISO*. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield, 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albana, Vt. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, I). D. S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

I CTI.KK'S Itl.OC K, AMIIKUST, MANN, 



O. ft, OATE8, !>.!>.«. 

DEJMTALi ROOMS, 

<ll I. Mis HI.OCE, AMHERST, MASS 

E. B. DICKINBDN, D. B. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' III.OCE, • - AMHKKST. MAMS. 

officii iiuhkh 

S TO 12 A.. M., 1-30 TO 6 J». lO.. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide tiaa administered wheu desired. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHKKST. MASS. 



Bring your pictures to 
us to be framed. 



WE HAVE STARTED A CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 

Have all the latest books of fiction. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 

C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT OK ItlTMirVI?^^. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 




spring. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Aid II UK E. Dokk. 



L. II. TOUKTKLOTTK. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALKKS AMD .IUBKKKS IN 

POULTRY AND QAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 



High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Maiu St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



Corner North and Union St*., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



FHOTOGKAFHIC STUDIO 

Society, Clam and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



142 Main Street, 



Northampton, Ma.hs. 



Tel. 332-2. 



THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




I II K I.AUl.K.sl COLI.KOK ENGRAV- 
INti HOI'SK. IN THK WORLD. 



Works: 11th Street & LeW Ave, 
G PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for A nnuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catxlogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College, 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NKAK EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST. MASS 

J. H.TROTT 



PLUPIBEB, STERN I GflS FITTER, 

AND DEALER IK STOVES AND MUSES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE >ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETK LINK OF 0O0D8 
8UITKD TO THK STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



E. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL' 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TKaDE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST., 



TURNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. 



Daily and Sunday Papers. 



ESTABLISHED 1*61. 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Thin! Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPOKTKK8 AND MANUPACTUKKKS OP 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GhOOIDS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 

HOTEL HAMILTON^ 

HOLYOKE, MAS8. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



CAKWNta & AOWHOUS*. 



AttHftST, Mass. 









flfoaesacbusetts 



Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



SHORT COURSES &f» follows : 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 



(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. 
continues two weeks. 



Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 



2. A POUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. A choice of one of the following courses is 
allowed for Junior year : Agriculture, Horticulture, Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Land- 
scape Gardening. For Senior year a student must elect, from the following, three courses 
closely correlated with his Junior year course : Agriculture, Horticulture, Veterinary, Botany, 
Landscape Gardening, Entomology, Chemistry, Physics, Engineering, English, French, Ger 
man, Latin. Only one course in language can be elected. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of M aater of Science 
And Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Bctterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



'HE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'OI_- 18 



NO. 13 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 






AMHERST, MASS.. APRIL 22, 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything yon need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR _ PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 




E. E. MILLET! , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, WAMDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 

OCCULISTS PEBSCRtFTIOKl FILLED. 



GO TO .... 



page's Shoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 



Repairing done by power machines, as 



good a^ new. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly clone at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 



Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. APRIL 22, 1908 



NO. 13 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication* should be addresaed. Collbob Signal Amhimt Mass. Tub Sional will be 
tent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Buaineas Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRICCS. 1909. Business Manager. 
E. F. DAMON. 1910 Assistant Business Manager. 
R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Notes. W.R.CLARKE. 1910. Department Notes. 

W. E. ADAMS. 1909, Alumni Notes. L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes 

C. H. WHITE. 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes. H A. BROOKS 1910. Special. 

R. N. HALLOWELL. 1911. 
S R. PARSONS. 1911 



Term*: $1.00 per near in sdesnes. Single Copies. IOc. Postage outside o» United States and Canada, ttsc. extra 



Athletic Board. 
Foot- Bali Association. 
Basket -Ball Association. 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson, Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager. 
College Senate. 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Indei 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Gillett. President 



J. R. Parker. Pres. 

R. D. Lul'. Manager 

C. H. White. Pres 

H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as seoond-clasa matter, Post Office at Amherst 



__d.-tbr._iis. 



The publication of this issue of The Signal has 
been delayed one week in order that the remaining 
issues might appear regularly with a commencement 
number June 17. 



In looking over the pages of that representative 
agricultural weekly, the New England Homestead, a 
few days ago, there came to notice the following com- 
munication from a Connecticut man, headed "The 
Boy and the Farm." He writes: "As I read the 
farm papers, study books and observe agricultural 
methods, I ask myself the question. Cannot the agri- 
cultural colleges accomplish more in showing the 
average boy and young man how to manage a farm 
successfully? This Is what the state and nation give 
money to accomplish, to teach young men how to 
farm successfully. I notice In many cases graduates 
of agricultural colleges have the theory of agriculture 
and some general scientific knowledge, but their 
knowledge of practical farming seems rather rudi- 



mentary. Farming is a complicated business and 
one to be thoroughly successful must serve a faithful 
apprenticeship. Most of us do things as we are 
trained, and young men in our colleges should be 
shown how to manage a farm with a small amount of 
capital rather than a large amount. I think it would 
be a good plan for the various professors at our col 
leges to take their classes visiting among the farms 
in neighboring towns and thus get in closer touch with 
the actualities." 

Have we really this question to meet? Are we 
drifting away from the practice too far today and 
becoming theorists? Shall we follow the course of 
training laid down by the first trustees of our college 
and generally understood at that time as the means 
to an end, namely agricultural education, or shall we 
strive toward the goal set by William H. Bowker in 
his speech on anniversary day, last fall? The found- 
ers of the college believed that manual labor as well 
as mental training should be required. Yet Mr. 
Bowker. a member of the very first class to graduate 
from the institution, today prophesies that we have yet 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



broader problems to solve than with which till now 
we have not attempted to cope. These will com- 
mand brain rather than muscle in their solution. 
We are rapidly trending toward that very position 
among the colleges of the country where our relations 
to agriculture shall be similar to the relations that 
exist between the highest institutions of learning and 
the walks in life for which they prepare. More 
especially under the present administration are we 
seeking greater things. It is the direct result of 
growth, in numbers of students, resources and equip- 
ment and in the new light by which the common- 
wealth is beginning to view the college. But, after 
all we may say, we cannot help feeling that such a 
query as the one quoted brings us to task and affords 
material for consideration. It is a candid, honest 
opinion and is worthy of more thought. 



Athletic No-tts- 



A TESTIMONIAL. 

It is gratifying to receive sentiment like the fol- 
lowing, which ought to stir the loyalty of every alum- 
nus to responsive action: 

"I think The College Signal equal to any publi- 
cation of its class as a college periodical. Have 
been a subscriber ever since my graduation in '94 and 
must say that I do not see how any alumnus can do 
without it." 



FREE SCHOLARSHIPS RAISED. 

The committee on ways and means have reported 
to the House of Representatives a resolve raising the 
number of free scholarships in the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College from 80 to 120. or three instead 
of two in each senatorial district. The following 
appropriations were authorized in a report made April 
6: Theoretical and practical education, $30,000; 
further maintenance. $12,000, of which $5000 is to 
be maintained as a labor fund for needy students ; 
short courses in agriculture, $5000 ; normal depart- 
ment, $5000; veterinary department, $1000; agri- 
cultural experiment station; $10,500: analyses and 
carrying out regulations relative to commercial feed- 
stuffs, $3000: heating and lighting. $500: dining 
hall, $500. 



— Turner '09 has done quite a bit of work in line 
of track application. A place for high jumps and 
broad jumps is already completed. Progression in 
all things is good to look upon. 



BASEBALL. 

The reports given below of the two games already 
played need little comment. They show that the 
team is capable of very strong work on the diamond, 
but that it has moments of weakness which are often 
fatal to success. These bad innings will undoubtedly 
become more rare as the season advances. 

The vacancy in the center garden is well filled by 
the spare pitcher. Tilton is doing good work at third. 
The backstopping of French is good. also. The rest 
of the team is practically the same as last year's. 

R. 1. College, 4; M. A. C, 3. 

The following account of the game is taken from 
the Providence Journal: 

" In a fast and exciting battle Rhode Island Col- 
lege won from the strong Massachusetts Agricultural 
College nine. 4 to 3, Friday afternoon, at Kings- 
ton, the game being played during light showers, 
which made very disagreeable baseball weather. 
Both nines put up a very good article of ball, Rhode 
Island especially, it being the first game that the 
home team has played this season. 

Miller pitched good ball for the home team, allow- 
ing no hits and striking out two, while Moyer made a 
capital backstop, putting out a man at the home 
plate and holding some wild pitches at critical points 
of the game. 

Hubbard was on the rubber for the visitors, and de- 
livered good, consistent ball, striking out seven men 
and keeping the hits well scattered. Five errors were 
made by each side during the game, Smith and 
O'Donnell being responsible for two apiece. 

For the first three innings neither side scored, and 
only one Massachusetts man reached first base, that 
being on four balls. He was thrown out by the 
catcher at the second corner. In the fourth Inning, 
when Furber was put in for Rhode Island, the first 
man struck out and a bunching of four hits netted 
the visitors two runs. Two other men were thrown 
out at the first bag. No more scoring was done till 
the sixth Inning, when two hits and an error allowed 
one run for Massachusetts, making the score 3 to 
in their favor. 

A batting rally in the eighth, assisted by an error 



on the part of the visitors, allowed Rhode Island to 
get four men over the plate, thus winning the game 
handily by one run. The visitors played a fast, snappy 
game, but went to pieces at times and made some 
costly wild throws. 
The score : 



P.HODB ISLAND l/OLLBGK 









A.*. 


■. 


r.o. 


A. 


E. 


F. Smith, 2, 






3 


1 


2 





1 


Warner, m.. p. 






4 


2 


1 





1 


Tully, s., 






4 


1 


3 


6 


1 


Drew. 3. 






4 








1 





Whipple. 1. 






4 





II 








Moyer. C, 






4 


1 


8 


2 





Craig, 1.. 
Mitchell, r . 






4 
2 




1 


1 







2 



Miller, p.. 






1 














Furber, p., 
H . Smith, m.. 






1 





1 


2 


U 






3 














Totals. 






34 


6 


27 


1 1 


B 




MASSACHUSETTS. 
















A.S. 


a. 


P.O. 


A. 


K. 


O'Donnell, s. 






3 





1 


1 


1 


Shattuck. 2. 






4 


1 


3 


1 


/ 


Cobb, m.. 






S 





2 








Tilton. 3, 






4 


1 





2 


1 


Hubbard, p., 
O Grady, 1.. 






5 


1 


1 


3 









5 


1 


1 








Johnson. 1. 






4 


1 


9 








F. Warren, r., 






2 





1 








French, c. 






4 


1 


9 





1 


Totals. 






36 


b 


27 


7 


5 


Innings. 


1 1 


3 


4 5 


6 


7 


8 9 




Rhode Island. 

















4 


4 


Massachusetts. 








2 


1 





0- 


- 3 



Stolen bases — O'Donnell, Tilton, Warner. Moyer, Tulley2, Craig. Mitch- 
ell. E. Smith. Two-base hits— Hubbard, O'Grady. Sacrifice hits— Drew, 
Whipple. Struck out-By Hubbard 7 : by Miller 2 ; by Furber 3 ; by War- 
ner 5, First base on balls— Off Hubbard 2 : off Miller 2 : off Furber 3 ; 
off Warner 1. Umpire— Molloy. 

M. A. C, 6; Brown, 3. 

When the above result reached college late Satur- 
day night, there was something doing immediately. 
The chapel bell was rung for an hour, two bonfires 
were built, rifle volleys were fired, and a parade 
headed by the band was marched around the cam- 
pus, calling on members of the faculty, who re- 
sponded with appropriate speeches. 

From the Springfield Republican. 

"The Massachusetts Agricultural College took a 
somewhat loosely played game from Brown at Provi- 
dence Saturday afternoon, 5 to 3. A high wind 
which swept over the field made fielding difficult, 
and all of Brown's runs were due to errors on this 
account. Cobb proved altogether too much for the 
home players, and it was with great difficulty that 
they secured two hits. The visitors scored six runs 
and Brown one in the sixth inning, and in the seventh 
Brown took two more. This was all the scoring done 
in the game. 



In the sixth inning Nourse gave a free pass, Reg 
nler made a costly error, giving O'Donnell a base. 
Two bunts were foozled, which let in two runs. Til- 
ton hammered out a clean single, which Hennessey 
might have gotten had not the wind carried the ball 
way off its course. This hit sent in two runs. Hub- 
bard pulled out a hit, netting two more runs. Reg- 
nler was passed in the seventh and stole second. 
French threw wild, the ball going into center field 
and Regnler came home. Mayhew and Budlong 
were given passes in the eighth and forced home by 
a string of errors. No hits were obtained in this 
inning by Brown. The Massachusetts players made 
good with the bat and found no difficulty in connect- 
ing when necessary, especiail) in the sixth. Dennie 
starred for Brown, taking several hard catches in 
center field." 

The score: 



O'Donnell, s.. 
Shattuck. 2. 
Cobb, p., 
Tilton. 3. 
Hubbard, m., 
O'Grady. L, 
Johnson. I. 
Warner, r., 
French, c. 

Totals, 



Buss, I.. 
Hennessey, r.. 
Re^nier, 2. 
Raymond, c 
Mumerty. I 
Dennie, m. 
Budlong, 3. 
Mayhew. s., 
Nourse, p., 

Totalb. 

Innings. 
Massachusetts. 
Brown, 



• HUSKTTS. 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 



34 



A.M. 

4 
3 
3 

4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 

32 



I 






2 





3 











5 





I 


'I 
I 
I 

I) 

I 
I 
1 






I 
I 


o 






b 
6 




P.O. 

2 

2 

2 


13 

8 

27 



P.O. 



2 
8 
8 
5 
2 
I 


26 

7 

1 



4 
7 

4 





I 

18 



A. 


u 
2 
I 




I 

3 

4 

I I 
8 9 

2 0- 



>. 


1 
I 





3 



I 



, 



I 
I 



o 



I 
I 





Runs— O Donnell. Shattuck. O Grady. Johnson, Warner. French. Reg- 
nier. Budlong. Mayhew' Stolen bases— Hubbard, Regnier. Minnerty. Den- 
nie. Sacrifice hits— O'Donnell, French, Nourse. Struck out— By Cobb 8. 
by Nourse 8. First base on balls -off Cobb S, off Nourse b. Hit by 
pitcher— By Cobb, Regnier. Time of game -2 h. 30 m. Umpire — Rud 
erham. Attendance— 500. 'Bunted third strike. 

The complete baseball schedule for the season is 
given below. 

SCHEDULE OF GAMES. 

April 10. Rhode Island College at Kingston. 

1 1. Brown at Providence. 

18. Amherst at Amherst. 

25. Springfield Training School at M A. C. 

30. Norwich University at M. A. C. 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



May 2. Open. 

9. Worcester P. I. at Worcester. 

12. University of Vermont at M. A. C. 
16. Conn. Agricultural College at Storrs. 
23. Dartmouth at Hanover. 

29. Norwich University at Northfield. 
30 (a. m.). Univ. of Vermont at Burlington. 
30 (p. m.). Univ. of Vermont at Burlington. 
June 3. Springfield Training School at Springfield. 

5. Holy Cross at Worcester. 

6. Boston College at Boston. 

13. Boston College at M. A. C. 

NOTES. 

The regular assembly. April 8, was a mass meet- 
ing in the interests of college athletics. Many sub- 
jects of interest were brought up for discussion. The 
question of athletic taxes was raised, and the present 
system of levying a separate tax for each line of ath- 
letics condemned. As a substitute for this, it was 
voted to levy a tax of $10 each fall on each man be- 
fore he can enroll as a student here. This will elim- 
inate tax-dodging. 

The advisability of holding an outdoor track meet 
this spring was discussed at some length. It could 
and would be held very successfully if we only had 
the track. This statement was proved true last win- 
ter at the indoor meet. It was finally voted to hire, 
if possible, the use of Pratt Field for one day this 
spring. May 2 has been left open by the baseball 
management, and that day may be utilized for the 
purpose of holding an interclass meet. 

Collet N <>*<$. 



— Wheeler 1911 has left college. 

— The course in Mineralogy closed for the Juniors 
on April 14. 

— On Monday. April 6, the seniors appeared in 
caps and gowns. 

— F. A. Johnson '03 is confined to his room on 
account of illness. 

— President Butterfield spoke before the Danvers 
Grange, April 7th. 

— Professor White lectured in Holliston, Mass., 
the first week in April. Mr. Pomeroy operated the 
lantern. 



— H. T. Wheeler '08 is still at home owing to 
the illness of his mother. 

— Dr. Stone lectured before the Grange organiza- 
tion of Leominister on April 8th 

— S. J. Wright '08 has completed arrangements 
for his work with Mark Brown ex- '08. 

— W. K. Cooper gave an interesting talk before 
the students in chapel on Sunday, April 5th. 

— The selectmen of Amherst have appointed Pro 
fessor George E. Stone as forest fire warden. 

— H. C.Chase '08 and C. R. Webb '09 have 
returned to college after a long period of sickness. 

— D. P. Miller '08 is at present working on 
forestry at Shawnee on the Delaware, Pennsylvania 

— G. R. Cobb who has been working for a land- 
scape gardening firm in Rochester, N. Y.. has re- 
turned to college. 

— Miss Cornelia B. Ball, secretary of the Horti 
cultural Division, who has been sick with the grippe 
for nearly two weeks, has resumed her duties. 

— Professor F. C. Sears gave an address upon the 
subject of joint cultivation before a Farmers' Insti 
tute held by the Eastern Hampden Agricultural Society 
at Brimfield, April 7. 

— The battalion has started the work of the spring 
in earnest. If appearance counts for anything the 
best drilled battalion for years will be put on the field 
for Commencement. Inspection by the U. S. Gov- 
ernment inspector will probably take place the latter 
part of May. 

— The student body was glad of an opportunity 
to celebrate the victory over Brown University, April 
1 1 . Volleys were fired by several of the members 
of the battalion. Two large bonfires furnished light 
for the occasion. The band turned out and the 
students marched to Professors Hasbrouck's and 
Brooks' houses where they were given a short talk. 
Mr. Rowe of the dining hall also spoke later In the 

evening. 

^ 

Amherst, March 25, 1908. 
This certifies that I have examined the books and 
vouchers of the College Signal for the year 1 907-8 
and find recorded, assets amounting to $386.50; no 
liabilities; a cash balance of $2.63, and an appro 
pnation of $28.50 to the College Y. M. C. A. 

H. T. Fernald. Auditor. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



I Y- M. C A. Notes. 






At a meeting of the members of the Association 
held April 5th in the chapel, the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year: — Charles H. 
White. '09, President ; Robert D. Lull, '09, Vice- 
President ; William E. Adams, '09, Corresponding 
Secretary; Walter R. Clark. '10. Secretary; 
Arthur W. Holland, 10, Treasurer. In accordance 
with the constitution of the association the remaining 
officers and committees will be appointed by the 
President and his cabinet. 

R. D. Lull and C. H. White represented the col- 
lege association at the Eastern Presidents' Confer- 
ence held recently at Yale University, New Haven. 
The purpose of the conference was to discuss the 
methods and problems of the various college associa- 
tions and to arrange for the work of the ensuing col- 
lege year by impressing upon the newly-elected 
officers the importance of their work and how their 
interests might be promoted through co-operation 
with their brother college associations and the 
•hub," the International Association. The confer- 
ence lasted for three days and nearly all of the New 
England college Y. M. C. A. 's sent delegates. The 
associations of New York. Pennsylvania and Dela- 
ware were also represented. The delegates report 
that the conference was a success in every sense ot 
the word and that many helpful suggestions were 
gleaned which will aid materially in laying plans for 
the work of the ensuing year. 

The Y. M. C. A. Bible study pursued during the 
winter is being supplemented by a series of brief 
talks about men whose lives illustrate the manly 
virtues as expressed in service to the higher interests 
of human life. These talks are given at 9-15 in the 
chapel each Sunday morning and will continue 
throughout the rest of the semester. On April 5, 
William K. Cooper, Secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
at Springfield, spoke on Father Mathew. Rev. J. 
W. Leonard, Amherst, spoke on Adoniram Judson 
on April 12, and David Livingstone was the subject 
of Prof. W. R. Hart's talk on April 19. The 
remaining dates and speakers will be found in the 
Campus Calendar. The series is aptly entitled 
"Some Modern Heroes." 



April 22. 



April 25. 



April 26 

April 28. 
April 29. 



April 30. 

May 3. 
May 5. 
May 6. 



F. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Assembly. 1-30 — Concert by the College 

Band. 

Natural History Club Speaker. Dr 

Loomis of Amherst. 

Y. M. C. A. 
Baseball— M. A. C. vs. Springfield Trair 

ing School on the Campus. 

Informal Dance. 

Chapel, 9-15 Speaker. Prof. G. 

Mills. Subject, Samuel J. Mills. 
Stockbridge Club -Business Meeting. 
Assembly, I 30 — Speaker. Prof. F. 

Waugh. 

Natural History Club— Speaker. 

Tuckerman of Amherst. 
Baseball — Norwich University vs. M. A. 

C. on the Campus 

Y. M. C. A. 
Chapel. 9-15— Speaker, Prof. G. N. Hol- 

comb. Subject, Arnold Toynbee. 
Stockbridge Club— Speaker, W. D. Hurd, 

University of Maine. 
Assembly — Speaker, President Howard 

Edwards, Rhode Island College of Agri 

culture and Mechanic Arts, Kingston, 

R. I. 

Natural History Club — Speaker. Dr. 

Wilder of Smith College. 



Dr. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



Whereas. It has pleased God in His infinite wisdom to take 
to Himself the father of our friend and brother. William E. 
Adams ; be it 

Resolved. That we. the members of the College Shakes- 
pearean Club, do extend to him and his family our sincerest 
sympathy in this their hour of grief ; and be it further 

Resolved. That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the be- 
reaved family, that a copy be filed in the records of the fra 
ternity, and that a copy be published in the College Signal, 

Carlton C. GowoeY. 
Oscar G. Bartlett, 
Jonathan P. Blaney. 

For the Fraternity. 



Resolved. — That we the class of nineteen hundred nine 
hereby express our heartfelt sympathy to our classmate 
William E. Adams, in his bereavement by the loss of his 
father. 

Resolved — That a copy of these resolutions be sent to 
William and one be published in the College Signal. 

Chas. H White Pres.. j Fof ^ ^^ 
George M. Brown, 1 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87. 
7. Grounds and Buildings. 
The executive committee of the trustees in their 
report to the Legislature in January, 1865, stated 
that 310.55 acres of land in Amherst and Hadley, on 
which were five sets of farm buildings of no permanent 
value, had been bought for the aggregate sum of 
$34,999.50. These several farms were purchased 
from Messrs. Henry Cobb, Chester Cowles. John 
Donahue. D. K. Bangs, L. D. Cowles and J. S. 
Crouch, and in the opinion of the trustees would make 
one of the finest estates for their purposes to be found 
in the Commonwealth. An adjoining tract of about 
73 acres, which it seemed desirable to control for 
the future use of the institution, was bought by the 
treasurer of the college, Dr. Nathan Durfee, with the 
understanding that the college might acquire it if it 
desired. 

The trustees in August, 1865, chose a building 
committee, to whom was given full power to fix and 
determine the location of the buildings, to lay out the 
grounds around the same, and to contract for building 
materials. At this time they favored a college 
building of stone, about 150 by 60 feet, and upon the 
general plan of the drawings presented by the building 
committee. 

A difference of opinion respecting the location of 
the proposed building having arisen, the building com- 
mittee was instructed to procure the services of a 
competent landscape gardener, who, together with 
the architect, should view the grounds and report as 
to the best place for locating the college and farm 
buildings. Messrs. Vaux &. Richards of New York 
were employed for this purpose. Their report was 
somewhat general in character, and. as they said, 
was presented from their special point of view. They 
spoke freely of the whole scheme, with its outgrowths, 
as an artistic composition, that was to be made up of 
principal and subordinate parts. 

In January, 1866, the trustees instructed the build- 
ing committee to locate the proposed college building 
on the plain, near the center of the farm, upon what 
was known as the Chestnut Tree Ridge, south of the 
ravine ; to procure from the architect plans for a 



building suitable to the wants of the college, and also 
a president's house; and to purchase the quarry 
negotiated for by Mr. Hills. 

The report of President French, in January. 1866, 
informs us that most of the estate was leased under 
restrictions securing good husbandry ; that operations 
in ornamental improvement of the grounds had con 
sisted in planting a few hundred evergreens for a screen 
on the easterly side ; that some three thousand small 
trees had been set in nurseries for future use ; and 
that a reservoir had been constructed upon the high- 
est land where water appeared. 

In May the building committee was authorized to 
employ Frederick Law Olmsted of New York as 
landscape gardener to advise about certain approaches 
and the general arrangement of the grounds. His 
quite extended report showed that he was not friendly 
disposed toward the stone building, but rather favorea 
a less formal and rigid plan. However, as no pro- 
posals were made coming within the sum fixed by the 
trustees, further action in regard to said building was 
abandoned. In August the executive committee was 
empowered to lay out tne farm and to make such im- 
provements thereon as they might deem expedient. 

In January, 1867, President Chadbourne sub 
mitted plans for certain buildings, which were adopt 
ed. In his report to the Legislature under that date, 
he spoke of buildings contracted for, the work to be 
completed by the first of Angust. He also stated 
that $10,000 had been pledged the college by Messrs. 
Leonard M. and Henry F. Hills of Amherst, and a 
like amount by Dr. Nathan Durfee of Fall River, for 
the express purpose of establishing and maintaining a 
Botanic Garden. 

On February 6, the executive committee was au 
thorized to set apart such portion of the college farm 
lying east of the old road and south of the grove on 
the Cowles farm as they might judge expedient with 
reference to having the same properly drained and 
fitted by cultivation for the use of the Department of 
Botany and Horticulture. On May 1, Professor 
Clark was invited to lay before the trustees plans of 
a glass structure for the Botanical Department, a 
plant house, etc., and the executive committee was 
authorized to cause the buildings to be erected. 

The expediency of selling a portion of the college 
J farm having been brought before the trustees, report 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



was made in August that it was inexpedient at that 
time to sell any portion of said farm. 

President Clark, in his report to the Legislature in 
January, 1868, referred to the buildings, and said that 
it had been the design of the trustees thus far to 
expend the fund of $75,000, pledged by the town of 
Amherst, for such buildings as were necessary to put 
the college into operation, and try upon a moderate 
scale the experiment about which there had been so 
much discussion, of combining in an educational 
course, theory and practice— scientific culture and 
manual labor. With this object in view they had 
erected a dormitory 100 x 50 feet and four stories 
high, with a basement for fuel. This edifice, besides 
rooms for one professor and forty-six students, con- 
tained two recitation rooms, a reading room and 
library, and two large rooms occupied by the State 
cabinet of specimens illustrating the natural history 
and geology of Massachusetts. This edifice, with 
fixtures for the public rooms, stoves, well and the 
necessary grading and outbuildings, cost $36,280. 
(This building was burned on the morning of February 
4. 1885.) 

Other buildings referred to in this report were : 
A boarding house, furnishing accommodations for a 
family, with a dining-room 50 x 18 feet, total cost. 
$8,180; a chemical laboratory 57 x 46 feet, two 
stories high, total cost, including bell and grading, 
about $10,360; a botanic museum 45 x 31 feet, two 
stories, total cost, including furniture and grading, 
about $5,180 ; the Durfee plant houses, a group of 
glass buildings covering 5,000 square feet of surface 
and heated by hot water, with two propagating pits, 
each 50 x 12 feet, all costing about $12,000. 

Plans and specifications had been procured, and 
the sum of $7 ,000 appropriated, for a model barn 
100 x 50 feet, with 28 foot posts, to stand on the 
western slope of the central ridge of the farm about 
forty rods south of the dormitory. A plan was also 
procured for a prospect tower seventy feet in height, 
to be erected among the trees on the east side of the 
farm. 

The report further stated that with its present 
buildings the college would be able to educate about 
fifty young men, but that another dormitory and other 
buildings would be required if more classes were to 
be admitted. 



A NEW EXPERIMENT STATION. 

Plans are being laid for a branch experiment sta 
tion for the study of tobacco-growing, analogous to 
the one established in the eastern part of the state 
last year, devoted to asparagus culture. On April 
14, Professor Shamel of the Department of Agricul- 
ture, Professor Brooks of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College and tobacco growers of Northampton 
and vicinity held a conference In Northampton for 
the discussion of the proposed tobacco growing exper- 
iment station which will be established at some point 
in this section which is yet to be determined. 

Professor Shamel, who is particularly interested in 
tobacco culture, explained to the growers what the 
government would do toward establishing a station in 
the Connecticut valley. He declared that the gov- 
ernment would pay the salaries of those needed to 
run the station and would provide the equipment, but 
the state would have to furnish a place and guarantee 
the government against loss. He said the govern 
ment was ready to establish a station in this vicinity 
and that Senator Crane was much interested In the 
project. No definite action was taken, however, but 
it is expected that another meeting will be held. 



WITH OUR CO-WORKERS. 

Prof. C. L. Beach has definitely accepted the 
presidency of the Connecticut Agricultural College at 
Storrs, Conn. The board of trustees of the Connec- 
ticut institution announced some time ago their unan- 
imous vote to secure him for the position, if possible. 
He will resign his position at the Vermont State Col- 
lege at Burlington at an early date. Professor 
Beach was head of the dairy division of the Connec- 
ticut Agricultural College before going to Vermont 
about a year ago. He is one of the most popular 
agricultural workers that ever worked in Connecticut ; 
therefore, it is expected he will have the hearty sup- 
port of all interested in rural uplift in the Nutmeg 
state. He succeeds President Stimson, who resigned 
to accept the presidency of the new Smith Agricul- 
tural School at Northampton. 

At the Maine Agricultural College at Orono, fol- 
lowing close upon farmers' week, came the short 
poultry course, when practical and valuable talks and 
demonstrations were given by experts on incubators, 
brooders, diseases, feed, etc. C. K. Graham of the 
Connecticut Agricultural College and A. F. Hunter 
of Abington were among the speakers. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The New England Federation of Agricultural Col- 
leges recently held a meeting in Boston at which the 
working constitution was officially adopted, and the 
society was made a member of the Conference on 
Rural Progress. It is expected that steps will soon 
be made to affiliate the New England Federation of 
colleges with the national organization. The secre- 
tary of the former is G. T. Harrington, Burlington, 
Vt. 



SOME FACTS WORTHY OF NOTICE. 

In its alumni is found the expression of the real 
worth of a college to a community. Just as a factory 
is known by its products rather than by its equipment, 
employees and officials, so a college is known rather 
by the works of those who have been through the mill 
than by the completeness of its laboratories, the com- 
prehensiveness of its libraries, or the efficiency of its 
teaching force. And moreover, the alumni of a col- 
lege of a technical nature, of which the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College is a type, ought to comprise 
almost wholly followers of the various pursuits in life 
for which the college offers preparation. That the 
alumni of a college do not. in altogether too many in- 
stances, pursue the lines of work for which they have 
been trained in college may be attributed to the fact 
that a very large percentage, doubtless more than 
half, of the students entering the freshman class have 
no definite aim or goal in mind. The trouble is. they 
do not obey that precept, " Know thyself . " "What 
are we here for? " may seem a played-out phrase, 
but it surely wears well, since so many fall to answer 
it. A great many college graduates do not, till they 
have launched out on a career, recognize talents in 
their possession which, had they been trained in col- 
lege, would place their possessors in the front ranks 
of the followers of that particular trade or profession. 
It is a human weakness, but must be universally con- 
quered before all the parts of this vast world-society 
shall have adjusted themselves to a uniform social 
movement. 

The accompanying table, computed by one of the 
older alumni, shows many interesting facts concerning 
the living graduates " engaged in the different occu- 
pations which may fairly be regarded as agricultural , 
or very directly connected with agriculture." The 
table is made from the " 1909 Index." The com- 
piler writes: "In looking over the alumni lists, a 
considerable number of names have been found of in- 
dividuals whose occupation is not stated. None of these 
have been included as engaged in any occupation 



connected with agriculture, although It may fairly be 
presumed that some of them are so engaged. . . 
Particular care was taken not to count any man twice. 
If a man was counted in an agricultural college he 
was never also counted in an experiment station, 
and the opposite is also true. The number of mem- 
bers on the list from which my statistics were taken 
given without occupation is 43." 

The table further shows that there are 141 individ 
uals working on farms, either as owners or superln- 
dents. This is about 21 .5 per cent, of the total num- 
ber of living graduates. 



LIVING GRADUATES 



1871- 
1880 



On (arms : 
Owners, 
Superintendents. 

In Agricultural Colleges 
or schools as : 
Teachers. 
Presidents. 

AgriculturalExperiment 
Stations : 
Directors, 
Workers, 

U. S. Govt, and State 
Depts. of Agriculture, 

Economic Entomolo- 
gists, not in U. S. 
Govt, or State Depts.. 

Fortilizer and Insecti- 
cide Manuf. or trade. 

Veterinarians. 

Agricultural Journalists, 

Agricultural Engineers. 

Landscape Architects, 

Tree Experts. 

Graduate Students. 
(Agricultural sub- 
jects). 

Live Stock and Dairy 
Products, dealers. 

Creamery work. 

Private Agricultural 
Chemists, 

Totals. 

Total Living, 



25 

2 



48 
138 



1881- 

1890 



1891- 
1900 



34 
2 



11 

I 



70 
125 



34 
10 



13 



10 



1901- 
1907 



26 
8 



26 



Totals. 



17 



119 
22 



57 
2 



4 
26 



24 



12 



12 






! 


3 


5 


6 


7 


16 


1 


12 


13 




2 


2 


1 


1 


5 


1 


1 


2 


• • 


2 


2 
329 


95 


116 


203 


191 


657 



The percentages were worked out by decades. 
The results are as follows : 

Number engaged in agriculture or pursuits closely 
connected with agriculture. 

For the years 1871 to 1880, 

For the years 1881 to 1890, 

For the years 1891 to 1900. 

For the years 1901 to 1907, 

These figures show that 49.6 per cent, of the total 
number of living alumni are engaged in agriculture or 
closely allied pursuits, including those for whom no 
occupation Is given. When the latter are left out of 
consideration this percentage is increased to 53.6 per 
cent. 



34.8 per cent. 
56.0 per cent. 
46.8 per cent. 
60. 7 per cent. 



Dcp*rtmf rvf flo-tcs. 



HORTICULTURE. 

Profs. Waugh and Seers have purchased three 
adjoining farms on the Bay Road in South 
Amherst, comprising 150 acres and will put it 
into orchard. This spring they will set out 30 acres 
of trees including 500 Dwarf Apple to be imported 
from Europe. 3000 Peach, 500 Plums, and 2000 
Apple. They will go into Market Gardening to some 
extent and also gradually increase the orchards. 
This work is to be carried on in a thoroughly practical 
and scientific manner and should well 'llustrate the 
practical side of Horticulture. 

EXPERIMENT STATION. 
The Botany Department of the Experiment Station 
is doing an increased amount of seed separation over 
that of former years. Large quantities of onion and 
tobacco seed are being sent into the Department from 
farmers throughout the State. By means of Dr. 
Stone's new Invention, an electric blower, a clean 
and rapid separation of the seed takes place. 

The committee of the trustees of the college on 
the Experiment Department recently held a meeting in 
the Amherst House. Reports were made by the heads 
of the different departments, Dr. J. B. Lindsey, 
Profs. F. A. Waugh, George E. Stone, Fernald, 
Paige and Ostrander. President Butterfield and 
Director William P. Brooks were also present. The 
chairman of the committee is Charles H . Preston of 
Danvers. and the other members are W. H. Bowker, 



J. Lewis Ellsworth, S. C. Damon and W. W. Raw- 
son. Appropriations were made for the ensuing year. 

FLORICULTURE. 
The Department of Floriculture is arranging for a 
carnation and rose exhibit to be held in Wilder Hall, 
Friday evening. April 24, and Saturday, April 25. 
Professor White has written many of the most promi- 
nent rose and carnation growers asking if they would 
send one or two dozen blooms of their standard 
varieties for exhibition at this time, and has received 
many cordial replies. The New Hampshire Agricul- 
tural College will show six or eight of their best seed 
lings; Peter Fisher of Ellis, Mass., the originator of 
the noted Lawson and the Enchantress carnation, will 
send several of his unnamed seedlings and some of 
his standard varieties; C. W. Ward, »■ The Cottage 
Gardens," Queens, N. Y., will show the following 
varieties: Creole Beauty, Alma Ward, Mrs. Har- 
vey, Snowflake, Beacon, and Mrs. C. W. Ward. 
Among others who have signified their intention to 
send material for exhibition are Mr. Alexander Mont- 
gomery, Waban Rose Conservatories, Natick ; J. 
W. Adams & Company. Springfield; H. W. Field, 
Northampton ; Peirce Brothers, Waltham ; William 
Sim, Cliftondale. This exhibit will be open to 
students and townspeople and should have considera- 
ble educational value. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
The photographic salon heralded in the last issue 
of the Signal has arrived and is open to the public. 
It consists chiefly of landscapes, the work of some 
of the best art photographers in America. The 
J. Horace McFarland Co., Horticultural Printers, 
Harrisburg. Pa., has contributed several photographs 
of some fine bits of scenery. The senior landscape 
gardening class is making a special study of the 
pictures. 

The College has recently received a small but 
highly valued gift in the form of a printed copy of the 
report on the improvement of the college grounds 
made to the trustees in 1866 by Frederick Law Olm- 
sted. The report is signed by Mr. Olmsted and 
issued from the famous firm of Olmsted, Vaux & 
Co.. landscape architects. It deals very comprehen- 
sively with the plans for development of the infant 
college, and makes highly interesting reading, 



I t 



10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 



t 






especially to the landscape gardening classes of the 
present day. This copy was presented to the college 
by Frederick Law Olmsted, Jr., through the request 
of Professor Waugh who is now working on extensive 
plans for the future development of the college 
grounds. 



Al 



umm. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 16, 1908. For particulars and invitations 
address. HAROLD ALLEN, Amherst. 

Notice 1905.— The class will hold its Trien- 
nial Reunion at Amherst, June 16, 1908. 

P. F. WILLIAMS, Sec. 

'85.— Dr. George H. Barber, U.S. Naval Has 
pital, Chelsea. 

'92. — George E. Taylor, Shelburne, and S. S. 
Warner of Northampton are leading members in the 
Franklin Harvest Club. This club is one of the 
sprightliest, most intellectual and businesslike farmers' 
clubs in this section. Its meetings are coming to be 
notable events in the valley. 

'94. — Joseph A. Putnam, Manager Fernwood 
Farm at Litchfield, Conn., has been elected President 
of the Connecticut Fruit Growers' Association and 
Lecturer of the Connecticut State Grange. 
'94. — Louis M. Barker. Hanson. 
'94. — H. H. Goodenough, State Normal School, 
Department of History and Civics, Springfield, 
South Dak. 

'94. — a. H. Kirkland, Superintendent of the Gypsy 
Moth Commission. 6 Beacon St., Boston, is with a 
corps of men pursuing a campaign against the gypsy 
moths in Springfield and river towns north. 

*94._Prof. S. Francis Howard and Mrs. Howard 
are rejoicing over the arrival of a son, Martin Stod- 
dard, born March 10, 10 Allen St., Amherst. 

'94. — Dr. T. S. Bacon is ill at his home, 6 Chest- 
nut St., Springfield, from the effects of several years 
of very arduous work. 

'95. — M. J. Sullivan, Superintendent of "The 
Rocks" at Littleton, N. H., spent a few days at col- 
lege recently. 



'95.— F. C. Tobey. Manager West Stockbridge 
Lime Co. , was among those present at the Alumni 
Dinner at Northampton held Feb. 22. Mr. Tobey 
has recently visited M. A. C. and reports a prosperous 
year in the lime industry. 

'95. — Patrick A. Leamy, Midas, via Golconda, 
Nev. Mr. Leamy is interested in a gold mine located 
in that townsite. 

'96. — D. C. Potter, Fairhaven, Landscape and 
Sanitary Engineer. 

'96.— Clifford A. Tinker, ex- '04, and Albin M. 
Kramer have opened an office in Springfield under 
the firm name of Tinker & Kramer, Architects and 
Engineers. Address, Room 230, 351 Main St., 
Springfield. 

'97. — J. A. Emrich, Sunday school superin- 
tendent and assistant pastor of the First Christian 
Church of Sacramento, Cal., was married, March 23. 
to Miss Nellie Croucher of Williams. Address, 1704 
Eye Street, Sacramento, Cal. 

'99.— W. E. Chapin, 55 Elm St., Melrose. 

'99.— Bernard H. Smith, Chief of the Food and 
Drug Inspection Laboratory, United States Apprais- 
ers' Stores, Boston, presented a paper upon "The 
National Food and Drugs Act'* at the 83d meeting of 
the Northeastern Section of the American Chemical 
Society held on March 20 at the Tech Union, 
Boston. 

'02.— F. R. Church, Shelburne Falls. 

03. — W. E. Tottingham of the Department of 
Chemistry at the college of agriculture of the Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin was called to his home at Bernard- 
ston. not long ago, to the funeral of his mother. 

'04. — S. B. Haskell has for the present finished 
studying at the University of Leipsic, Germany and is 
now pursuing studies at Zurich, Switzerland. 

'04. — The name of H. M. White appears as joint 
author of a bulletin from the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture entitled "The Decay of Oranges while 
in transit from California." Mr. White has had 
personal charge of many of the trans-continental ship- 
ments and has crossed the country a number of times. 

04— Fred F. Henshaw, U. S. Geological 
Survey, Washington, D. C. Mr. Henshaw has for 



the past two years been engaged as Hydraulic Engineer 
on the Water Supply of Nome Region. Alaska. He 
has also been in charge of Steam-Gauging, Seward 
Peninsula, Alaska. In a recent bulletin of the U. S. 
Geological Survey, mention is made of Mr. Henshaw's 
Investigations and it is stated that he will be engaged 
in that region for another season. 

'05. — The engagement is announced of G. N. 
Willis to Florence Emily Ripley of Springfield. 

'05. Walter B. Hatch has received a substantial 

promotion, having been appointed superintendent of a 
new landscape cemetery at Torrington, Conn. It Is 
a big project involving a lot of construction work and 
a good deal of responsibility. 

05.— Ralph P. Gay. 442 West Front St.. Plain- 
field. N. J., City Forester. 

'05. —P. F. Williams, Assistant in Department of 
Horticulture, Alabama Polytechnic Institute. Auburn, 
Ala. 

06. A. H. M. Wood has resigned his position in 

New York state and, having obtained considerable ex- 
perience along agricultural lines, he has returned to his 



home at Easton where he intends to go into farming 
on quite an extensive scale. 

'06.— C. E. Hood. U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, Bureau of Entomology. Address Box 208, 
Dallas, Tex. 

'06.— C. A. Tirrell, Beaumont. Tex. 
'07.— F. L. Peters has not been taken into the 
firm of H. L. Frost & Co., as stated in a recent 
issue of The Signal. 

E X . '08. — F. L. Austin, Secretary to the Dairy 
and Food Commission, State of Missouri, located at 
Columbia, Mo. 

Ex-'09. — T. Cronyn, Reservoir Camp. Fort Gar- 
land, Colo. Cronyn is doing survey work in the 
construction of a large reservoir dam and system of 
ditches and canals for irrigation five miles from Fort 
Garland, which is in the San Lorn's Valley, in the 
heart of the Rockies in Southern Colorado. 8,200 
feet above sea level. 



It may be of interest for some to know that the 

State Gypsy Moth Commission is at present scouting 
the town for signs of the pest. 




AT THE GOAL 

of fashion, and moving fast-our Spring and Summer assembly of modish 
Woolens. 

The favored weaves and the classiest colorings for the new season— none others 
admitted to our field. 

Our garments portray an advance in tailoring as well as in style. We ve never 
yet let the matured mode elude us and we don't know the sound of a kick. 

New York and London's freshest fads and prices to please. 

Amherst House Block. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EnPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LAN5INQ, MICHIGAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT COURSE MEN 
I place buttermakers, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 



M House Baiter snap 



Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. 

Tuesdays 7 " 6 

Wednesdays, 7 " 8 

Thursdays, 7 6 

Fridays, 7 " 8 

Saturdays, 7 " 11 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, Confectionery and Fruit, 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 



AMHERST 



TAILOH 
II AMITY STREET. 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 



GOODS FOR MEN 




C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES. IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

All_OR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's 3m% 

Old South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Ontlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PEH DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with as. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Fxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN GRAND FERTILIZERS 

(ienuine Peruvian (iuano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertiliser Literature is sent Free of Charge if vou mention 
the Collegt Signn/ 



•• For the 



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ST.. BOSTON 
. NEW YORK 
I. Cambridge, Mass. 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



When thinking of establishing A HOME OF 
YOUR OWN it would simply be wisdom to get 
acquainted with the merits of 

A First-Class Sewing Machine 

l.IKK 

THE NEW DOMESTIC. 

SOLI) BY 
K. A.. THOMPSON, 

Kear First National Bank, AMHEKM 




CapsandGotons 

Makers to 06, 07, 08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS <£ VINING. 

262 Fourth At' . N«w Yobk. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masouic lllock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Lunches, Confectionery, Cigars Noted (or its excellent 

Oyater Stew and Clam Chewdar. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOTN TON, 

MABCFACTOBBB OF 



Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Bear and Ulnger 
▲ la- Fountain* charged to order. 



RITBB STBHT, 



NOBTBAMPTOM, MASB. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and summer 
trade of '07 Id Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladles' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Preying promptly done. 

Kf-MUitary Work a Specialty „4M 
Under the Post Office, - - Amherst, Mam. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up-to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRWK, Proprietor. 

Tmherststeam laundry 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 

Ifcf.A.C. A.*?**, H.M.JKMNIBJOX.'OW 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

J&8ATI8FAOTION OUARANTBBD. • W 
B. A. UTL.KY, Jfe w g w . 

Office: 

Esust Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COlvlvEGE »TORB>. 



The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothea are made on the Mew Home Sbwikg 
Machine, which tact, assures them of no "rlpa." Mother* 
should yet one at onee aa It will do for their children In yaara 
to come. Dealer* Everywhere. 



GonneGtiGut Valley Street Railway Go. 

AMHKRBT DITIMION. 

Cars will leave Auiherstsmt Northampton on the hour aad 
iialf boar from «.3U a. m. till 10.30 p. b. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.90 A. M. 

Maim Office, Ubkenkield, Mass. 

John A. Tagcart, 8upt. 

Southampton office, 102 Maim St. 

C. W . Clapp, Asst. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, 135-12. 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To savt your sole. Come tome for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Offositb Town Hall. 




t& 




tRai 




Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO JAN. 1, IMS. 



SOUTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate, 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
G.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 
St. Albans, Vt. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



DENTAL ROOMS, 



< HTLKR'8 BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, ... AMHKRBT, M ASM. 

OFFICK Hoobs 

S TO IS A.. M-, l-OO TO 6 P. B*. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Ou administered when desired. 



THURBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS 



Bring your pictures to 
us to be framed. 

WE HAVE STARTED A CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 

Have all the latest books of fiction. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT OF* BUBINE8II. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 
spring. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Arthur E. Dork. 



L. H. TOURTELOTTR. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 



Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 

THE GHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., • 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



2>cAiZZare's 
PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, (Maes and Group Work a Specialty. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 



M'J Main Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Tel. 332-2. 




THK LARGEST COLLEGE RNGRAV 
ING HOUSE IN THE WORLD. 



Works: 17th Street&LehighAve. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection. AEHERST. MASS 



J. H.TROTT 



PLUNDER, STEW I MS FITTER. 
in lEiia ii stoves m una. 



SHOf 15 I-* North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE>ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMFI.KTK LINK OK UOOD8 
-1 ITKO TO THK KTC'DKNTS' WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



K8TAHI.IsHKI» ls.M 



EIMER & AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. lHth Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMI'lPKlKKl- AM> MAM I VI II Ht.KK OF 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 

We handle the l»f>t <>!' 
EVERYTHING KBIDBD IN A LABORATORY. 



All £<>o<ls Strictly Cash ami at La-west Prices. 



:. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix Row, 



Amhkkvi, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



J 1 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

C.'leanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

If. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

N OUT HAMPTON, MASS. 

NcRf Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Hath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



J. A. 
PLEASANT ST- 



TURNER. 

OVEI AMHERST BAKERY. 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A PULL I.IM <>>• 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

Hol.YOKB, MASS. 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINK CAFE 0FBH I'NTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Hamjuets 
and Class Dinners. 

610. H. BOWKER & CO. 



<A*MN«R & AowHoua, 



AttHttSf , ftA$$. 









• 



•Ks^THE* 



/Bbassacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Colleac 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairy Fakmino. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the I'nited 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School ok Aohicui.ti re. Intended more particularly foi teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2. A FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics. Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. BuifUMOLD, Amherst, Mass. 



HE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 14 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 6. 190S 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GoQDBGticut Valley Street Railway Go. 

AMHEHBT DIVI8ION. 

Cars will leave Amherst ami Northampton on the hour ami 
half hour from «.3o a. m. till 10.30 r. M. Sundays the first car 
will leave at 8.30 a.m. 

Main Offick, urusnfibi.d, Mars. 
John A.Taggart, Supt. 

SOUTHAMPTON OFFICE, 103 MAIM ST. 

C. W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, 12512. 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To save your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Hall.. 

Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amheret. 



Ellsworth N. Brown, D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS. 

CUTLER'S BLOCK, AMHERST, MASS. 



e. S. GATES, ».».». 

DENTAL ROOMS, 



i'1'TI.KR'S BLOCK. 



AMHERST, MASS 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAM8" BLOCK, . AMHERST, MASS 

okfick Hours i 
9 to is -a.. m., 1-30 to 6 j». m. 

Ether and Nitrous Oxide Gas administered when desired. 



THU RBER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 



CORRECTED TO JAN. 1, 1908. 




SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, and 
6.27 p. m. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HANLEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS 



Bring your pictures to 
us to be framed. 



WE HAVE STARTED A CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 

Have all the latest books of fiction. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 

C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

If Main St., - • - • Northampton. 

Masonic Block, near Depot, Open every day- 

Lunches. Confeetlonery, Cigara Noted for its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAKUFACTUBKK OF 

SODA WATERS. 

Pineapple. Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountains charged to order 

Kivsa Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

TIE OLD CORNER DRU6 STORE. 



POWERS. 
THE TAILOR. 

Has received the latest fabric* for the spring mil Hummer 
trade of '07 in Gcntlemcn'8 Garments. Also does Ladles' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning. Altering, Repairing 

and Firming promptly done. 

Jgp-Military Work a Specialty. ..18 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkrst, Mass. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New andUpto-Dati. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BKST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

I). II. KENDRICK, Projwietor. 



TRY OUR 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment. 



IV1.A..O. A«*t, 



H.M.JBNN1MON, H >*» 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. *82, 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
.. •• Thursday delivered Saturday. 

rerSATISFAOTION <*TJJk.m.*L.**TVBT>. »'/-*■ 

IT. A. VTLKT, Manager. 

OFFICE: 

East 2=leaea».t Street. 



Students* Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT the 



COIvIvBGE »TOKR, 



The Children are Happy. 

Rer»u»e their clothe* are ma<Ie on the KBV Home Skwiim. 
maphisf which fact, assures then, of no "rli-H." Mother 
,h oul'l A't one at once'.. It will .lo for their rtfi-ft* In ye*,. 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 




SANDERSON & THOMPSONS 



BRIAR . PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 




M. B. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTIC/AN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specially. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, IHAMDOblN, GUITAR STRINGS. 




Deuel's Drug Store. 



0CCULI8T8 PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 

GO TO .... 

Page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 

SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 6. 1908 



NO. 14 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collhgs Signal. Amhbrst. Mass. The Signal will be 
sent to all subscribers until its discontinuance is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BRICCS, 1909. Business Manager. 

E. F. DAMON, 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 



R. C. POTTER, 1909. College Notes. 

M. F. CEER. 1909, Alumni Notes. 

C. H. WHITE, 1909. Y. M. C. A. Notes 



R. N. HALLOWELL. 1911. 
S. R. PARSONS, 1911. 



W.R.CLARKE. 1910. Department Notes. 
L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 
H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Special. 



Term*) i $1.00 per year in advance. Single Copiea, 10c. Poatage outafde of United Statea and Canada, Sfc. extra. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket- Ball Association, 
Base Ball Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman. Manager- 
College Senate, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C. A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Clllett. President. 



J. R. Parker. Pres. 
R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 
C. H. White. Pres. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter, Post Office at Amherst. 



Edi-tbrials. 



We are glad to be able to report the final status of 
the appropriation bill as presented to the lieutenant- 
governor for his signature. However it is understood 
as we go to press that it has not yet come under his 
hand. 



Because of an unusual amount of copy and at the 
request of the editor the board voted to make this 
week's issue larger than usual by four pages. 
Despite this fact several articles of interest had to be 
held for the next issue and the editorial column 
curtailed. 



It should be of special interest to the College to 
learn that the new high school building in Petersham 
is to be dedicated May 22, primarily because it will 
house the first agricultural high school in the state, 
and secondarily, because E. H. Scott, '06, is prin- 
cipal and prime mover of the project. The school 
was opened in the fall of 1906 and has proved well- 



adapted to the rural community In which it thrives. 
The dedicatory ceremonies will be attended by a 
number of college presidents, including President 
Charles W. Eliot of Harvard, President K. L. But- 
terfield of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
President Carroll D. Wright of Clark College and 
Secretary Martin of the state board of education. 
The interest that President Eliot takes in Petersham 
is due to the fact that Harvard has lately acquired a 
large tract of woodland in the town which is to be 
used by the forestry department of the college. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

May 7. Y. M. C. A. 6-45 

10. Chapel, 9-15, Speaker, Capt. Geo. C. Martin 
Subject, Robert E. Lee. 

12. Stockbridge Club, Business meeting. 
Baseball, Univ. of Vermont on the campus. 

13. Assembly, 1-30. Natural History Club. 

14. Y. M. C. A. 6-45. 

17. Chapel, 9- 15. Speaker, Dr. Charles Welling- 
ton. Subject, Gen. S. C. Armstrong. 

19. Stockbridge Ciub. Speaker, Dr. H. J. 

Wheeler, Kingston, R. 1. 

20. Assembly, 1-30. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Athletic No-Us- 

BASEBALL. 

Amherst, 2; M. A. C, 0. 
The baseball team lost to Amherst college Satur- 
day, April 18, In a game characterized by light hitting 
and erratic fielding. The infitld was just slippery 
enough to make quick starting impossible, and to this 
fact some of the errors are to be attributed. The 
work of both pitchers was good, Cobb giving no bases 
on balls, but hitting a man, and Brick giving only one 
base. Amherst players were fortunate in placing their 
hits, a remarkable number of their drives dropping just 
out of reach of the infielders, back of second base. 
Brick's spit ball was too much for all but O 'Grady 
and O'Donnell, each of whom got one hit. The first 
man at bat put up a fly that O'Donnell could not quite 
reach, owing to a bad slip at starting. Washburn hit 
a slow one between first and the pitcher's box, and 
three men went after it, so that the base was un- 
covered, and the man safe. After Palmer had 
grounded out to Cobb, McClure scratched a hit, 
letting Jube score. Guptil struck out, and Danahey 
flied out to left. 

Tilton put a high one to Brick. Pennock let Hub- 
bard reach first, but no good resulted, as Fred 
Warner struck out, and O' Grady gave Palmer a 
chance for a put out, which was accepted. For 
Amherst, Kane gave Cobb an eas> grounder, Pennock 
struck out, Brick hit over second and Jube grounded 
to O'Donnell. 

In the third Chet Warner sent a grounder to 
Palmer, Brick covering the base. French gave 
Brick an assist, O'Donnell scratched to third, and 
Shattuck fouled to Danahey. Washburn dropped a 
Texas Leaguer over second, but the next three were 
easy. 

Nothing doing in the fourth on either side, but in 
the fifth the only double play of the game, Pennock 
to Palmer, prevented Fred Warner from reaching 
second, after Pennock's error had given him first 
base. Brick duplicated his first hit, Jube grounded 
to Cobb after Brick had stolen second, Washburn hit 
to center, but O'Grady's fine throw to the plate held 
the runners at second and third. Palmer was weighed 
in the balance, and found wanting, fanning at three of 



Cobb's slants. McClure skied to short. French and 
O'Donnell could not get the ball past the pitcher, ana 
Shattuck lifted one to Guptil. Guptil rolled a fas: 
one through Hubbard to right, but was forced a: 
second, Shattuck to O'Donnell, by Danahey, wh: 
was in turn forced, Tilton to O'Donnell, by Kane. 
Pennock hit one too fast to be handled to O'Donnel, 
but Brick forced him, O'Donnell to Shattuck. 

In the seventh, Cobb lined to short, Tilton flied out 
to first base. Jube lined to Shattuck, Washbur:: 
was hit by a pitched ball, but was caught napping a* 
the first bag. Palmer gave Hubbard a grounder, on 
which Cobb covered the bag. With one down in the 
eighth, O 'Grady singled to center, but was forced a; 
second, Brick to Pennock. Chet Warner reache: 
second on Kane's fumble of Pennock's throw, Frencr. 
reaching first. O'Donnell was retired by Jube. 
Amherst added a run in their half. McClure reached 
first on O'Donnell's error, was sacrificed to second 
by Guptil, advanced on Danahey' s out, and scored o:. 
a passed ball. 

In the last, Shattuck was given his base, but was 
forced at second. Tilton popped to Danahey, and 
Hubbard drove a fast grounder to first. 

The score : — 



O'Donnell. s. 
Shattuck. 2 b. 
Cobb, p. 
Tilton. 3 b. 
Hubbard, 1 b. 
F. Warner, I. f. 
O'Grady. c. f. 
T. L. Warner, r. f. 
French, c. 

Totals. 



Jube, c. f. 
Washburn, 3 b. 
Palmer, 1 b. 
McClure. I. f. 
Guptil, r. i. 
Danahey, c. 
Kane. 2 b. 
Pennock, s. 
Briok, p. 



MASSACHUSETTS. 
A.B. 

4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 

31 

AMHERST 

A.B. 

4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
4 
4 
4 
3 



1 






o 



I 






B. 

1 

2 

1 





1 

2 



P.O. 

J 
3 
1 
1 
1 1 
1 
2 

4 

24 



P.O. 

1 


12 
1 
I 
4 
2 
4 
2 



A. 

3 
3 
5 
2 
1 




I 

IS 



A. 




I 





I 
3 

7 



Totals. 32 7 27 12 j 

Runs-lube, McCiure. Sacrifice hits-Palmer. Guptil. Stolen base«- 
Jub'. Wa shburn. McClure. Brick. Base on balls-Shattuck. Struck out- 
Palmer. Guptil. Pennock. F. Warner, Tilton. Hit by pitched ball 
burn. Double play— Pennock to Palmer. Time— 1 hour. 40 m*W» 
Umpire— Bowler. 

Monday, April 20, the baseball team played a 
semiprofessional team at Orange. The game was 
characterized by perfect fielding and timely hitting on 
our part, in spite of a wet field and rainy weather. 



Hubbard pitched a good game. 
10-0, in our favor. 



The final score was 



M. 



S. T. S., 2. 



A. C, 1 

The Springfield Union gives this account of the 
Training School game: — 

"Amherst, April 25— The Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college baseball team easily defeated the Spring- 
field Training school nine on the school diamond this 
afternoon by the score of 10 to 2. The Training 
school team was outclassed throughout and never had 
a chance to win. Blaney pitched for the Aggie nine 
and had the visitors guessing most of the time. 
Whenever they did manage to connect with his 
delivery they always seemed to hit it directly at some 
of the M. A. C. players and were easy outs. 

Bailey, who was on the slab for the Training school 
pitched good ball outside of the fifth inning, when he 
took a balloon ascension, which, combined with errors 
behind him, netted the Aggie team six runs. In the 
matter of clean hitting the visitors secured five nice 
ones off of Blaney, while the home lads managed to 
get six off of Bailey. The features were catches by 
Honhart and T. L. Warner in the outfield. 
The score: — 



M. A. C, 12; Norwich University, 4. 
This game was too one-sided to be very Interesting, 
owing largely to the numerous errors contributed by 
the visitors. The hitting on both sides was heavy, 
Aggie leading with 10, total 19, Norwich 9, total II. 
The numerous triples relieved the monotony, M. A. 
C. getting four and one double, while the opponents 
had one three-sacker. Three visiting pitchers were 
sent to the woods, and more would have followed had 
the game not Deen cut short by common consent. 
The work of Blaney was erratic, but it was only In the 
seventh that he was hit hard, a mixture of three sin- 
gles, a triple, and a sacrifice netting half the visitors' 
runs. He gave four passes, while the University slab 
artists gave three bases on balls and hit three batters. 
Blaney struck out nine. 



MASSACHUSETTS 



J. F. O'Donnell, i. •■ 
F. Wamer. I. f . 
Cobb. 2 b. 
Tilton 3 b. 
Hubbard I b. 
O'Grady, c. f . 
T. L. Warner, r. f. 
French, c. 
Blaney. p. 
Totals. 



A.B. 

4 
3 
4 
5 

4 
4 
2 
2 

4 



R. 

a 

3 

i 
i 
i 
i 
i 

2 





B. 

2 
1 

I 

2 
I 

I 


1 



S.B. 


3 
1 


1 
1 

2 
2 




3 

3 
2 
1 

5 


10 




A. 
1 


2 
1 




I 
1 









I 







32 12 10 10 

NORWICH UNIVERSITY. 



O'Donne'l. s. s 
F. Warner, 1. f. 
Cobb. 2 b. 
Tilton, 3 b. 
Hubbard. 1. I. 
O'Grady. c. (. 
T. L. Wamer. r. f . 
French, c. 
Blaney, p. 

Totals. 



McCulioch, s. s. 
Honhart. If. 
Flemming, ». b. 
J.L. Johnson, 2 b. 
Messer, c. f . 
Bailey, p. 
Moller, 3 b. 
A. G. Johnson, c. 
Winters, r. f. 

Totals, 
Innings, 

Massachusetts. 

Training School 



MASSACHUSBTTS. 

A.B. B- 

3 

3 1 

4 

3 I 

4 2 
I 
4 I 
3 1 

3 

28 6 

TRAINING SCHOOL. 

A.B. B. 

4 
4 

4 I 

4 3 

3 

3 

3 

3 
3 I 



1 






2 





3 

2 




31 
4 






P.O. 

2 
1 

3 

1 

17 

1 


2 


27 



P.O. 

2 
I 

7 
3 
3 


8 


24 



A. 

3 


3 
2 




8 

16 



A. 
1 



3 
I 

7 

2 


14 



R. 
3 

1 
1 

1 
1 






A.B. 

3 

4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
4 
3 
I 
1 
I 



R. 
I 



I 






1 







B. 

2 

I 

2 
I 


I 


2 






S.B. 

1 





1 
1 









24 

P.O. 

I 

7 
I 

3 
I 
1 

2 
S 






J 


I 

1 



4 
2 


2 

I 



B. 
I 

2 

3 

I 
1 








5 
I 




I 

o 





e 
o 




9 

2-10 
2- 2 



Run.-O'Donnell F Warner. Cobb 2, Tilton. Hubbard I O'Grady. T. L. 
u# iP.^v 9 Mrrultach Fleming. Sacrifice hits-Messer, O Grady. 



Blanchard, 2 b. 
White. 1 b. 
Clark, r. f. 
Reed. 3 b. p. 
J. E. O'Donnell. c. f. 
Bamey. I. f. 
Brown, s. s. 
Richmond, c. 
Coleburn. p. 
Cole. p. 
Shak, p. 3 b. 

Totals 31 4 9 3 21 12 8 

Sacrifice hits- F. Warner. Cobb. Shak. Two base hlts-Hubbard. 
Three base hits-Hubbard. Cobb. Tilton. T. L. Warner Blanchard Base 
In bt ls-<5f Blaney 4 off Coieburn 2. off Reed 1 . Hit by pitched ball J 
F tVDonnellF Warner. T. L. Warner. Struck out -by Blaney 9. by 
Cole 2^y Coleburn T Passed ball-by Richmond. Time- 1 hour. 45 
minutes. Umplre-Foley. 

THE ROPE PULL. 

The rope pull between the two lower classes was 
held late Tuesday afternoon, April 21. One hundred 
feet of 1 1-4 inch rope was used. Prof. C. E. Gordon 
acted as starter and referee. After two minutes of 
strenuous pulling the Freshmen were declared victors 
by one foot, four inches. By winning this contest the 
Freshmen have won the privilege of smoking on the 
campus. The Sophomore team was composed of 
Leonard (Capt.), Eddy, Schermerhorn, Brandt. 
Cowles, and Hazen; the Freshman team of Damon 
(Capt.), Tilton, Becker, Howard and Daniels. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Colkg* |Yot*j. 



Hazen, 1910. entertained his brother at college for 
a few days. 

Operations for the improvement of North College 
have been started. The basement is being cleaned 
out. 

F. A. Johnson, '08, is again attending classes. 
Owing to severe illness he has been confined to his 
room. 

Plans for the new greenhouse and attached teach- 
ing building are being reviewed by the heads of the 
department. 

C. H. White, '09, gave a talk Sunday evening, 
April 26, before a gathering at one of the South 
Amherst churches. 

J. A. Hyslop, '08, assisted by some of the junior 
zoologists, is carrying on very interesting experiments 
in the development of toad's eggs. 

The work around Clark Hall has progressed rap- 
idly of late. A fine bit of lawn will soon be seen on 
the hill about the two new buildings. 

The new informal committee are: Chairman, R. 
H. Verbeck, '08, R. H. Allen, W. E. Leonard,' H. 
A. Brooks, '10. L. W. Chapman, '08. 

L. A. Shattuck, '08, has left college for a few 
weeks. The vacancy caused by his absence on the 
baseball team has resulted in a new line-up. 

The senior class bed has made a fine start. The 
design as well as the arrangement of flowers is quite 
original. More changes will be made before the 
final design. 

Dr. Loomis of Amherst College gave a very inter- 
esting lecture before the Natural History Club on 
April 29, his subject being Adaptive Radiation Among 
Rhinoceroses. 

On Friday, April 24, Mr. G. H. Sinclair of North- 
ampton, addressed the Horticultural seminar, his 
subject being: "The Carnation, its Culture and 
Development." 

It may be of interest to the many friends of E. V. 
Bennett. ex-'09, to know that he is improving in 
health and expects to be with us next year. At pres- 
ent he is in the South. Here's wishing him a speedy 
recovery. 



M. F. Geer, '09, has been elected to the Signal 
Board to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of 
W. E. Adams, '09. He will have charge of the 
alumni department. 

On account of the death of his father, W. E. 
Adams, '09, has found it necessary to leave college 
in order to assume the management of his father's 
lumber business and other interests. 

There was a meeting of the trustees of the Hamp- 
shire Agricultural Society, Saturday evening, April 
18, in the Amherst House. President Butterfield 
was present and discussed plans with the trustees of 
cooperation between the society and the college. 

Now that spring has come again Amherst and 
vicinity will be covered with M. A. C. men off on 
nature study, Freshman Botany and Junior Geology, 
Botany and Entomology. Most people do not realize 
how really close to nature we are in this institution. 

At a recent meeting of the Freshman class the 
following officers were chosen: President. J. F. 
Adams; vice-president, 1. W. Davis; secretary and 
treasurer. W. R. Phipps; class captain, L E. Dan- 
iels; S. at A., Loker; rope pull captain, C. M. 
Damon. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CONCERT. 

The Musical Association performed creditably to a 
small but appreciative audience last Friday night in 
the Chapel. The program was finely rendered and 
shows the expenditure of much time and thought. 

PART ONE 

Schlepegrell 



Marschuer 
Griegs 

Moore 
Petne 



1. Overture, -The Golden Scepter. " 

Orchestra. 

2. Song, "Good-night My Love." 

Glee Club. 

3. Violin solo. "Solvejg's" Song. 
From Peer Gynte Suite No II 

Mr. P. A. Racicot. 

4. March. "Delta Sigma March." 
Mandolin Club. 

5. Vocal solo, "The Sea Is Calling Me." 
Mr. Louis Brandt. 

PART TWO 

t. Shadow Dance. "Flickering Firelight." p en n 

Orchestra. 

2. Mandolin solo. "Prison Song." from "IlTrovatore " 
Mr. C. H. White. 

3. Medley, "A New Medley," Atkinson 
Glee Club. 

4. March. "Fraternity March," Baxter 
Mandolin Club. 

5. Song. "Sons of Old Massachusetts." Chadwick 

Combined Clubs. 



INFORMAL. 

On April 25th one of the best informals of the 
year was held in the Drill Hall. The hall was deco- 
rated in good shape due to the energies of Chairman 
Verbeck and the people who attended enjoyed a 
very pleasant evening. Supper was served in Draper 
Hall by Mrs. Rowe. It was indeed fortunate that a 
baseball game should have come on the same day 
for the girls were thus enabled to see our team defeat 
Springfield in a fast and interesting game. Excellent 
music was furnished by Derrick's Orchestra of West- 
field There is one thing in connection with the 
informals that deserves at least our attention. Dur- 
ing the dance the college song is played by the orches- 
tra. It has been said that a lack of spirit is shown In 
that the students do not sing the song while it is being 
played. Perhaps this is a fair criticism and we should 
see that the song should be sung. Whatever action 
is taken in regard to this matter must be settled 
among those who attend the informals. 

The following were present at the dance : 

Patronesses— Mrs. Butterfield, Mrs. Wellington, 
Mrs. P. H. Smith, Miss Reeves of Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege and Miss Jcslin of Smith College. 

Mr. Fowler, Mr. Holmes, Mr. Gaskill, Mr. P. H. 
Smith, Mr. John Lyman. Mr. Henrf Haskins. 

Among the students : 

J. A. Anderson, L. W. Chapman, H. C. Chase, 
G. R. Cobb, W. J. Coleman, L. E. Cutting, P. 
M. Eastman, A. J. Farley, P. W. Farrar, C. L. 
Flint, H. M. Jennison, J. R. Parker. E. D. Philbrick, 
F. E. Thurston, R. H. Verbeck, J. E. Donnelly of 
Worcester, T. F. Waugh, A. L. Whitney, S. J. 
Wright. W. D. Barlow, P. P. Cardin, G. M. Cod- 
ding, G. R. Fulton, R. D. Lull, H. G. Noble, J. 
Noyes, H. D. Phelps, R. C. Potter, M. W. Thomp- 
son, C. R. Webb. R. P. Armstrong, J. P. Blaney. 
H. A. Brooks, L. C. Brown, W. A. Clowes, E. F. 
Damon. A. W. Holland, W. E. Leonard, L. S. 
McLaine. F. P. Nickless. F. A. Prouty, A. F. 
Rockwood, W. M. S. Titus, P. W. Allen, H. W. 
Blaney, W. F. Hennessey, C. A. Lodge, Jr., F. A. 
McLaughlin, J. P. Nickerson, G. A. Tilton. 

Perhaps one of the best features was the two 
special cars that went to Holyoke and Northampton. 
The elimination of the hurrying was indeed gratifying. 



FRESHMAN BANQUET. 

One of the cleverest bits of strategy that has ever 
been accomplished about here was done by the fresh- 
men during the week of April 19th. After the Am- 
herst game the wily sophomores captured the fresh- 
man class president and officers, in order to break up 
the banquet which they thought was coming during 
the week. This done, they deemed it also wise to 
challenge the freshmen to a rope pull contest on the 
following Monday. The junior class, however, by 
virtue of their position as upper classmen, carried the 
matter to the Senate. The Senate ruled the chal- 
lenge to be illegal provided the banquet was not held 
before the Thursday of that week. This ruling was 
necessary, that the juniors might have a class day. 
But the sophomores did not feel the justice of the 
decree, so they challenged the next day again. We 
need not draw conclusions here, but the strategic 
movement was evident to all. Of course the chal- 
lenge was accepted, and the freshmen had put their 
heads into a noose. But just here was where the 
sophomores were completely outclassed by the su- 
periority of the freshman wit. A large demonstra- 
tion by the freshmen frightened away the sophomores 
and caused the removal of the captives to a more se- 
cure place of concealment. Someone, however, 
blundered, and so enabled the freshman scouts to 
very easily follow the sophomores. Deeming four 
men a sufficient number to guard the freshman officers, 
the sophomores set out to carry the first part of their 
plan through successfully. Untorfunately they did 
not succeed and were badly beaten, the freshmen 
walking away finally with the rope. Immediately 
after the usual celebration the freshmen left town in 
a body to capture their president. Skillfully led on 
by their scouts they located the spot where the cap- 
tives were held and besieged it. Once more the 
Sophomores took to flight and were followed and 
compelled to surrender their prisoners under threats 
of complete annihilation. What was seemingly a 
glorious victory for the sophomores was doubly 
turned into an ignominious defeat. The freshmen 
marched away to Holyoke where with cheers for 1911 
ar.d 1909 they departed for Hartford. Herein spite 
of the great number of difficulties that presented them- 
selves they secured a Hotel and had menus printed 
for a banquet that evening. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



At eight o'clock, April 22nd. the class sat down to 
their banquet. 

The Menu. 

Blue Point Oysters, 
Olives — Clear Mock Turtle Soup, 
Planked Shad, Shore Style, 
Celery — Potatoes Bulchesse — Cucumbers, 
Boiled Spring Chicken, 
Green Peas — Potatoes Delmonico. 
1911 College Punch. 
Fresh Asparagus Salad, 
Strawberry Short Cake, Whipped Cream, 

Coffee. 
Cigars, Cigarettes. 

Held at the New Dome Hotel. 
After the banquet Toastmaster A. L. Sharpe in- 
troduced the class President, J. F. Adams, who spoke 
about his experience. Other speakers were: 
Roscoe, — " Wine, Women and Song." 
Lew,—" Athletics." 
Damon,—" Rope Pull." 

Daniels and Robb also spoke during the evening. 
In the afternoon the class all attended Poll's Theatre. 



GENERAL PROGRAM FOR COMMENCEMENT. 

Friday, 8-00 p. m. Flint Prize Speaking. 
Saturday, 3-00 p. m. Baseball— Boston College vs 

M. A. C. 
8-00 p. m. Burnham Prize Speaking. 
Sunday, 4-00 p. m. Baccalaureate address, Presi- 
dent Butterfield. 

Monday, 1 1-00 a. m. Phi Kappa Phi. 

2-00 p. m. Senior class meeting, Dean's 

charge to the class. 
5-00 p. m. Battalion parade and drill. 
7-15 p. m. Open air concert by musical 

organizations. 
9-00 Fraternity banquets. 

Tuesday. Alumni Day. 

11-00 a. m. Annual meeting of the Associ- 
ate Alumni. 
12-30 p. m, Alumni Dinner. 
4-00 p. m. Senior Class Day. 
6-00 p. m. Class reunions. 
8-00 p. m. Reception by Trustees and 

President. 
10-00 p. m. Sophomore-Senior promenade. 

Wednesday, 10-00 a. m. Commencement exercises, 

Address by Dr. W. H. Jor- 
dan, Geneva, N. Y. 



THE FLOWER SHOW. 

The exhibition of flowers and plants at Wilder 
Hall, Friday, April 24 and Saturday, April 25, was 
the finest held in this vicinity for several years. The 
display of carnations was exceptionally good and the 
College feels deeply indebted to the many growers 
who co-operated in making this show so successful. 
The interest shown by students and towns-people was 
very gratifying the hall being well filled during the 
hours that the exhibit was open. Two rooms were 
devoted to carnations, nasturtiums, swe it peas, etc. 
The reading-room contained the roses while the class- 
room for floriculture was given over to a well arranged 
display of ornamental foliage plants from the Durfee 
plant houses. 

The following are the exhibitors and varieties 
shown : 

F. R. Pierson Co., Tarrytown, N. Y.,— White 
Enchantress, Victory, Melody. Winsor, White Per- 
fection, Beacon. 

William Nicholson, Framingham, Mass.,— Fifty 
blooms of Afterglow. 

W. A. Mandar, South Orange, N. J.,— Pearl 
Pink, a new hardy seedling. Also specimens of his 
Cherokee roses and Green rose. 

Peter Fisher, Ellis, Mass.,— Alma Ward, Winsor, 
Snowflake, Rose Enchantress, Beacon, Mrs. Tom 
Harvey, Evangeline, White Perfection, Mrs. C. W. 
Ward, Enchantress. Also four seedlings under 
number. 

S. J. Goddard, Framingham, Mass., — Helen God- 
dard, Winsor, Victory, Britannia, White Perfection, 
Octoroon, Lady Bountiful, Enchantress. 

Patten & Co. , Tewksbury, Mass. , — Helen Goddard. 
Harry Fenn, Octoroon, Victory, Manley, Winsor, 
Variegated Lawson, Beacon, Red Lawson, Pink 
Patten, White Lawson, White Perfection, Enchan- 
tress. Also eight seedlings under number. 

Cottage Gardens, Queens, N. Y.,— Mrs. C. W. 
Ward, President, Beacon, Snowflake, Alma Ward. 
Mrs. Harvey. 

H. H. Rogers, So. Sudbury, Mass.,— Mrs. T. W. 
Lawson, Fair Maid, Winsor, The Queen. Also three 
seedlings under number. 

H. W. Field, Northampton, Mass.,— Viola Sin- 
clair, Prosperity, Enchantress, President Seelye. 
Brides, Bridesmaids, Richmond and Gen. McArthur, 



roses. Also pansies, nasturtiums and sweet peas. 

J. W. Andrews &. Co., of Springfield, Mass., sent 
fifty Prospector. 

Pierce Bros.. Waltham, Mass.,— Mrs. T. W. 
Lawson, Gen. Guild, (a seedling), Enchantress, 
Rose-pink Enchantress and White Perfection. 

Mr. William Sim of Cliftondale, Mass., showed 
splendid specimens of the following sweet peas: Mrs. 
William Sim. The Lemarquis. Mrs. F. J. Dolansky, 
Mrs.Alex. Wallace, Jack Hunter, Christmas Captain, 
Christmas Pink, Mrs. W. W. Smalley and Florence 

Denser. 

The feature of the exhibit was a vase of thirty 
magnificent, long-stemmed American Beauty roses 
from Waban Rose Conservatories, Natick, Mass. 

At the close of the show Professor White sent the 
flowers, so generously contributed, to the various 
hospitals in the vicinity of Amherst. 



COLLEGE NIGHT OBSERVANCE. 

Massachusetts spirit ran high on the evening of 
April 17, at the College. The occasion was "college 
night, " and was the gathering together of students, 
faculty, representatives of the alumni, the trustees, 
the Legislature and the public, all meeting together 
to discuss the general theme, the enlargement of col- 
lege life. The presence and personality of such men 
as M. F. Dickinson, Dean Mills, Representative F. 
A. Hosmer, Judge Field and Representative Luce 
was enough to insure a helpful and lively discussion 
and enthusiasm ran high all the evening. The 
responses of Representatives Hosmer and Luce were 
especially helpful and enjoyable, especially Mr. Luce, 
who in a bit of oratory set forth the ideal college life, 
what the students should strive for and what the state 
expected of them. 

The affair began at 6 o'clock, when the entire stu- 
dent body, nearly all the faculty and a goodly number 
of alumni and guests, sat down to an excellent supper 
in Draper hall. After doing justice to the menu the 
chairs were pushed back and the meeting was called 
to order by President Butterfield. who expressed 
gratitude that representatives of all the various inter- 
ests of the college were present, and explained that 
the general thread of the evening's discussion would 
be the enlargement of college life. After a word in 

appreciation of the trustees, M. F. Dickinson of Bos- 



ton was called upon as their representative. Mr. 
Dickinson told of the joys of his own college days and 
said that educated men make all their best friends in 
college. He paid a glowing tribute to his best of 
college friends, the late President Goodell, and gave 
to him the credit of raising the college to the high 
position it now holds. In closing Mr. Dickinson said 
that he expected great things of the college in the 
future and that, backed by the great commonwealth 
of Massachusetts it might soon outstrip Its rival at 
the other end of the town. 

Dean George F. Mills, who responded for the fac- 
ulty, expressed the thought that it Is not material 
things alone that make up college life. He said: 
"We cannot enlarge college life simply by adding 
buildings and equipment or by increasing the teaching 
force. We must broaden and cultivate the powers 
of the mind and of the emotions ; we must have a 
sense of the beautiful." Professor Mills expressed 
the hope that the college might In the future not only 
educate a man for a life work, whereby he might 
gain a livelihood, but also give him culture and 
breadth of view. For the alumni, Judge Henry J. 
Field of Greenfield responded. He said in part : 
"The only way to enlarge college life Is to develop 
the student body ; just as much as you enlarge and 
broaden your college, just so much do you enlarge 
your usefulness in public life after college. It Is not 
how much one retains of book knowledge, the Impor- 
tant thing is to leave college trained in the ways of 
law, order and respect, ready to solve whatever prob- 
lem's may come up, prepared to meet the obstacles 
of life, not to dodge them. Care less for American 
wealth than for the duties of American citizenship." 

K. E. Gillett, representative of the college senate, 
responded for the students, dwelling mainly on the 
athletic phase of college life. In introducing Repre- 
sentative Hosmer of Amherst as representing the 
public. President Butterfield told how he had ren- 
dered the college aid in securing appropriations. Mr. 
Hosmer said in part: "The American college stu- 
dent out in life is after the same type In business, In 
politics, wherever you may find him. He stands for 
high ideals. The first duty of a college is not to 
prepare a man to earn his living, but to prepare him 
to help his fellow- men. To do this he must be 
taught one little thing alone— common courtesy. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




Sometimes we are careless in our deportment toward 
each other, toward the faculty or toward the public. 
The community and the commonwealth have a right 
to expect manhood, courtesy and good citizenship. 
It would be well for us to adopt the motto of Sir 
Philip Sidney, 'High thoughts seated in a heart of 
courtesy. * I have just one thought I want to leave 
with you tonight, and that is be a gentleman." 

The last and best speaker of the evening was 
Robert Luce of Boston, chairman of the ways and 
means committee of the House of Representatives. 
In introducing Mr. Luce President Butterfield said 
that there were three reasons why it was a pleasure ; 
first, because he holds the purse string of the state ; 
second, he is our friend, and third, there are whispers 
at the state -house that Mr. Luce may be called to 
higher office and we all like to feel that we know the 
strong men of our time. Mr. Luce was greeted with 
long and hearty applause on the part of the students: 
He said In part : "I am happy that I may be here 
tonight. Hitherto I have thought of the M. A. C. 
merely in the abstract, but now that I have been here 
and have seen your college, have seen this body of 
young men, have heard your inspiring songs, I can go 
back with a clearer idea of what the institution means. 
It truly makes me proud of the 'Old Bay State.' As 
chairman of the ways and means committee I have 
faced a long procession of trustees and representatives 
of institutions that breathe only of despair, hospitals, 
insane asylums, prisons, and it was a great relief to 
come in contact with and be able to help the represen- 
tatives of this institution, that breathe only of hope. I 
do not come here as the almoner of the commonwealth, 
nevertheless I feel that I come as the representative 
of the state, of which you are a part, to tell you why 
the state supports this college. The ultimate purpose 
of government is not happiness alone. Society is a 
partnership not only of the living, but between the 
dead and those yet to be born. 

"In the encouragement of education, that embod- 
ies this year, government executes its proper function. 
In your laboratory you learn of the laws of life, you 
learn that these laws are change, growth, progress, 
these are the lessons of your college. If you are to 
be true to your state, if you are to repay as trustees 
what has been committed to you, you must give to 
your fellowmen even more than has been given to 



you. I will hazard one or two suggestions as to the 
enlargement of college life. I hope that you are pre- 
paring yourself for good citizenship by making your- 
self proficient in the art of public speaking. Qualify 
yourself to take a part in city or town government by 
acquiring the art of thinking aloud. Form and mold 
your studies so that you may secure the prime object 
of education, — to be better citizens. We desire to 
protect the state against mob spirit and the spirit of 
the anarchist. We look to this college to bring the 
landed gentry of New England to a position equal 
with that of England. We look to you to redeem 
rural New England to maintain the equal balance 
between the cities and the country. We want to give 
you the cunning hand and the cultured brain, confi- 
dent that you will return it in loyal patriotism and 
loyalty to the ' Old Bay State*." 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE. 

The summer school this year will open July 6 and 
close August 14. During the first four weeks, July 
6 to July 3 1 ,the work will be primarily for school teach- 
ers; during the last two weeks, August 3-14, the 
work will be primarily for preachers ; but throughtout 
the six weeks there will be maintained certain ele- 
mentary courses in technical agriculture (field crops, 
forestry, etc.,) which will be especially attractive to 
persons who want to get some insight into modern 
methods of scientific and specialized agriculture. 
This arrangement will make it convenient for pupils 
to come for six weeks (the entire course), for four 
weeks (July 6-31) or for two weeks (August 
3-14). This announcement appears more completely 
in the illustrated prospectus sent out some time ago, 
copies of which may be had by writing Professor F. 
A. Waugh. 

The work outlined for the summer will be of five 
different kinds, as follows: Nineteen regular courses 
of study from which each pupil will be required to 
elect courses providing not less than eight nor more 
than twelve exercises weekly, unless a larger or 
smaller amount of work be allowed by special permis- 
sion of the Dean ; field exercises on subjects of gen- 
eral interest one afternoon each week; excursions to 
points of interest within reach of Amherst, on each 
Wednesday afternoon and Saturday ; round tables for 
conference and discussion arranged by the various 



instructors; and evening lectures on popular topics 
will be provided once or twice a week. 

The courses of study are designed with the purpose 
of reaching a varied class of pupils. High school 
teachers, grade teachers, school garden teachers, 
preachers and persons interested in agriculture, with- 
out special reference to teaching, — all will find courses 
adapted to their special needs. 

The courses of study and the instructors are as fol- 
lows: 

1. Agricultural Pedagogy— Professor Hart. 

2. High School Agriculture — Instructor not secured. 

3. High School Chemistry—Myron C. Cobb, science 

teacher in the Lansing (Mich.) High School. 

4. Soils and Tillage — Professor Foord. 

5. Field Crops— Professor W. D. Hurd, Dean of 

the College of Agriculture, University of Maine. 

6. Domestic Animals — Mr. Gribben, 

7. Practical Gardening — Mr. Tompson. 

8. Gardening Investigations— Dean Waugh. 

9. Trees and Shrubs — Professor White. 

10. Floriculture — Professor White, 

11. Plant Life— Mr. Osmun. 

12. Elementary Plant Physiology — Dr. Stone. 

13. Bird Life— William H. Dudley of Wisconsin 

State Normal School. 

14. Insect Life— Professor Fernald. 

15. Nature Study Drawing— Mr. Gracey. 

16. Forestry — Professor White. 

17. The Agricultural Industry in New England — 

Professor Hurd. 

18. Agricultural Economics— Professor T. H. Carver 

of Harvard. 

19. The Social Aspect of Agriculture — President 

Butterfield. 

Ralph J. Watts '07, has been engaged as labora- 
tory and field assistant and Mrs. Martha J. Hawley, 
matron. 

The school promises to be as well attended this 
summer as last although living expenses are reckoned 
at a higher figure. 



'92, — Messrs. Holland and McLauran are working 
in cooperation with the entomological department in 
preparing chemically pure arsenical salts for the pur- 
pose of studying their effect upon the foliage of 
various shrubs and plants. 



THE NEW RIFLE RANGE. 

Captain Martin has purchased for the State a strip 
of land to be turned into a rifle range. This land, 
known as Hawley swamp, lies about one mile and a 
quarter due east of the College. There are about 
twenty acres of both cleared and wooded land and this 
will afford ranges varying in extent from six to eight 
hundred yards. Two targets are to be erected, work 
upon the same beginning next week probabiy, as soon 
as the necessary money and a clear title to the land 
are gained. This land will serve not only as an ex- 
cellent shooting range, but it possesses all the charac- 
teristics of a first-class camp-ground. It is the 
intention of the Captain another year to divide the 
students off into squads, allowing each squad to spend 
an entire day at the range two or three times a year. 
This will give immense opportunity for practice in 
camDlng out and scout drill in addition to the shooting. 
The students of the College are sure to take great in- 
terest in this work, of such a new nature, and in a 
few years a creditable rifle team will be annually rep- 
resenting the College at Creedmore, New Jersey, 
in competition with other college teams. 

M. A. C. APPROPRIATIONS, 1908. 

The appropriations asked from the Legislature this 
year are divided into three general parts. 

1. The first was an appropriation to cover the de- 
ficiency which has been gradually accumulating for 
some years. The Legislature has provided for this 
purpose $23,600, which meets all deficiences and 
enables the college to start its new accounting system 
with a clean balance sheet. 

2. The college asked for an increase of $23,000 
a year for increase in current annual appropriation to 
cover Increased cost ot maintenance, to add new in- 
structors and to develop the short courses. The Leg- 
islature provided $13,000 for the year of 1908, which 
is really not a serious cut because it was made by an 
increase in the deficiency appropriation originally 
asked for. After this year the increase in current 
funds will be $20,000. or a cut of $3,000 from the 
request made. This is a very substantial increase 
and will enable the college to add several very im- 
portant positions to its faculty list and also to develop 
the rapidly growing interest In the short course work. 

3. The total requests asked for special purposes 



IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 







aggregated $71,700. in amount. The various items 
makirg this aggregate were cut somewhat by the Com- 
mittee on Agriculture, partially restored by the Com- 
mittee on Ways and Means, and the final result was 
as follows : 

Target range and equipment, $ 1 ,000.00 

Reparing and refiting Experiment Station 

building, 4,000.00 

Repairing and refitting North College, 6,000.00 

Enlarging and improving the library fac- 
ilities, 1,000.00 
Equipment for departments, 5,000.00 
Miscellaneous repairs and minor improve- 
ments, 5,000.00 
Glass house and attached teaching build- 
ing and equipment for same, 34,000.00 
This makes a total of $56,000.00 for these spec- 
ial appropriations, and an aggregate of approximately 
$93,000.00 for all purposes. 

THE STUDY OF CHEMISTRY. 

By Dr. J. B. Lindsey, '83. 

In each class of students at M. A. C. there are 
those who, upon completing their studies, intend fol- 
lowing the vocation of chemistry either by connect- 
ing themselves with experiment stations, agricultural 
colleges, or some agricultural industry. 

It is my wish to impress upon those who desire to 
take up experiment station work, either as analysts or 
as research chemists, that there is no short cut to 
such position. In order to become a well rounded 
chemist it is of prime importance that the student 
make himself familiar with the fundamental principles 
of the science. This requires a thorough grounding 
in inorganic, physical and in systematic organic 
chemistry. Such training is necessary to enable one 
to think in the science, and only after it has been 
secured should the student branch out in special 
lines. The tree must have a substantial base before 
it can carry the branches. In this connection I 
would call attention to the concluding words of a very 
instructive paper entitled, -'Chemical Positions in the 
Government Service," which appeared in a recent 
issue of Science. 

"I wish to emphasize the fact that every appointee 
should have pursued a broad general course of study. 
The argument is frequently made, and it is doubtless 



true, that the work for which the majority of appoint- 
ments are primarily made, that is, the ordinary rou- 
tine work of the laboratory, could be as well per- 
formed at the beginning by men who are not college 
graduates, and frequently by men whose training in 
chemistry itself has been very incomplete. It is 
found, however, that while such men may be satis- 
factory at the beginning, their potential power is 
limited. Men with special training are frequently 
desired for the purpose of conducting special investi- 
gations. This special training, however, should have 
been received in post-graduate study. The ability to 
conduct researcn work that is constantly required, the 
resource essential to emergencies a-id even the initia- 
tive required by those who take a responsible part in 
the routine work of the laboratory are rarely secured 
except in men with broad fundamental training." 

Another matter should not be overlooked. Those 
who intend to become teachers or investigators should 
make every effort to familiarize themselves with both 
French and German, these languages being especially 
rich in the literature of chemistry. The investigator 
of the future who can only imperfectly ascertain what 
has been done and what is now being done in his 
chosen field, cannot otherwise than find himself 
severely handicapped and likely to fail of the largest 
measure of success. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE. 

Historical Sketches, by F. H. Fowler, '87. 
8. Faculty and Students. 

The trustees, on November 29, 1864, fixed the 
term of president of the college, "During the pleas- 
ure of the trustees," and a vote for president being 
taken, Hon. Henry F. French, one of tne trustees 
and author of "Farm Drainage," who had recently 
returned from Europe, where he had made a tour of 
agricultural observation, and who was serving as agent 
of the state in the matter of the sale of "land scrip," 
received a majority of the votes cast and was elected 
first president of the college. He was then living in 
Cambridge, but immediately removed to Amherst, 
where he concerted plans and a course of study for 
the establishment of the college. The following May 
his salary was established at £3,000, to commence 



January I. 1865. Judge French resigned the presi- 
dency in the fall of 1866, and removed to Boston, 
where he resumed his professional labors. 

In October of that year the executive committee 
was authorized to provide for the care of the property 
in Amherst, and a special committee was appointed 
to confer with Prof. Paul A. Chadbourne of Williams- 
town, a gentleman celebrated for his scientific attain- 
ment's and executive ability, with a view to accepting 
the presidency of the college. The following month 
this committee reported to the trustees, and also sub- 
mitted a letter from Professor Chadbourne embody- 
ing his views in regard to the college. The report 
was accepted, a ballot was taken, and he was unani- 
mously elected. His health, however, was not of the 
best, and he was soon forced to rest from his labors 
and travel in a milder climate. Continued illness, 
however, compelled him to resign the office to which 
he had given himself with enthusiastic interest and 
devotedness, and on July 3, 1867, the trustees very 
reluctantly accepted his resignation. His successor, 
President Clark, said of him: "During the few 
months of his presidency, he labored assiduously to 
organize the college, and contracted for the erection 
of three of the buildings now completed. By his 
large experience and comprehensive views, his prac- 
tical judgment and great energy, he was enabled, im- 
mediately upon his entrance Into his difficult office, 
to Inspire confidence, complete a satisfactory plan of 
organization, and harmonize conflicting views respect- 
ing the location and style of buildings." 

It is not often that a college is forced to have three 
presidents before its first class enters, but such was 
the fortune of M. A. C. The trustees, on August 7, 
acting upon the report of a committee previously ap- 
pointed, unanimously elected Professor Clark to fill 
the vacancy. He at once accepted the honor, and 
suggested that Henry H. Goodell, then an instructor 
in Williston Seminary, be appointed instructor in 
French, Military Tactics and Gymnastics, which was 
done. Prof. Ebenezer S. Snell of Amherst College 
was employed to teach Mathematics during the first 

year. 

In November, 1866, Hon. Levi Stockbridge of 
Hadley, a member of the State Senate of 1865, was 
unanimously chosen superintendent of the farm. His 
proposition was $1 ,500 a year salary, house rent with 



land for private garden, and with the privilege of using 
farm horse when needed for his family. This propo- 
sition was accepted by the trustees, and his term of 
service began April 1st. On February 6, 1867, 
Prof. William S. Clark of Amherst College was 
unanimously elected professor of Botany and Horti- 
culture, but a regular salary was not at that time es- 
tablished. 

These gentlemen. Messrs. Clark, Stockbridge, 
Snell and Goodell, constituted the "original faculty," 
as shown by the trustees' annual report to the Legis- 
lature in January, 1868. This report gave their fac- 
ulty designations as follows: Clark, "President and 
Professor of Botany and Horticulture, and Director 
of the Botanic Garden"; Stockbridge, "Farm Su- 
perintendent and Instructor in Agriculture'; Snell, 
"Professor of Mathematics" ; and Goodell, "Profes- 
sor of Modern Languages, and Instructor in Gymnas- 
tics and Military Tactics." 

President Clark, in this report (Fifth), said con- 
cerning the opening of the college: "It was voted 
to open the college for those who might wish to enter 
the Freshman class, October 2nd. By great effort 
the necessary buildings were completed and furniture 
procured, so that the first term commenced at that 
time. The number of students steadily increased 
until before the close, December 17th, forty-seven 
were admitted to the class. Several others were ex- 
amined, but rejected on account of deficient scholar- 
ship, so that, during the first term, more than fifty 
applied at the college for admission. Besides these, 
nearly as many more, some of them from other 
states, have asked for information, and Intimated a 
wish to enjoy the advantages of the institution." 

This report listed 56 students in the Freshman 
class | 54 from Massachusetts, and one each from 
New Hampshire and Rhode Island. Thirteen of the 
students were from the town of Amherst; 18 were 
from Hampshire county ; 32 of the Massachusetts 
men were from west of Worcester and 22 were from 
east of Worcester ; 43 were from towns and 13 were 
from cities. It is interesting to note that 25 of these 
men were graduated in the class of 1871. Among 
the students listed in this pioneer class, we find the 
names of present Trustees William H. Bowker and 
William Wheeler, Judge Robert W. Lyman and 
present State Senator Arthur D. Norcross. 



12 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




It is also interesting to note that the Washington 
Irving Literary Society, for many years a valuable 
student organization, was founded in 1867. 

In bringing this series of sketches to a close the 
author desires to express his appreciation of the cour- 
tesies extended him by the College Signal, and to 
express also the hope that these gleanings from the 
past have awakened more than passing interest among 
its readers. If these glimpses of the struggles and 
achievements of those who in the past labored not in 
vain that an agricultural college might be established 
among the educational institutions of our Common- 
wealth, shall serve even in a small way to awaken 
a wider interest In the great cause it stands for and a 
deeper sense of the obligations we owe to the pioneers 
who hewed the way for our present magnificent insti- 
tution, then the preparation and publishing of these 
simple sketches has not been in vain. As we catch 
these glimpses of the past and note the development 
of the present, may we look forward in full belief that 
the future holds for our college grander achievements 
than were ever dreamed of by Nichols or Hitchcock, 
Andrew or Wilder, Clark or Chadbourne. 



APPROPRIATION TO FIGHT THE MOTH. 

The retaining, in the agricultural appropriation bill, 
of the item of $250,000 for fighting the gypsy moth in 
New England was a triumph of tact on the part of 
legislators from this section, and one which seems to 
have been rather unexpected. It seems that South- 
ern congressmen wanted a similar appropriation to 
fight the Texas cattle tick, and so they were willing to 
co-operate with the New England members. The 
allowance is larger than had been expected by the 
Department of Agriculture, and will be fully appre- 
ciated by the inhabitants of the sections invested by 
the moths, as well as the corps of workers employed 
in fighting the pest. It should also carry a reminder 
of the serious nature of the menace to inhabitants of 
sections not yet invaded by the moths. Some of the 
towns north and east of Boston do not need to be 
told how serious this menace is, but <t is hard to 
arouse people in regard to an evil not directly under 
their observation. 

If our trees and forests were stripped of foliage in 



midsummer everybody would appreciate the fact that 
a calamity had befallen this region. Tnat is exactly 
what the moths are capable of doing, and the time to 
act in the matter is before the pest has obtained a 
foothold here. The force now organized to fight the 
moths will no doubt keep its pickets in the field to 
warn people of the spread of the moths, and the local 
authorities and the public in general should be alert to 
check such advance, as the best authorities on the 
subject say that it is utterly hopeless to attempt to 
fight the moths by ordinary means where they have 
obtained a firm foothold. For the parts of the 
country already stricken with the pest thsre is some 
hope in the introduction of parasitic enemies of the 
moths, and the progress of the government's efforts 
along this line will be awaited with much interest.— 
Springfield Union. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE STOCKJUDGING 
CONTEST 



The New England Federation of Agricultural Stu- 
dents, at its meeting in Boston in March, practically 
decided to hold an intercollegiate stock-judging con- 
test next fall at one of our big New England fairs, 
probably Brockton. The heads of the several New 
England agricultural colleges are all behind this move- 
ment, and there is no doubt but that it could be car- 
ried through with good success. Professor Hurd of 
Maine, Professor Hills of Vermont, Professor Taylor 
of New Hampshire, and our own President Butter- 
field, as well as the men at Connecticut and Rhode 
Island, are all in earnest in this matter, and it is very 
probable that the Massachusetts Society for Pro- 
moting Agriculture can be enlisted, and that it will 
offer prizes for the contest. The incentive offered 
by a contest like this is creative of a spirit of enthusi- 
asm for the work, and the value of it cannot be esti- 
mated. Such a contest cannot too soon be initiated 
with our intercollegiate life in New England, and the 
New England Federation of Agricultural Students, 
founded last December at Burlington, Vt., as the 
only interstate agricultural association in New England, 
proposes to take this in charge and officer it. It has 
the support of the heads of the several New England 
agricultural institutions, and it must also have the 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



13 



support of every agricultural student. It is for you 
men from Massachusetts to prepare for this contest, 
and show the other states that we have the goods and 
can produce them, with Professor Gribben to show 
us how we ought to go down and wipe the board. To 
Massachusetts belongs the glory from this first New 
England intercollegiate agricultural contest. "Go in 
and win." 

NEW INSTRUCTOR. 

Amherst, May 4— The trustees of the Agricultural 
College have elected as instructor in German, Edgar 
L. Ashley, at present of Bates college, Lewiston, 
Me. Mr. Ashley was graduated from Brown Univer- 
sity with the degree of A. B. in 1903, and of A. M. 
in 1904. He was instructor in German for three 
years in Brown, after which he spent one year abroad, 
taking up special study in German in Heidelberg, 
where he gave a philological treatise before the 
Heidelberg seminary in German the only one of the 
kind given by a foreigner during the year. The last 
year he has had entire charge of the German depart- 
ment of Bates college, with 200 students under him, 
and he has given complete satisfaction. 

Mr. Ashley is 27 years old. He is a native of 
Massachusetts, and a member of the Phi Kappa 
Psi. He will enter upon his duties at the college at 
the beginning of the next college year. 

This instructorship is a new position created by the 
trustees and is intended to meet the new requirements 
in the modern languages. The college next year will 
have an instructor in French and an instructor in 
German, each giving all his time to the special lan- 
guage.— [Springfield Union. 



Y- M. C- A. No-tes. 



Men of M. A. C. should not fail to attend the 
illustrated talk on the Northfield Conference to be 
given in Clarke Hall, May 14th. Last year our col- 
lege was represented at Northfield by a delegation of 
six. Forty should attend this year. Some facts 
regarding the Conference are given below : 

"The Northfield Student Conference for 1908 will 
be held, as usual, on the grounds of the Northfield 
Seminary. East Northfield. The opening session is 



appointed for Friday evening. June 26, at 7-30 
o'clock ; the closing for Sunday night, July 5. 

That the Conference is truly an intercollegiate affair 
is evidenced by the fact that In 1907, there were 
present 756 students from 159 institutions of Canada 
and the eastern United States. Nor was the repre- 
sentative character confined to numbers. In 
evidences of leadership, ability and personal attractive- 
ness, the delegates very clearly belonged to the best 
types of American college men. The 11,125 stu- 
dents who, through the past tweny-three years, have 
come to Northfield, have long since established its 
reputation as a rallying-point for the finest and most 
representative men of the colleges. 

The life of the Conference Is truly wholesome. 
Every afternoon, except Sunday, during the ten days, 
is given over to athletic sports of various kinds. A 
series of baseball games for the college championship, 
a tennis tournament with 150 or more entries, swim- 
ming in the Connecticut, tramping expeditions about 
the country, a track meet and unique celebration on 
the Fourth of July— these offer to every man some 
form of athletic enjoyment that will contribute to the 
wholesome effects of the conference life. 

Real friendships are formed during these days. 
Men of common interest in the fundamental things of 
life come together in a delightfully informal manner 
and find in each other characteristics that make for 
strong and permanent friendship. The enlarging of 
men's circle of acquaintance, alone, makes the ten 
days of value in the development of a richer and more 
enjoyable life. Perhaps the strongest impression one 
receives, however, is that life must be lived in sin- 
cerity and integrity with all the energy one possesses. 
The necessity of a real and vital religious faith is 
made evident, perhaps most effectively by the mere 
presence of men who are living such a life. With an 
attractive sternness the life of highest service becomes 
concrete and real before a man's eyes, demanding 
the attention which he now is most wiliing to give. 
It does not mean that every man will choose the pro- 
fession of a foreign missionary or a clergyman; by far 
the larger part will not. But it does mean that what- 
ever profession or calling he may adopt, in it he will 
be really a missionary of the deepest things of life and 
a minister to the life of the men about him." 




»4 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



D*p&rtm?irt" ^lot*s. 



WEST EXPERIMENT STATION— DEPART- 
MENT OF FERTILIZERS. 
At the present time three hundred and sixty samples 
of fertilizers and fertilizing materials have been col- 
lected in the Massachusetts markets. 

For the next three weeks samples will be collected 
in the middle and western sections of the state. The 
collection usually includes between from five hundred 
and fifty to six hundred samples. 

Mr. W. K. Hepburn has had charge of the collec- 
tion of samples the present season. Since January 
1st eighty-one samples of fertilizing materials, refuse 
by products, soils and miscellaneous substances have 
been forwarded by the farmers of the state for free 
analysis. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOODS AND FEEDING. 
The investigations concerning the composition of 
butter-fat as modified by food and stage of lactation 
are being still continued, and will not be completed 
before mid-summer. Work of this character requires 
constant and critical attention. 

The Station has recently added to its equipment an 
electrical drying oven manufactured by the Interna- 
tional Investment Co., of Cambridge. The oven 
holds a very constant temperature, and appears thus 
far to be giving a very high degree of satisfaction. 

The department has received a number of impor- 
tant German and Austrian scientific publications, 
among which may be mentioned Ulzer and Klimont's 
work on the Physical and Chemical Character of Fat, 
Kellner's Summary of the Work of the German Ex- 
periment Stations on Animal Nutrition, the 6th report 
of the Halle Experiment Station, and the most im- 
portant publication entitled, "The Nitrogen Fertiliza- 
tion of Agricultural Plants," put out under the direc- 
tion of Professor Wagner of Darmstad. 

LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 
The senior class in landscape gardening this year 
will have a new experience in the way of practical in- 
struction. Professor Waugh has made arrangements 
with Mr. J. A. Pettigrew, superintendent of parks in 
Boston, to take the class to Boston for an entire week. 
Mr. Pettigrew very kindly supplies quarters in the park 
buildings for the work to be carried on, and co-operates 



in other ways to give the students every opportunity 
they could desire. The whole time will be devoted 
to practical study of park design and management, 
not merely to a visit of inspection. Headquarters 
will be at Franklin Park, one of the best examples of 
park design in America and one of the best examples 
of the work of the late Frederick Law Olmsted. 

Various members of the senior class in landscape 
gardening are engaged in professional work all over 
the country. Flint has been doing several gardens 
in Amesbury, Springfield, etc., Cobb has been in 
Rochester, with a famous New York firm ; Miller has 
been filling an extended engagement in Pennsylvania; 
Turner is looking after some plantings in Providence, 
designed by Professor Waugh. Professor Waugh 
has also been doing some landscape work In Middle- 
bury, Vt. 

AGRICULTURE. 

We are Informed that breeders of registered stock 
in the Connecticut valley are uniting their interests 
by forming an association. Look for a rousing meet- 
ing in the near future. 



Alumni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 
The Sophomore- Senior promenade will be held 
June 16, 1908. For particulars and invitations 
address Harold Allen, Amherst. 

NOTICE 1905.— The class will hold its Trien 
nial Reunion at Amherst, June 16, 1908. 

P. F. Williams, Sec. 

Ex-'75.— Died October last, in New York, George 
C. Andrae. The cause of his death was acute indi- 
gestion. He had been fairly prosperous in his affairs. 
A widow survives him. 

'82. E. S. Chandler. Address for the summer, 

North Judson, Indiana, R. F. D. No. 3. 

'88.— S. H. Field of North Hatfield married to 
Miss Alice N. Clark of Northampton. 

'90. The fertilizer inspection at the Experiment 

Station is now under full headway. Two inspectors 
are busy collecting samples, and the same are being 
examined as rapidly as possible under the supervision 
of the chemist in charge of the work, Mr. H. D. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'5 



Haskins. Mr. Haskins is also cooperating with Dr. 
Paige in an experiment designed to detect the toxic 
effect of arsenate of lead upon farm animals. 

'91. — The preliminary announcement of the third 
session of the Graduate School of Agriculture to be 
held July 6th to the 31st, 1908, at Cornell Univer- 
sity, Ithaca, N. Y., and the New York Agricultural! 
Experiment Station, Gereva, N. Y., contains among! 
its list of faculty the name of Dr. E. P. Felt, state J 
entomologist of New York. 

'95.— Born, March 12, to Mr. and Mrs. H. L. 
Frost of Arlington, a son, Edmund Lake. 

'96 Short Course.— E. W. Capen, M. D., of 
Monson, was chosen president of the Western Mass. 
Homoeopathic Medical Society at their annual meet- 
ing held March 18, at the Cooley House, Springfield. 

'97. — The farmers of Sunderland and vicinity have 
recently requested the Experiment Station to analyze 
the cream sold by them to Tait Bros, of Springfield. 
This work Involves the monthly examinations of 130 
samples, and is under the supervision of Mr. P. H. 
Smith. 

'01. — L. A. Root of Northampton has sold his 



farm and leased the farm of C. H. Kellogg at North 
Amherst. Address, Amherst. 

'02.— H. E. Hodgkiss has resigned his position as 
assistant to the state entomologist of New York and 
returned to his former position at the New York 
Agricultural Experiment Station. Address. Geneva, 
N. Y. 

'02.- -F. R. Church recently visited Amherst. 

'04.— Arthur W. Gilbert has been awarded a fel- 
lowship in Agriculture at Cornell University consist- 
ing of $500 per year, in order to carry on post- 
graduate work. 

'04. — A. L. Peck, who is now an assistant In the 
Department of Horticulture, Kansas Agricultural 
College, is to start in this spring with the develop- 
ment of a landscape gardening course In that 
institution. 

'05. — W. A. Munson has come to Amherst to 
take charge of the Bay Road Fruit Farm for Profes- 
sors Waugh and Sears. 

'06.— C. A. Tirrell, 200 Fremont St., Chicago, 
ill. 

'07. — C. H. Parker is assisting his father in run- 
ning a farm in New Hampshire. 



Rj£Ar>Y 



FOR YOUR INSPECTION. 



towc &°THe? SH8P 

"•ANfc/s Wekome-Wyoroot 
Amherst Hoise Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT OF 4 JUlvSINICKS. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 
spring. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Akthuk E. Dokk. 



L. H. TOURTKLOTTK. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE DKALKR8 AMD JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers 



Corner North and Union St9., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 

THE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., - 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 




THK I.AKGKST COLLEGE KNGKAV 
INO HOt'SK IN THE WORLD. 



Works: 17th Street & Lehigh Ave, 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 

J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES, BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS 

J, H.TROTT 



PLUP1BER. STEM J BBS FITTER. 

RIB DEALER II STOVES 1KB MUSES. 



Shop 15 1-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



K8T\HLISHEI» 1851. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITURE/ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLHTK LINK OF GOODS 
SITITKD TO THK BTUDKNT8' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205 -I'll Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMI'OKTKRB AMD MANUFACTURERS Of 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY QOODS. 



We handle the best of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amhbrst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



» J 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Ncur Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rales to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS. 



J. A. 

PLEASANT ST., 



URNER. 

OVER AMHERST BAKEKY 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINE Of 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER <fc CO. 



All the Magazines. 



Daily and Sunday Papers. 






ArtHa$f , aa$$. 








THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSINO, MICHIGAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



SHORT COURSE MEN 
I place buttermakers, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. 0. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAII^OK STOR5 
II AMITY STREET, - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 



It's Your Next at the 



Meisl House BarDer snap 



Four First Class Barbers 



FOR MEN 



Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 8 1'. M. 


Tuesdays ; 


. 11 


6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


. it 


8 « 


Thursdays, j 


11 


6 «' 


Fridays, ; 


, it 


8 " 


Saturdays, j 


r " 


11 " 




C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
KEISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES. IMPORTED DIKECT 
FROM LONDON. 




JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 

Rahar's Jim, 

OH South Street, off Hafts, NORTHAMPTON, MASS 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



• 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Fxcellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Base. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 ' Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE 00E-P1TIP1ER Mill 



J4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 




In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 

goods have character 

— our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

344 WASHINGTON ST.. BOSTON 

.8 WEST 3°™ ST.. NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R. I. Cambridge, Mass. 




"For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

1$. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Bank, AMHERS I 



Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, 07, 08 Classes. 




Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and floods. 

COX SONS <& VINING. 

262 Fourth Av , New York. 



tm 





r.-^i 



*THE*«e#- 



flfoassacbusetts 
Bgricultural 

Collcac 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Shout Winter Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2. A FOUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst, Mass. 



' 



THE COLLEGE SMAL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 15 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 20. 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 



E. E. MILLET1 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 
Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOLIN, BANJO, MAMDOlilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 





OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



GO TO . . . 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



page's Shoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



the: college signal 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. MAY 20. 1908 



NO. 15 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication, should be addressed. Coll.o. S.oha L . Anhssst. Mass. Tm. S.onm wUI be 
JtT.U briber. untiM.s discontinuance ,, ordered and arrears are paid. Subscriber, who do not receive their paper regularly are requeued to 

notify the Business M a nager. __ . __ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE, 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRICCS, 1909, Business Manager. 
E F DAMON, 1910, Assistant Business Manager. 
R C POTTER 1909. College Notes. W. R. CLARKE. 1910, Department Note, 

M F CEER 1909. Alumni Notes. ^ C ' BROWN ' " ,0 ' "*"* """ 

C H WHITE. .909. Y. M. C. A. Notes. H. A. BROOKS 1910. Special. 

R. N. HALLOWELL. 1911. 
S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 






Term., »l.uo per .ear I. sdoesc. Sltsgl. Copi... 10c Pofg s oaf id. ol Uait.d State, aod Canada. S»c extra 



SIGKAL'S DIRECTORY 



Athletic Board. 
Foot-Ball Association, 
basket- Ball Association, 
base Ball Association. 



Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. 
M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager 
S. S. Crossman, Manager. 
College Senate, 



Fraternity Conference. 
Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E.GIIlett. President 



J. R. Parker. Pres. 

R. D. Lul 1 . Manager. 

C. H. White. Pre.. 

H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as »econd-clas» matter. Post Office at Amher.t 



Editorials. 



The Signal will be represented at the annual con- 
vention of the New England Intercollegiate Press 
Association to be held in Boston, Thursday, May 21. 



President Butterfield was one of the three com- 
missioners of forestry sent by Massachusetts to the 
Conference on the Conservation and Use of National 
Resources at Washington, D. C, last week. 



It is to be hoped that all the Juniors will take 
advantage of the forestry course the first week in 
June by attending evejy exercise possible. Every 
intelligent citizen should understand the principles of 
deforestation and reforestation if for no other reason 
than to the better appreciate the vital need of legis- 
lation in the matter in order that he may exercise his 
suffrage right wisely and profitably. 

The College Signal herewith extends thanks to 
F. H. Fowler for the series of historical sketches just 



concluded and expresses with him the hope that they 
have served a useful purpose. Mr. Fowler has 
offered to supply the material for a similar series of 
sketches covering the first ten years of college life. 
These will appear in the fall. No reader should fail 
to study these articles carefully and endeavor to catch 
some of the spirit of those pioneer days and some of 
the loyalty that prompts the author to contribute so 
generously from his reminiscent store to the columns 
of his college paper. 



The biggest item in the appropriation bill, now 
at last a reality, is the $34,000 for a hall of 
floriculture and attached range of greenhouses for 
which preliminary plans are being drawn. It ought 
to mean more than simply added facilities for meet- 
ing the demand of students coming here for a train- 
ing in floriculture. It ought to mean that the florists 
of the state are going to be enlisted in the broadening 
circle of enterprises in which our institution is 
engaged just as well as the farmers, the fruit-growers 
and the gardeners. With glass-houses of a commer- 











THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



cial type, protecting commercial crops grown in a 
commercial manner, the College can meet the 
requirements of the rising generation of American 
florists who are not satisfied with following in the 
steps of their fathers with trowel and watering-can, 
but must have a deeper insight into the why and the 
wherefore of a plant's existence than can ordinarily 
be obtained in a life-time through individual effort in 
a commercial establishment. That young men can- 
not get this broader knowledge of floriculture from 
working at commercial places may be explained by 
calling attention to the rapid progress of specialization 
in the florist's trade as in so many American indus- 
tries. Now there are hundreds, probably thousands 
of Intelligent young men in the country who desire to 
advance In this profession but are handicapped by 
being with a small firm or a firm making a specialty 
of one or two things or by being confined to a single 
section of a large commercial establishment and thus 
prevented from becoming acquainted with things 
beyond their confines. If the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College can supply the needs of the Bay 
State contingent of this vast army of ambitious flori- 
culturists she will have served the commonwealth in 
another instance and secondarily will have brought a 
flower-loving public into closer sympathy with our 
Alma Mater. 



chalked up to them, Johnson, at first, making three 
misplays. The score: 



O Donnell. s.. 
Shattuck, 2. 
F.Warner, I.. 
Hubbard, p., 
TlHon, 3, 
Johnson. I . 
O'Grad), m.. 
T. Warner, r., 
French, c. 
Totals. 



Hitchcock. I.. 
Thomas 2. 
Cooper, s. 
Sanderson. 3, 
Halligan. m.. 
Bell. r.. 
Cottrell. p. . 
Tabb. c. 
Brown. I, 

Totals. 

Innings, 
Massachusetts 
Worcester "' Tech 



MASSACHUSETTS 

A.m. 

5 
4 
5 
S 
5 
5 
4 
5 
5 

43 




2 

I 

u 

I 
I 

I 
1 
2 



WORCESTER " TECH." 

A.B. U. 



J 






5 

4 
5 
4 
5 
4 
3 
5 
4 

39 

4 5 

I 







1 
1 
I 



I 



2 



P.O. 

I 

3 


2 
8 

2 
I I 

27 



P.O. 

3 
I 
2 
2 
I 


1 

8 
9 

27 

7 





2 
5 

I 





2 

lu 



A. 


3 
1 




5 

I 

10 

8 9 
I 2- 
1 



/Uhlctic NottS- 



BASEBALL. 

M. A. C.i 7; Worcester Tech., 4. 

From the Republican: 

The Massachusetts "Aggies" walloped Worcester 
"Tech"' on the Oval this afternoon, 7 to 4. Hub- 
bard had the local batsmen at his mercy and allowed 
only six scattered hits, not one of them going for an 
extra base. He struck out nine men and passed 
three. Shattuck and French carried off the batting 
honors for the "Aggies, " the backstop making the 
only extra base hit of the game — a two-sacker. For 
"Tech" the game was without a feature. Cooper 
and Sanderson, at short and third base, respectively, 
had eight errors. The game was played in a drizzle. 
The ball was wet, and the soggy ground made some 
of the errors excusable. The visitors had six errors 



Runs— Cooper, Sanderson 2. Brown. F. Warner. Tilton 3, O Grady 
Warner. French. Two-base hit— French. Struck out— by Hubbard 
Cottrell 4. First base on balls— off Hubbard 3. off Cottrell I. h 
pitcher— Bell. Passed ball— French. Umpire— Malone. Time- 2 

M. A. C, I ; Univ. of Vermont, 0. 

The University of Vermont baseball team was 
defeated on the Campus Tuesday, May 12. The 
hitting on both sides was light, Vermont leading with 
six. Massachusetts three. The fielding by the home 
team was perfect, while the visitors made thre- 
errors. The features were the all-round good work 
of Burrington, and fast fielding by F. Warner an: 
Tilton. French injured his ankle while stealing 
second In the tifth but remained in the game. In 
the third, with one down, Chet Warner got to first on 
a dropped throw, advanced on French's drive pas; 
short, both advanced on a wild pitch. O' Donnell 
hit to Paquet, who threw too high to catch Warner 
at the plate, O'Donnell taking second on the play. 
Shattuck tried to sacrifice French home from third 
but Hunt handled the bunt too fast for that, and 
French was caught at the plate. Cobb fouled out I 
Burrington. In the fifth, Haynes drew a pass ana 
stole second, but the next two struck out, and Hunt 
filed to left. The sixth began with two scratch hits 
and a wild pitch, but the side was retired on a foul to 
French, a strike-out ; and a weak roller to Cobb 
Haynes drew his second walk in the seventh, stole 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



but was caught off his base; Cobb to O'Donnell. 
Watkins struck out, but the third strike was dropped, 
and he reached first, and stole. He died on Smith's 
second strike-out, and Hunt's high foul to Tilton, 
Vermont had eight men left on bases during the game. 
The score : 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

A.*. R R. S.H 



O'Donnell, s. s., 
Shattuck. 2 b . 
Cobb, p., 
F. Warner, I. f , 
Hubbard I b. 
Tilton. 3 b., 
O Grady, c. f.. 
T Wamer. r. f. 
French c. 

Totals, 



Gardner, s. s.. 
Burrington, c. 
Collins, r. f.. 
Paquet, 3 b., 
Mcconnell. I. f., 
Haynes. c. f.. 
Watkins 1 b.. 
Smith. 2 b., 
Hunt, p., 



4 
4 
4 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

29 










I 






o 

i 



I 
(J 



u 

I 



AH 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
2 
3 
4 
3 



VERMONT. 

R. 













I 
2 
I 
I 



I 

o 
o 
o 






o 
I 





u 





S.H. 








I 



o 



P.O. 

1 
I 


2 
12 
2 
2 

7 

27 



P.O. 

I 

II 



1 


2 
9 






1 
5 


b 




12 



A. 
I 

3 

2 




5 



Rockwood. 2. 
Allen. I., 

Schermerhorn. I . 
Brown, a., 
Partridge. J 
Leonard, m.. 
Clouea, r . 
Blaney, p., 
Thomas, c. 

Totals, 
Innings. 

Westfleld High. 

Sophomores. 



SOPHOMORES. 

a. a. 

3 

4 
4 
4 
4 
I 
3 
4 
3 



u 



1 
I 
I 




1 









12 



4 
I 


3 

4 



A. 

4 


I 

4 
I 



2 
2 






J 

2 
2 
2 

I 


2 



30 



I 2 3 

I C 




•l 


u 





u 



b 





24 

7 
I 
I 



14 12 

8 9 

9 x— II 
I 0— 2 



Runs-Keenan 2. Tierney 2. Williams 2, F. Smith, Atwater. Sime. 

n bases— Tierney, Atwater. Rockwood, I* 
t-Wllliams. First base on balls— off CI 
les. Left on bases— Westfleld 7. Sophomo 
ay Clapp 12. Allen 2. Schemerhorn. Brown. Partridge. 
Leonard. C'oues 2. Blaney 3, Thomas. S. Smith. Tierney. Passed ball- 



Total bases— Westfleld 1 2. Sophomores 2 

-c 
9! Struck out-by Clapp 12. Allen 2. Schemerhorn, Brown. I 



Clapp 2. Rockwood. Leonard. Total bases-Westfleld 12. Sophomori 
Sacrifice hits— Strong. Stolen bases— Tierney. Atwater. Rockwood. Pari 
ridge. Leonard. Two-base hit-Williams. First base on balls-off Clapp 

5, Rockwood. Leonard 3. Cloues 



Smith. Wild pitch -Clapp. Time— I hour, 55 minutes 
Smith. Attendance— 475 



Umpire- W. J 



Totals. 32 b I 

Stolen bases— French. Gardner, Haynes 2. Watkins 
by Cobb 2. Struck out—by Cobb 7. by Hunt 8 
Wi'd pitch— Hunt. Cobb. Time— I hour, 45 " 



24 II 3 

. Bases on balls- 
Passed baU— French, 
inutes. Umpire— Foley. 



Westfield High School vs '10. 

From the Republican: 

Westfield High defeated the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College sophomores at Westfield yesterday 
afternoon, 1 1 to 2. The game was interesting until 
the eighth inning, when the home team found Blaney 
for five hits, which, combined with errors, netted 
nine runs. The feature was the batting of Williams 
and F. Smith. Clapp pitched a strong game for the 
home team, allowing but four scattered hits and 
striking out 12 men. Westfield played well through- 
out, having but one error. The visitors on the other 
hand made 12 misplays, many of which figured In 
the home team's scoring. For the visitors Rockwood 
and Blaney played the best ball. The score : 



Keenan, s.. 
S. Smith, 1. 
Tiefney, m.. 
Williams, 3, 
F. Smith, e.. 
Strong, I , 
Atwater. r., 
Sime, 2, 
Clapp, p.. 

Totals. 



WRSTFIRLD HIGH. 
AS. 

5 

5 
5 
5 
5 

4 
4 
4 
4 



2 

o 

2 
3 
3 






I 



P.O. 


7 
I 

2 
12 

2 
3 




2 

I 

2 
I 
1 
I 
1 
3 



41 



1 I 



27 



12 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET. 

Through the kindness of the Amherst College 
authorities we have been able to secure Pratt Field 
for the final meet which will take place on Friday 
May 22 at 2 p. m. The admission will be twenty- 
five cents. 

The meet will be similar to the indoor meet held 
several months ago but owing to the fact that this 
will be out of doors it has been possible to introduce 
several new events. 

The class having the largest total of points In the 
Indoor and spring meets will be awarded a unique 
silver cup, upon which the class numerals will be 
engraved. The cup will occupy a conspicuous place 
in the trophy room as a trophy of the successful class. 

The indoor meet, which took place in the Drill 
Hall not only created a good deal of interest but 
showed us that there are strong track men among 
our ranks, who were but awaiting the opportunity to 
become developed. 

Track athletics in order to become a success 
here demands the support of the entire student body. 
Students who for any reason cannot participate In the 
events should at least show their Interest by being 
present Friday. 

The fact that the results of the last meet were so 
closely contested and that this meet determines the 
"winner of the cup," should stimulate an active 
interest in every student in this progressing and pop- 
ular sport. 



I 



r 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE. 

Manager Thompson has announced his schedule 
for next fall. There are several changes, among the 
most noticeable being the annual game with Amherst, 
which will not be played this year. For some 
reason unknown the management was not 
able to arrange a game but in its place has secured 
one with Yale. The Amherst game will be missed, 
despite the addition of Yale, as great rivalry has 
existed between the teams. The usual games with 
Williams, Dartmouth, Tufts and the Springfield 
Training School are again on the schedule. "Mat" 
Bullock, the old Dartmouth end, who turned out 
such a strong team last year, will again coach and 
Manager Thompson is hoping to secure the services 
of W.A.Munson, captain in 1904. to help. Captain 
Turner called out the men for spring practice last Sat- 
urday and this work will probably be continued for two 
weeks. Although the team will lose five men the 
prospect looks bright and with a good schedule a suc- 
cessful year should result. The schedule follows. 
Sept. 26, Rhode Island State College at Amherst. 
Oct. 3, Dartmouth at Hanover. 

10, University of Maine at Portland. 

17. Worcester "Tech" at Amherst. 

24, Williams at Williamstown. 

31, Yale at New Haven. 
Nov. 7, New Hampshire College at Manchester. 

14, Springfield training School at Springfield. 

2 1 , Tufts at Medford. 



Collcg* N<>*«- 



F. C. Pray, '06, W. E. Dickinson, '07, were 
about college a few days this week. 

Preparations for the junior minstrel show are com- 
pleted and a fine entertainment is expected. 

It may be of interest to some to know that Profes- 
sor Holcomb is now living in Montague on a farm. 

Professor F. A. Waugh entertained his parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Waugh. the first part of the 
month. 

Floyd W. Jenks of Indiana visited the College 
recently to Inspect the department of agricultural 
education. 



Operations for a new machine shop and also a 
large hose room have been started at the heating and 
lighting plant. 

President Butterfield spoke Thursday, May 7, 
before the Hampshire Pomona Grange at 
Williamsburg. 

Captain Martin gave a fine talk on Gen. Robert E. 
Lee. May 17. The story of the life of such a man 
was well worth hearing. 

Dr. Tuckerman of Amherst gave a very interesting 
talk on the "Lingual Papillae" before the Natural 
History Club on Tuesday, May 12. 

Rev. Ora S. Gray of Amherst gave an inspiring 
address before the student body at assembly last 
Wednesday on "Three Elements of Success." 

The college has lately purchased two fine Per 
cheron horses from Boston. They were raised in the 
western part of the country and weigh 3100 pounds. 

Nearly fifty pupils of the high schools of the Con- 
necticut valley were about College on the 15th. The 
battalion drill and a baseball game were the features 
of the day. 

On the evening of May 8. G. Charles Rowe, stew- 
ard, was seriously injured by being kicked in the face 
by a horse. He is attended by Dr. Joab Stowell 
who is of the opinion that there Is no fracture of the 
skull. 

President Howard Edwards of the Rhode Island 
College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts addressed 
the assembly last Wednesday, May 13. In well- 
wrought phrases he presented the pressing situation 
of the forests of the country and immediate need of 
conservation. 

The Bay Road fruit farm is a busy place these 
days. Professors Waugh and Sears with W. A. 
Munson, '05. in charge have been putting the land 
into shape to receive six thousand apple trees, three 
thousand peach trees and five hundred plum trees. 
Quantities of nitrate of soda, tankage and other fer- 
tilizers have been used. 

The two mortars which have lain in the fort west 
of the drill-hall for so many years have been removed 
according to orders and sent to the Watershops in 
Springfield where they will be used to make new 
castings. It is unfortunate that they could not have 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



been retained as souvenirs but lack of funds at the 
disposal of the military department prevented their 
purchase. 



HIGH SCHOOL DAY. 

On May 15, a new day was successfully inaugurated 
at college, known as High School Day. This is one 
of President Butterfield 's plans for the further adver- 
tising of the college and it will be an annual occasion, 
the object being to invite to the college for a day the 
Senior classes of the High Schools of the state to 
bring before their notice the different departments 
and features of the college life in the hope that some 
of them may be influenced to make this institution 
their choice for further education. About 140 high 
school pupils came, attended by teachers and in some 
cases by school officials. Eight schools were repre- 
sented approximately as follows : Amherst. 50 pupils ; 
Holyoke. 25: Greenfield, 24 ; Chicopee. 20 ; East- 
hampton, II; Bernardston. 5; Turners Falls. 4; 
South Hadley, 1 . The visitors began to arrive at 10 
o'clock and were shown all the places of interest 
about the college. The following program was car- 
ried OUt : 

10-00 a. m. Inspection of Department of Entomology. 
10-45 Inspection of Department of Botany. 

1 1-30 Inspection of Department of Chemistry. 

12-30 Luncheon at Draper Hall. 

1-30 p. m. Military Drill. College Campus. 

2-30 Visit to College Barn. 

3-00 Ball game-Amherst High School vs. Holyoke 

High School. 



office and a room for the exhibition of material used 
in greenhouse construction. The basement will con- 
tain soil room , a cool room for bulbs and rooms for 
storage of pots and implements. 

The greenhouse range as now planned will consist 
of a palm house 30 by 40 feet on the east end of the 
general work room. From the south side of this 
work room a house 12 feet wide and about 180 feet 
long will run directly south. This will be used for 
propagation and for general plants. On the east and 
west sides of this narrow house the special houses of 
the range will be built. This will provide for a full 
southern exposure of each house. The range as 
planned includes a students' house for special student 
work, 50 by 30 feet, violet house. 24 by 50 feet, 
chrysanthemum and bedding-plant house. 24 by 50 
feet, lettuce house. 24 by 50 feet. These will be 
even-span houses. The range will also include a rose 
house. 24 by 50 feet, a carnation house, cucumber 
house and tomato house each of the same dimensions. 
These will be three-quarter span houses. This range 
will be built as durable as possible with Iron frame 
and cement foundation and benches. 



NEW GREENHOUSES. 

In the appropriation bill, recently signed by the 
lieutenant-governor is an appropriation of $34,000 for 
a new range of greenhouses of modern commercial 
type with an attached teaching building for use of the 
floricultural department. It is not the intention of 
the college to engage in commercial floriculture, but 
a new range adapted to giving the students up-to-date 
instruction in methods of growing cut flowers for the 
trade is badly needed. It is expected to build an 
instruction building costing about $15,000. This 
will contain a large laboratory and work room to 
accommodate at least fifty men at one time, a class- 
room for one hundred men. smaller class rooms. 



FOOTBALL REPORT. 

RECEIPTS. 

Guarantees away from home, 

Taxes, 

Subscriptions from faculty and 
Mr. Rowe. 



$919.90 
373.00 



25.50 



-$1,318.40 



EXPENSES. 

Guarantees and expenses, home 

games, 
Expenses of trips, 
Coaching, 
Wright & Ditson. 
Claflin, shoes, 
Printing. 
Dr. Rawson, 
Incidentals. 



$ 81.50 

888.68 

50.00 

192.51 

45.00 

25.50 

1. 00 

30.97 
$1,315.16 



Cash on hand, 



$3.24 
T. A. Barry, Manager. 
Approved by J. N. Summers, Auditor. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

May 21.— Y. M. C. A. 

22.— Inspection by U.S. Regular Army officer 

in the morning. Interclass track meet 

in the afternoon. Junior Minstrel Show 

In the evening. 

23.— Informal at Drill Hall. 

24— Chapel, 9-15. Speaker, Prof. R. W. 

Neal. Subject. Sidney Lanier. 
26.— Stockbrldge Club. 

27.— Natural History Club. Speaker. Dr. C. 
H.Fernald. Assembly, 1-30. Speaker, 
Hon. Alfred S. Roe of Worcester, 
28.— Y. M. C. A. 
30. — Memorial Day. 
June 2— Stockbridge Club. 
3. — Assembly, 1-30. 



JUNIOR BANQUET. 

On Friday evening at 1 1 o'clock the Junior class 
sat down to a banquet at the Garde Hotel in Hart- 
ford, Conn. Before the banquet the various mem- 
bers of the class sought out the places of amusement 
and gathered in the hotel at 10-30. The banquet 
hall was tastefully decorated with trailing roses and 
vases of flowers on the table. The menu was excel- 
lent and the best of service provided. After the 
menu was disposed of, a few class and college songs 
were sung together with yells for College. Toast- 
master White opened the second part with a few 
introductory remarks and then introduced the joint 
speaker Mr. Lindblad. He spoke on fair weather, 
showing how the class had good clear weather ahead. 
The next speaker was Mr. Brown who gave a good 
bit of college history in the past and present. Mr. 
Geer spoke next on the interesting topic ' ' Our Fac- 
ulty Annex." The several new members of the fac- 
ulty were discussed at length by him in a particularly 
good way. Mr. Hubbard then spoke on the past and 
present. His was a good talk showing well how the 
class had achieved victories for her Alma Mater. 
The next subject was the "Gentler Sex.'" As they 
are essentially a part of every college man's life Mr. 
Potter was called upon to speak for them. He 



Mr. Crosby spoke on the subject "Be Joyful," and 
his was as interesting as could be. Toastmaster 
White then introduced Mr. Turner. He gave the 
toast "Naughty- nine." His was a strong speech. 
In it he brought out the part '09 must play for Alma 
Mater. With a few songs and yells the banquet 
closed and then that best of all songs, "Sons of Old 
Mass'chusetts," was sung by the class. The whole 
spirit of the banquet seemed to be summed up in this 
phrase, "Be watch dogs of our Alma Mater." The 
college and the part played in the college by the class 
was the sentiment expressed by each speaker. And 
so with the watchward and motto "E Pluribus 
Unum" the class of 1909 passed the junior banquet." 

MENU. 

Oysters on Shell. 
Celery. 

Soft Shell Crabs. Tartar. 

Julienne Potatoes. 

Sweetbread Croquettes. 

French Peas. 

Benedictine Punch. 

Broiled Spring Chicken. 

String Beans. Stuffed Egg Plant. 

Salade Vanderbilt. 

Ice Cream. Petits Foms. 

Roquefort. Bents. 

Coffee. 



ANNUAL MEET OF N. E. I. A. A. 

The annual meet of the New England Intercolle- 
giate Athletic Association will be held this year at 
Technology Field, Brookline, on May 22 and 23. 
Eleven New England colleges, who are members of 
the association will be represented. These are: 
Dartmouth, Brown, Amherst, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Will'ams, Wesleyan, Bowdoin, Uni- 
versity of Vermont, University of Maine, Tufts and 
Trinity. 

In the early meets this season many of the New 
England teams have shown great ability, and the 
meet this year promises to be a closer fight than it 
has been for a long time. 

Dartmouth, which has won the meet for the last 
two years, is the general favorite for the coming con- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The events to be run off are as follows : 100 yard 

dash, 120 yard hurdles, 440 yard dash, one mile 

run, two mile run, 220 yard hurdles, 220 yard dash, 

880 yard dash, shot put. pole vault, running high 

lump, hammer throw, running broad jump and discus 

throw. 

By special arrangement this year all the elimina- 
tion trials except the semi-finals in the 100 yard dash 
and the 120 yard hurdles will be run on Friday, thus 
doing away with the necessity of trial heats on the 
following day. 

This meet has previously been held on Worcester 
Oval. The association, however, this year decided 
it would be best to change to the Boston track. 

The Technology field contains a track of four laps 
to the mile, with a 220 yard straight-away. Extra 
stands will be erected at the time of the meet for 
the accommodation of spectators. 



look into that college in Massachusetts with a view of 
establishing some such course. We Pennsylvanians 
do not want to be behind that state in educational 
lines, and the writer hopes that some trustee, botany, 
or entomology professor may read this letter and give 
it some thought, for the work of a forester and ento- 
mologist combined is going to be a leading profes- 
sion and a life work. 

[Editor's Note.— The above article was written by an 
alumnus of the class of 07 and appeared in the Philadelphia 
Public Ledger of March 17. 1908.) 



test. The other colleges that are expected to stand 
showed that '09 was keeping a good record thus far I high are Amherst, Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
and promised to take the lead for the following year. Lgy, Brown and Williams. 



FORESTRY AND ENTOMOLOGY. 

FLEA FOR COLLEGE TRAINING FOR A COMING PROFES- 
SION AND BUSINESS. 

Looking back over a period of 15 or 20 years many 
of us can recollect that little attention was given the 
fine old specimen trees, and it is only within the last 
dozen years that people have begun to realize that 
they cannot have a beautiful estate or little home 
without fruit or shade trees. 

We do not realize the value of a thing until we 
lose it, and trees are one of the things that are apt to 
be easily lost : but with the modern methods of today 
there is no reason why the life of that grand old oak, 
spreading chestnut or any aged specimen cannot be 
prolonged from 10 to 30 years. Young trees, too, 
fast on their way to destruction have been cared for 
and are today in a healthy condition, giving their 
shade to the children in the squares or adding to the 
value of real estate. 

To one agricultural college and a few men outside 
the writer believes that the modern tree doctoring 
along with entomology owes its origin. There is only 
one agricultural college in the country that 1 know of 
today that is turning out each year a few specially 
trained young men who are experts in the treatment 
of trees. It seems to me that it might be a good 
plan for the head of every state agricultural college to 



FORESTRY SCHEDULE 1908. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

Monday, June I .—2-30 to 5-30 p. m. 

Tuesday, June 2.— 2-30 to 4-20 p. m. 

Wednesday, June 3. — 8-15 to 10-15 a.m., 4-30to 

5-30 p. m. 
Thursday. June 4.— 2-30 to 4-30 p. m. 
Friday. June 5.— 2-30 to 5 30 p. m. 
Saturday, June 6.— Forenoon voluntary exercise, If 

desired. 

WITH OUR CO-WORKERS. 

Connecticut Agricultural College. 

Prof. E. 0. Smith has been appointed by the board 
of trustees to act as president of the college from the 
time when President Stimson's term of office expires 
in June until such time as President-elect Beach shall 
take charge of the college. 

The college will hold its seventh annual summer 
school devoted to nature and country life July 1-24. 
It is expected that the school will be in charge of 
Professor Smith. 



Y- M. C- A. |i«Us. 



The Bible Committee are now organizing the 
courses of study to be followed next fall and will make 
a systematic canvass for enrollment this spring. 

The men who attended the illustrated lecture on 
Northfield given by Roger B. Hull, Yale '05, Thurs- 
day. May 14th. no doubt received a better Idea of 
the real value derived from a few days spent at such 
a Conference. 

In order for our college to grow and draw the bet- 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ter men we must let them know that such a college 
as M. A. C. exists. We must advertise. Where 
can we advertise more advantageously than where a 
college gathering of over a thousand men have their 
rendezvous? Northfield has won the hearts of thous- 
ands of the best type of college men. It is perhaps 
not saying too much to state the fact that delegations 
from more different colleges, and preparatory schools 
meet together at Northfield than at any other place in 
the country. 

This year our committee is working to get a large 
number of prospective freshmen to attend the Confer- 
ence. Whether they will enter our college In the 
fall may hinge on the men there representing this col- 
lege. It is planned to have our delegation there in 
full force for the first four days in July. The Con- 
ference lasts for ten days and although the committee 
would greatly desire to have men stay the whole time, 
it has seemed fit to limit the time to four days in 
order that all may be there together. 

The expense is very reasonable and is reduced to 
minimum when taking into consideration the indivi !- 
ual gain derived. Mr. Newton Shultis* generosity 
has enabled us to establish a "Northfield Fund" of 
$200. Any man may borrow from this fund without 
interest, providing he refund the money within one 
year's time after graduation. 

Men! lets consider what a good sized delegation 
from M. A. C. would involve. Let's not lose this 
grand opportunity of developing ourselves and doing 
for the college what we could do i n no other way. 

Df p&rtmcirtT fio-fcts. 



AGRICULTURE. 

There has been a movement on foot among the 
farmers and breeders of the state to form an Asso- 
ciation for the purpose of forwarding the improvement 
and breeding of pure blooded live stock. 

Through the energies of Mr. Forristall this plan for 
an Association has been brought to a head and there 
will be a meeting for discussion and organization at 
Carnegie Hall, Northampton, on Saturday, May 23rd. 
This Association is to be founded on broad and intel- 
ligent lines and if successful will be of great value to 
the farmers and of direct financial benefit to the 
breeders of horses, cattle, sheep, etc. 



The program for the meeting on Saturday will be of 
especial interest. The main features will be •« Se- 
lection in the improvement of pure blooded stock and 
how secured by co-operation" by Professor Wm. H. 
Caldwell. Secretary and Treasurer of American 
Guernsey Cattle Club. Professor Caldwell will alsc 
speak of work done along these co-operative lines in 
Illinois, Wisconsin and Michigan. ' 'Health and other 
influences in the breeding of pure live stock." by Dr 
James F. Paige. J. Lewis Ellsworth. Secretary 
State Board of Agriculture, will also speak. 
MILITARY. 
The Military Department will soon receive from 
the U. S. War Department 5 rifles of 22 calibre. 
20.000 rounds of ball cartridges for the same and two 
small targets. These rifles will be used for shon 
range practice. 

DIVISION OF HORTICULTURE. 
Thz main enterprise now-a-days in the Division of 
Horticulture Is the new greenhouse and floriculture 
i?boratory. Professor White is working night an: 
day on plans and estimates and is in almost daily 
communication with architects and contractors. 

The horticultural seniors made a trip in a body 
last week to the Bay Road Fruit Farm where Pro- 
fessors Waugh and Sears proudly exhibited the latest 
methods in tree planting. The exercise proved an 
excellent illustration of many of the points taught in 
the classroom. 

A group of gardens has been laid out near Wilder 
Hall, which will be planted with various collections ol 
flowers and vegetables. These will be used primarily 
for Professor Waugh's course in the Summer School. 
but are expected to be available for the regular 
students next fall. 

SUMMER SCHOOL. 
Dr. T. N. Carver of Harvard has been engaged tc 
give the course this summer in agricultural econo 
mics. This will be in general a descriptive course. 
covering the broad economic relationships of the agri 
cultural industry. It will discuss the place oi 
agriculture in the national economy, give some survey 
of American agricultural development, some special 
characteristics of the agricultural industry, the relation 
of city and country Industries, will outline the specia. 



problems of rural economy, will discuss the organiza- 
tion of rural interests and will open up the question of 
rural New England. 

Dr. Carver is said to be an exceptionally able man 
and his course here is expected to be a drawing card. 
He has heen connected with Harvard for several 
years where he has maintained a course in agricul- 
tural economics. He has written several books on 
economic subjects, and is considered by his fellow 
students to be one of the clearest headed, vigorous 
and forceful writers in the economic field to-day. 
He has always had an interest in agriculture, as he 
was brought up on a farm, and during recent years 
has given his principal attention to the economics of 
agriculture. He has made several extensive trips in 
the west and in New England on horseback studying 
economic conditions amongst the farmers. Recently 
he has spent a year in Europe investigating the farm 
problem under European conditions. His course 
at the Summer School at the College will be 
given the first half of August during that period 
especially devoted tc preachers and teachers, it will 
offer a notable opportunity for all persons who wish to 
get a broad and yet thorough knowledge of one of 
the most significant fields of American economics. 

Dean Hurd of the University of Maine will give a 
course on " The Agricultural Industry in New Eng- 
land," which will also be something out of the ordin- 
ary. These two courses come August 3-14; and as 
Professor White's course in forestry comes at the 
same time, it would seem that some of our regular 
four-year men might find it worth their while to put in 
two weeks at the College just then. 

The arrangements for two week's summer work for 
country pastors go on swimmingly, though the scheme 
did not get the expected financial support outside. 
Rev. W. L. Anderson of Amherst is co-operating 
with President Butterfield and Professor Waugh to 
carry out the original plans. 

Bird study will be one of the features at the Sum- 
mer School at the College this summer. State 
Ornithologist Forbush gave a week's work last year 
and will be back for a few lectures this summer. 
The main body of the work, however, has been 
assigned to Professor W. H. Dudley of the Wiscon- 
sin State Normal School. Professor Dudley is a 



noted and popular Chautauqua lecturer throughout the 
West. He has also taught in the Connecticut Agri- 
cultural College and in Harvard and has made many 
friends in the East. He will be accompanied by 
Mrs. Dudley, who is also an expert in bird work, 
especially in the imitation of bird songs. It is ex- 
pected that this feature of the Summer School at the 
college will be both popular and valuable. 

Registrations for the Summer School are coming 
in steadily and the session of 1908 promises to be as 
successful as the one of 1907. The work is to be 
much broader this summer, and is not confined to 
teachers. In fact anyone who wants to g»M a popular 
knowledge of modern agriculture can get it in the 
Summer School. One of the editors of the Ladies' 
Home Journal writes to Professor Waugh : "I have 
been advising my correspondents to try Massachusetts 
Agricultural College." 



Alu 



mm. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Sophomore Senior promenade will be held 
June 16, 1908. For particulars and invitations 
address Harold Allen, Amherst. 

Notice 1898. The class will have a reunion 
this Commencement. Every member of the Class 
is expected to be back. 

Notice 1903. -The Class will hold its Quinten- 
nial Reunion, during Commencement week. 
Members of the class intending to attend are 
requested to notify Mr. G. D. Jones of North 
Amherst. 

Notice 1905.— The class will hold its Trien 
nial Reunion at Amherst, June 16, 1908. 

P. F. Williams, Sec. 

Notice 1907. *o7 men expecting to be at 
Commencement, please notify the class secretary 

as soon as possible. 

J. H. Chapman, Sec. 

At 9-30 a. m.. Tuesday. June 16. Alumn' Day, 
there will be a baseball game between a picked team 
of the Alumni and the Senior class. Professor S. 
Francis Howard is acting as Captain of the Alumni 
team. 









IO 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



1 1 






'83.— E. A. Bishop, who for the past five years 
has been in charge of the Department of Agriculture 
in Hampden Institute, Va.. will shortly sever his con- 
nection with that institution. Mr. Bishop's future 
plans are undecided. 

ex -'85 — Mr. and Mrs. John Dickinson, until re- 
cently of Atlanta, Ga., have sold their place there, 
and will make their home at their residence on 
Lincoln Avenue, Amherst. Mr. Dickinson has for 
a number of years been secretary of the Southern 
Belting Company of Atlanta and Boston. Mr. Dick- 
inson's future duties will be mainly confined to the 
Boston branch of the business. 

'91. Walter A. Brown of Springfield visited 

Amherst last Sunday. 

"92.— Judson L. Field, 294-5th Ave., Chicago. III. 
'92. Dr. Richard P. Lyman of Hartford has re- 
cently accepted an appointment upon a committee of 
five prominent veterinarians representing the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. This committee is to 
visit the veterinary colleges of the United States, and 
study the courses of instruction and the facilities 
which these institutions have for preparing veterinary 
surgeons to take up the work in connection with the 
the U. S. meat inspection force, where 800 veterin- 
arians are annually employed. 

•93._A. Edward Melendy, 208 Fifth Ave., New 
York, with Duplex Metals Co. 

'94. — Dr. T. S. Bacon of Springfield, who has 
been seriously ill for four months has recovered and 
has resumed his practice. 

•94. —Robert F. Pomeroy, Wallingford. Vt. 
'95. — George A. Billings has resigned his position 
as dairy husbandman in the New Jersey Experiment 
Station to accept a position in connection with the 
Farm Management investigations of the Agricultural 
Department at Washington. Mr. Billings was an 
assistant at the Massachusetts Experiment Station for 
several years after his graduation. 

"95. — F. C. Tobey of West Stockbridge has re- 
cently been elected vice-president of the board of 
trade of that town. 

'95. — Professor and Mrs. E. A. White recently 
welcomed to their home a son, Emerson Edward, 
born May 14. 



2 year '95.— E. E. Kingman, Heath, Franklin 
Co. 

'97._Dr. L. L. Chenery, 329 Telfair St., 
Augusta. Ga. Veterinarian in charge of food inspec 
tion. Augusta Board of Health, 

'97. — C.A.Peters, professor of chemistry, University 
of Idaho, has been granted a year's leave of absence 
which he with his family intends to spend in Berlin, 
studying, and possibly teaching. 

'98.— J. S. Eaton, Chief Adjuster, Life and Acci- 
dent and Claim Division, The Travellers Insurance 
Company, Hartford. Conn. 

'01. — Austin Winfield Morrill was married, April 
29, to Miss Florence Hall McCormick of Dallas. 
Texas. Mr. and Mrs. Morrill will be at home after 
May 15 at The Summerlin, Orlando, Fla. 

'03. — H. J. Franklin has accepted an appointment 
to the faculty of the University of Minnesota. Mr. 
Franklin will also be connected with the Experiment 
Station work. 

•04.— A. W. Gilbert has been granted the Fellow- 
ship in Agriculture at Cornell University for next year. 
In addition to the graduate work which he is pursuing 
for a Ph. D. degree, Mr. Gilbert will give courses 
in Plant- breeding at the University during next year. 
He has been recently elected President of the Cor- 
nell section of the American Society of Agronomy 
and the scientific fraternity of Sigma Xi. Address 
Alpha Zeta Lodge, Ithaca. N. Y. 

'04. — Born May 7, to Arthur L. and Sarah Root 
Peck in Manhattan, Kansas, a son, Morton Lee. A. 
L. Peck has received an appointment as an instruc- 
tor in Landscape Gardening in Oregon State College. 
Mr. Peck will go to Oregon in September. 

'05. — G. N. Willis is working in Greenfield for W. 
A. Brown, '91. 

'05. E. W. Newhall of California is visiting In 

the state, and will probably be in Amherst during 
Commencement. 

'06. F. C. Pray, and Walter Dickinson, '07, 

have returned to North Amherst from Hormiguero. 
Cuba, where they have been engaged in the Sugar 
refining business. Mr. Pray was the chemist for the 
Hormiguero Central Co., and Mr. Dickinson was 
assistant chemist. Both expect to return to Cuba 
next season. 



Tell Mother I'll be There ! ! 



Where ? ? 



AT TIIH 



Junior Minstrel Show 



DRI 

Friday evening, May 22, at 8 

Snappy Jokes ! Good Singing ! (iraiul Vaudeville ! 

Special Attraction: 
Mr. W. H. Bi.ake of Boston will give three specialties. 






General Admission 35c. 



Doors open at 7-30. 



Reserved Seats 50c. 



FOR YOUR INSPECTION. 



fefiQC CLW& SH8P 

~<Ahkj* nfckomt- W# or sot * 
Amherst House BLOCK. 







THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE 

DAIRY EnPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSING, MICHKJAN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



short course: men 

I pUcfl buttermakers, cheese-makers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. 0. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 

TAILOR •X<MMC 

II AMITY STKF.HT. - AMHERST 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and ftrtt class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will he 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Tei.kphonk 54-4- 



GOODS FOR MEN 



limiieisi House Basnet Slop - 



Four First Class Barbers 




Open Mondays from 


J A. M. 


to 


8 


r. m. 


Tuesdays ; 


. it 




6 


11 


Wednesdays, ; 


. i . 




8 


11 


Thursdays, " t 


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6 


ii 


Fridays, 


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C. & K. DERBY (Quality dc Luxe) 
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SPORTING GOODS. 

ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMFOETBD D1EBCT 
FROM LONDON, 




JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets. Pillow Cases, 
Blankets. Comfortables and 'Towels. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, B Confectionery and Fruit, 



Ralw's Jim, 

,, M South Street, off Main, NORTHAMPTON. MASS 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 PEH DAT. 

When in " lUmp." stop with us. 
THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 

R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Bate. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 
and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95? Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

( mr FerlUlier Literature is sent Fret- of Chart;.- it v>u MMtlM 
tlif- College Signal 



" For the_ 



Land's Sake 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



IIIE ME-HITIIB CUPIt 



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Tkty enrich the earth 
and those who tilt it. 




Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 

the best resultsin atli 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the Beat 
implements. T h e y 
may cost a trifle more 
hut it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best T e n n i s 
Racket and Ball. Foot 
Ball. Basket Ball, 
KunningShoes.Skates, 
Hockey Sticks. Sweat- 
ers. Jerseys, etc. Our 
...ds have chararter 
imr trademark means something. 

„,1 rot Ml Catalogue It is free to any address. 

WRIGHT * DITSON 

U4 WASHINGTON - I .. §OSTOH 

is WEST vih ST.. NEW voKK 
. ■„„ uso I-K..VIP.N. .. l< I < AMBR.r.r.f. Mass. 




SUPPLIES. 

FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 

'Telephone connections dit«< t t<» our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT- 

B. A. THOBIPtONi 

RMf First National Hank. AMIII.KM 



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Makers to OB, 07, 08 Classes. 



Loiuest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

•JUL' Fourth Av<- , Nkw York. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

•27 Main St., Northampton. 

Manonic lllock, near Depot, Open every day. 

Luucuaa, Confectionery, Cigar* Noted for iu excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 A. M. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOTNTON, 

MAHUFACTCBEB OP 



1'iueapple Lemon and German Tonic, Blrcn Bear and Ginger 
Ala. Fountain* charged to order. 



Kivkk Street. 



NoKTUAMrroM, Mm. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



OUR ICE CREAM SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



POWERS. 
TME TAILOR, 

Has received the latest fabrics for the spring and NMMM 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Latfei 
Garments In a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly clone 

JyP-Military Work a Specialty .^JSk 
Under the Post Office, - - Amhkbst, Mass. 

AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Date. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUSDM 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment, 

l*f .A..O. A.K*t. H.M.JENNUBON. '«>« 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 

M. A. C. '82« 

FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 
Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
" " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

i^SATISFAOTION 0>X7A.Jt.A.*»TSnBE>. B4SF 
H. A. UTLBY, Munmger. 

OFFICB ! 

East Pleasant Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 



AT THH 



COLLEGE STORK. 

The Children are Happy. 
Because their clothee are made on the New Home sewing 
Machine, which fact, assure* them of no "rlpa." Mnttn-i- 
should get one at once as it will do for their children In ye*» 
to come. Dealers Kvery where. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Connecticut Valley street Railway Go. 

AMHMCHBT IHVISMON. 

Cars will leave A inheratand Northampton on tin- hour and 
half hour from «.3» a. m. till I0.;10 p. M. Sundays the first ear 
will leave at *:Mi a. m. 

Main okeick, Ukeenfielu, Mass. 

John A.Taggart, Supt. 

Northampton Omci, 102 Main St. 

C. W. Clapp, Asst. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, li. r . If, 

Don't Walk on your Heels 

To savi your sole. Come to me Tot your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town Ham.. 



Amherst & Sunderland Street Railway Go. 



Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.M p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.: !I0 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 



H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 



Telephone 71-2 Amherrt. 



Central Vermont Railway Go. 

Southern Division. 



CORRBCTKD TO JAN. I, lw»s 

SOUTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for New London ami intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 

Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
*tations at 8.42 a. m., 12.57 p. m., express, ami 
G.27 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. W. HAN LEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



WANTED 

college: men and women 
tu ,ut ,ts ow Salci Agents. Earn enough during the sum 
in. i to paj youi expenses for the next year. Our propo 
tition offers 40% profit No capital required. Write IOI 
full particulars. Catalogue and samples free. 

FRANK W WILLIAMS COMPANY 
1209 W. Taylor St., Chicago, III. 

DENTAL ROOMS, 



1 I'TI.KK's Ul.ocK, 



AM IIKKST, MASH 



E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. S. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' BLOCK, AM IIKKST, MASS. 

> II Hi K 1 1 Ol KB 
9 TO 12 .A.. M. , 1-30 TO ft I». M. 

Ether ami Nitrous Oxiile Gas administered when desired. 



THURBER S 

VARIETY STORE. 



Next to Post Office, 



AMHERST. MASS. 



Bring your pictures to 
us to be framed. 

WE HAVE STARTED A CIRCULATING LIBRARY. 

Have all the latest books of fiction. 



AMHERST CO-OP. 



C. R. ELDER, 



SELLS 



<»<><>]> COAL 



AT RIGHT PRICES. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT Ol^ BUSIIVH^SaS. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. < )ur nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 

OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 

Telephone. 





High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



Arthur E. Dorr. 



L. H. Tourtklotte. 



ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WHOLESALE UEALRKS AND .IOBBKKS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 

Corner North and I'nion Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON. MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 

A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, - - - Northampton. Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 



THE CMS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 



THK LARGEST COLLEGE ENU HAV- 
ING HOl'SK IN THK WORI.I>. 

Works: llth SMttiitkl 
|0 PHILADELPHIA, P». 




J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STABLES 

CHASES. BARN. NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHE RST, MAS S 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 

Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Writ*- for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



J. H.TROTT 

PIPER. STEP * BBS FITTER. 

Ill BEILEI II STOVES III BII6E5. 



Shop 15 i-» North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 

Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Raceive Prompt Attention. 



THE AMHERST 



FURNITUREJIND CARPET STORE. 



A COMPLETE LINK OK GOODS 
SUITED TO THE STUDENTS* WANTS. 

Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



KSTAHL1SHKD 1*51 



EIMER& AMEND, 

205-211 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

IMPORTERS AMU MANUFACTURERS OV 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We handle the hent of 
EVERYTHING NEKDED IN A LABORATORY. 



All goods Strictly Cash and at Loivest Prices. 



EL. D. MARSH, 

10 Phoenix Row, - - Amherst, Mass. 



LET . 



"BILL' 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE. 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 

J. A. TURNER. 

PLEASANT ST., OVER AMHERST BAKERY. 



DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON, MA88. 

Near Smith College. 

American Plan, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan, Rooms with Bath $1.00, $1.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 



HOLYOKE, MASS 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

FINE CAFE OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Banquets 

and Class Dinners. 

GEO. H. BOWKER & CO. 



A FULL LINE OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 






AKHa$f , Aa$$. 



■ 












THE : ■ -<V 

flfoassacbusette 



Bgricultural 

Collcae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFER: 



1. SHORT COURSES as follows: 

(a) A Short Winter Course in Dairt Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School or Agriculture. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2 ^ FOUR YEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior years, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics, Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modern Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3 POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterheld, Amherst, Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SMIL 



VOL. 18 



NO. 16 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNC 3. 1908 






We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town. We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
fact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 







ti. E. MILLET1 , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOIilN, BANJO, WRlflDOlilN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULISTS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 



GO TO .... 



Page's $boe Store 



LARG 



STOCK 



Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 



Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 







fa.a.d. or 



iX 



NO. 16 



IGHAL will be 
i requested to 



Ktra. 



. Pre*, 
lanager. 
s. Pre*, 
■on, Manager. 



lion of the 
■t glory in 
rs he has 

laces that 
ler on the 
r. With 
I he has 
around an 
ie a show 
y ; in the 
rol have 
has more 
with the 
has not 
room too 
field has 
Dlace him 
rofession. 
lat pluck 
r athletic 
e whole- 






. | 







W 


All 


th. 


have 


C 


fact 


ev 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 3. 1908 



NO. 16 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
Student, and I Alumni are requested to contribute. Communication, should be addres*d. Coll«o. S.onal. Amh.mt. Mass. Th. S.onal w.II be 

*., V« "u™ " S di » continu * nce is ord « red »»d »"ears are paid. Subscriber, who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 

notify the Business Manager. * ' M 






B 



R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Notes 

M. F. CEER. 1909, Alumni Notes. 

C. H. WHITE, 1909, Y. M. C. A. Notes 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE. 1 909. Editor-in-Chief. 

O. B. BRIGCS. 1 909, Business Manager. 

E. F. DAMON. 1 9 10. Assistant Business Manager. 



R. N. HALLOWELL. 1911 
S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 



W. R. CLARKE. 1910, Department Notes. 
L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 
H. A. BROOKS. 1910. Special. 



Terma, fl.OO p er ge ar in adc. nce. Single Copies. IOc. Postage outside ul United States and Canada. Vac. extra. 



E> 



i 
i 

4 



Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket-Bail Association, 
Base- Ball Association. 



SIGNAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Prof. S. F. Howard, Sec. Fraternity Conference 

M. W. Thompson. Manager 
H. M. Jennison, Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager- 
College Senate, 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C A. 

Musical Association. 

K. E. Glllett. President. 



JR. Parker. Pres. 
R. D. Lul'. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pre.. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-claw matter. Post Office at AmherM. 



Editorials. 



About this time begin to think about next week. 
Everybody gets busy now whether or not he has been 
loafing these fine days. To be admired is he who 
has kept abreast of the line all the while and is not 
required to undergo a final examination. 



w ■ 



Deue 



I r seems appropriate to publish at this time and 
with this issue the picture of one who for four years 
has been a leader in the athletics of M. A. C. 

[George Robert Cobb came to M. A, C. in the fall of 
1904 from the Amhsrst High School where he played 

[a prominent part in the athletic events of that institu- 
tion. Cobb captained the winning baseball teams of 
his freshman and sophomore years but had already 
made his "M" on the varsity football squad at the 
time of the 1907-'08 class game. He played right 

land left forward respectively on the victorious fresh- 

|man and sophomore basketball teams. He has 

layed quarterback on four "Massachusetts" football 

teams and captained the team of 1907. On the 



diamond he has played nearly every position of the 
infield and with success but finds his chiefest glory in 
the pitcher's box. For the last two years he has 
been captain of the team. 

It Is needless to relate the times and places that 
Cobb has pulled victory out of defeat whether on the 
gridiron, the diamond or basketball floor. With 
instinctive judgment and rapid headwork he has 
directed many a successful play against or around an 
opponent's line ; his superb punting has made a show 
of the feeble kicks of many an adversary ; in the 
pitcher's box his collectedness and control have 
struck out many a batter ; his enthusiasm has more 
than once thrilled and inspired our teams with the 
spirit which knows no defeat. And Cobb has not 
excelled in athletics alone. In the class-room too 
the brain trained to keen activity on the field has 
served him in good stead and promises to place him 
among the foremost followers of his chosen profession. 
To such as he "Massachusetts" owes that pluck 
and determination which characterizes her athletic 
teams. It is the singleness of purpose, the whole- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



heartedness with which Cobb entered into whatever 
he has done that should remain in the memory of 
those who know him. He graduates in June. We 
cannot help feeling that the College sustains a loss 
but trust that others are in line to take up the good 
work and lead our teams through victory and defeat. 
With one mind let us join in wishing Cobb all the 
success that is due him in the sterner game of "life." 



The formation of a stock breeders' association at 
Northampton is but one instance of the movement of 
the agriculturists of the country toward combining 
their interests in a way to secure Individual protec- 
tion from the more highly organized interests sur- 
rounding them and to promote their general welfare. 
Word comes from Washington that President Roose- 
velt will appoint a commission for the purpose of 
making a thorough study of rural social economy im- 
mediately after congress adjourns. Of this commis- 
sion and the work before it the Homestead has the 
following account: — 

The commission will consist of Prof. L'berty H . 
Bailey of Cornell University, probably Prof. A. A. 
Noyes, acting president of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, and Gifford Pinchot, chief fores- 
ter of the United States. It is said that the presi- 
dent has been thinking about this matter since he 
made his speech at the semi-centennial celebration 
of the founding of agricultural colleges in the United 
States at Lansing, Mich., a year ago. His investi- 
gations convinced him that the educational system in 
use has been lacking on the side of industrial training 
for the shop and farm. 

The president declared then that the country must 
develop a system under which each individual citizen 
should be trained so as to be effective individually as 
an economic unit and fit to be organized with his 
fellows, so that he and they could work in efficient 
fashion together. The president holds that there is 
but one person whose welfare is as vital to the welfare 
of the whole country as that of the wage-worker who 
does manual labor, and that is the farmer. In the 
past, the United States during times of crisis has 
had to place a peculiar dependence upon the farming 
population. Investigation shows that in the eastern 
half of our country there has been a shrinkage in 
number of the farming population since the civil war. 



The city population meantime has greatly increased. 
The extension of railroads, the development of 
machinery, and openings for industrial success have 
been responsible for this city increase. 

As an offset to the tendencies against the farm 
there have been various improvements which have 
rendered country life more easy and pleasant. But 
there has been a social as well as an economic falling 
off, and the president wants this condition changed. 
He proposes to give every encouragement to the 
growth in the open farming country of such institu- 
tional and social movements as will meet the 
demands of the best type of farmers. He would like 
to see more libraries, assembly halls, and social 
organizations of all kinds; he wants school buildings 
and teachers to be of the highest type and the country 
church revived. He is anxious that all kinds of 
agencies from rural free delivery to the bicycle and 
telephone should be utilized to the largest extent. 

It is more Important that there should be the best 
kind of life on the farm for the sake of producing the 
best kind of men, than the fostering of agriculture for 
itself alone. The commission to be appointed will be 
asked among other things, to answer the following 
questions : How can the life of a farm family be made 
less solitary, fuller of opportunities, freer from drudg- 
ery, more comfortable, happier and more attractive? 
How can life on a farm be kept on the highest level 
and where it is not already on that level be so improved, 
dignified and brightened as to awaken and keep alive 
the pride and loyalty of the farmer's boys and girls, of 
the farmer's wife and of the farmer himself? How 
can a compelling desire to live on the farm be aroused 
in children who were born on the farm? 

The commission will investigate rural education, 
rural organization, rural communication, the control 
of corporations, land settlements, and labor supply. 
There will be examination of plans to improve the 
express and railroad service, the highways, mails, 
telephone and telegraph. There will be an exhaust- 
ive inquiry into means of improving agricultural 
colleges and farmer's institutes. 

The president and Mr. Pinchot believe there should 
be combinations among the farmers in order that they 
may be able to protect their industry from the highly 
organized interests surrounding them. A combina- 
tion of this kind in Denmark, for instance, has re- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



suited in bringing people back to the land, and has 
enabled the Danish peasant to compete in an extraor- 
dinary fashion not only at home, but in foreign coun- 
tries with ali rivals. 

The various phases of this broad scheme have been 
taken up for many years by the state department of 
agriculture, agricultural colleges, farmers' institutes, 
granges, and the agricultural press, and much has 
been accomplished in the desired direction. That a 
great deal more needs to be done we all realize, and 
farmers generally will welcome the president's com- 
mission scheme as outlined above. 



Erratum — In Alumni Notes of issue of May 20, 
read under 2-year '95, "E. E. Kinsman" for E. E. 
Kingman ; also under '97 read Dr. L. L. Cheney for 
Dr. L. L. Chenery. 



/Athletic Not?S- 

BASEBALL. 

M. A. C, 4; C. A. C, 0. 
The baseball team defeated that of the Connecticut 
Agricultural College at Storrs, May 16, by the score 
of 4 to 0. Score by innings: 

Innings. I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 R. H. E. 

Massachusetts. 3 1 0-4 7 1 

C A. C, 0—0 3 4 

Batteries— Hubbard and French ; Conzelman and Wooden. 

Dartmouth, 6; M. A. C, 4. 
In a somewhat uncertain game Dartmouth won 
from the Massachusetts Agricultural College at Han- 
over, May 23, 6 to 4. Cobb had poor support at 
critical moments, and was hit rather freely. Mitchell 
pitched a steady game, but could not keep the hits 
down. The '• Aggies" first tallied on a single and 
a double in the first inning. In the third inning they 
got two more on a pass, singles by O'Donnell and 
Cobb and an error. Their last run came from 
O'Grady, who singled, stole and got to third on the 
put-out of Warner, scoring when French hit to the 
infield. Dartmouth got two in the second on three 
errors and a single. Two more came in the fourth 
on two singles, a sacrifice and a passed ball. The 
last two runs were made in the sixth on t vo doubles 
and Conroy's single. The score: 





DARTMOUTH. 
















A.B. 


■. 


P.O. 


A. 


«. 


SchildmiUer, r.. 






3 














Mitchell, p.. 






4 





1 


4 


1 


Leonard, c. 






4 





10 


4 





Hobart, 3, 






4 


2 


1 


1 





Eaton, 2. 






2 





2 








Brady. 1, 






4 


3 


7 


1 





Emerson, 1., 






4 


1 


4 








Conroy. s., 
LangdeH, m.. 






4 


2 


1 


1 









2 


1 


1 








Totals. 






















31 


9 


27 


11 


1 




MV..A1 HIT.BTTS. 
















A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


1 


O'Donnell, s., 






4 


2 


1 


1 





Shattuck. 2. 






4 





4 


1 





Cobb. p.. 






4 


2 





4 




Hubbard. 1. 






4 





10 


I 





F. Warner. 1. 






4 


1 


1 


1 





Tilton. 3, 






3 


1 





2 





O'Grady. m.. 






4 


2 








1 


T. Warner, r.. 






3 














French, c, 






2 





8 





1 


Johnson, r.. 






1 














Totals. 






33 


8 


24 


10 


4 


Dartmouth. 


2 





2 


2 








-6 


Massachusetts. 


1 


2 








1 





0-4 


Runs— O'Donneil, 


Shattuck. O'Grady. 


French 


, Hobart 3. Brady 3. 


S»c- 


rt'ce hits— Eaton 2.Schildmlller. 


Stolen bases 


-O'Gra 


iy 2. 


Tiiton. 


Two- 



base hits— Hobart, Brady, Tilton. Cobb. First base on balls-off Mitchell 1 . 
off Cobb I . Left on bases— Dartmouth 5. Massachusetts 4. Struck out — 
by Mitchell 10, by Cobb 9. Batter hit-by Mitchell I. Passed balls- 
French 2. Time— 1 hour. 40 mln. Umpire — Klllourhy. 

Amherst, 2 ; M. A. C, 1. 
From the Republican : 

Amherst played a practice game. May 27, at Am- 
herst with the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
team. The latter borrowed an Amherst battery. 
Several of the "Aggies" were not present, and the 
understanding was that they should borrow a pitcher 
and catcher. Amherst won, 2 to 1. Kirley repre- 
sented them in the box and pitched a first-class game. 
Danahey, the regular Amherst catcher, caught for 
three innings and then was replaced by Henry of last 
year's team. McClure and Taylor were the home 
team's battery. With these two teams a good exhi- 
bition was given. Kirley allowed but three hits, 
while McClure was touched for six. McClure was 
fast in fielding. San Souci figured in a pretty double 
play. Washburn, Kane and Palmer took part in an- 
other double. For the visitors, Cobb played a fast 
second base. The score : 





AMHERST. 












A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


■ . 


Jube. m.. 


4 





1 








Washburn. 3. 


3 








1 





Taylor, c, 


3 





5 


1 





San Souci. 1.. 


2 





3 


1 





McClure, p. 


3 


1 


3 


3 





Palmer. 1. 


3 





9 








Michaels, r.. 


3 





2 








Pennock, s , 


3 


1 


3 


2 





Kane. 2, 


3 


1 


1 


3 






Totals, 



27 



27 



10 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



O'Donnell, s. 
Cobb, 2, 
Hubbard. 1 
Danahey, c, 
Henry, c, 
F. Wairen. L, 
Tilton, 3. 
O'Grady, m., 
T. L. Warner, r., 
Kirley. p.. 



MASSACHUSETTS 










A.B. 


B. 


P.O. 


A. 


B. 


4 


1 


2 


2 


2 


4 





2 


4 





4 


1 


10 








1 














3 





1 


2 





3 


1 


2 








3 


2 


3 


3 





3 





1 





1 


3 


1 


3 








1 











1 



29 6 24 11 4 

10 10 —2 

1 0—1 

Pennock, T.L. Warner. Stolen bases— McClure. Kane 



Totals. 
Amherst, 

Massachusetts. 

Runs— McClure. 
Warner, Tilton, O'Crady. T. L. Warner. First base on balls— Washburn 
SanSouci. Kirley 2. Left on bases— Amherst 3. Massachusetts 3, Struck 
out— Michaels 2. Hubbard. Danahey, Henry. Double plays— Washburn, 
Kane and Palmer ; San Souci and Palmer. Passed balls— Taylor 2, Dan- 
ahey. Time— 1 hour. 20 min. Umpire— KHbourn. 

Univ. of Vermont, 1 ; M, A. C, 0. 

From the Springfield Republican : 

The University of Vermont defeated the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College in the forenoon game at 
Burlington, Saturday, 1 to 0, in a pitchers' battle. 
Vermont's run was scored on a wild throw by Tilton, 
the visitors' third baseman. The score: 



4 5 6 7 





; Cobb and French. 



9 R.H. 
-1 2 

0-0 4 



Innings, 1 2 3 
Vermont. 

Massachusetts. 
Batteries— Hunt and Burrington 

Univ. of Vermont, 5; M. A. C, 1. 
Vermont scored a second victory in the afternoon, 
5 to 1. The visitors were unable to fathom the 
pitching of Collins, and although Hubbard, who was 
in the box for the visitors, did good work, his support 
was poor at critical times. The score : 



Innings. 123456789 R.H. E. 
Vermont, 10000004 —5 53 

Massachusetts. 1 0—1 2 5 
Batteries— Collins and Burrington : Hubbard and French. 

Seniors, 1 1 ; Faculty, 8. 
The annual baseball game between the Faculty 
and the Seniors was won by the latter last Tuesday, 
May 26, in a loosely played game. The Faculty 
started out strong, scoring two runs on hits by Bart- 
lett, Howard and Waugh, and two errors. Then '08 
settled down and scored almost at will during the 
whole game, especially in the fourth, when a few hits 
and errors tallied six. In the sixth, three hits by the 
Faculty and a wild pitch netted two. About this time 
Captain Chase put his second string men on the field 
and the Faculty proceeded to lessen the difference 
between their score and that of the Seniors, but the 
brilliant box work of Pitcher Jennison saved the day 



for 1908. The feature of the game was the fine work 
of all those who had no chances. The line-up of the 
victors: Captain Chase, p., ss. ; Bates, c. ; Ver- 
beck, Anderson, lb.; Barry, Paige, 2b.; Coleman, 
Liang, 3b. ; Jennison, ss., p. ; Parker, Eastman, If., 
Whiting, Wheeler, cf. ; Wellington, Cummings, 
Jones, rf. For the losers: Walker, p.; Bartlett, 
c. ; Howard, lb.; Gribben, 2b. ; Summers, 3b. ; 
Captain Waugh, ss, ; Franklin, l.f. ; Thompson, cf. ; 
Pomeroy, rf, 

M. A. C. 1911,5; Amherst High, 4. 
The Freshman team met the Amherst High team 
on the campus, May 18, in a closely contested game. 
There were many errors made by both sides. The 
Freshmen were loose in the first three innings, giving 
their opponents their onlv runs. The men who played 
best for the teams were Piper and Hill for the Fresh- 
men, and McCarty for the High School. Score by 
innings : 

Innings, 12 3 4 
M. A. C, 1911, 2 
A. H. S.. 2 2 

Batteries, 1911— Hill and Robb: / 
Umpire— O'Donnel 1 . 

Williston Second, 10; 
The Freshmen went down in utter defeat on the 
campus, Wednesday, May 20, at the hands of the 
Williston second team. It was a walkover for the 
visitors, although 1911 continually shifted and substi- 
tuted men in an effort to stop the slaughter. Score 
by innings: 

Innings. 123456789 

Williston Second. 2 12 10 4 0— 10 

Batteries, 1911— Hill, Piper, Coash and Robb: Williston Second— 
Kraetchman and Wrenn. 



5 


6 7 8 


9 


10 


2 








1-5 











0-4 


V. 


H. S.— Spear 


and 


Hepburn 



M. A. C. 191 



INTERCLASS TRACK MEET. 

From the Republican, May 23 : 

The Massachusetts Agricultural College interclass 
track meet yesterday afternoon was won by the 
Freshmen with 44 points. The Juniors were second 
with 38, the Seniors third with 33, and the Sopho- 
mores fourth with 20. Lew proved a star man for 
the Freshmen, winning the 440 yds. dash, tying for 
first place in the 100 yds. dash, second in the 220, 
and third in the running broad jump. Gillette, 1908, 
did well in the high jump, clearing the bar at 5 ft. 
7 1-5 inches. The relay race was won by the Sen- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



iors. This was the first outdoor athletic meet held 
at the College since 1901, and several records were 
broken. The former record for the 100 yds. dash 
was 10 3-5 seconds, and was lowered to 10 2-5 sec- 
onds by Lew, 191 1, in one of the preliminary heats. 
The old record of 29 4-5 seconds for the low hurdles 
was lowered to 29 2-5 seconds by Sawyer, 1908. K. 
E. Gillette, 1908, broke the old mark of 5 ft. 5 1-2 
in. for the high jump, and set the new mark at 5 ft. 
7 1-5 in. Crosby, 1909, put the 16 lb. shot 37 ft. 
7 1-5 in. , beating the old record by two feet. Leon- 
ard threw the discus 102 ft. 3 in., breaking the old 
record of 93 ft. 3 in. The total number of points 
won by each class in yesterday's meet and the Feb- 
ruary indoor meet stand as follows : 

1909,75; 1911,61; 1908,60; 1910,27. This 
gives the Junior class the right to have their numerals 
engraved on the permanent trophy cup. 

The summary of yesterday's meet: 

100 yds. dash— Lew, 191 1, and Hathaway, 1909, 
tied for 1st place ; Brooks, 2d ; time 10 4-5 sec. 

220 yds. dash — Won by Hammond, 1911; Lew, 
1911, 2d; Hyslop, 1908, 3d; time 24 2-5 sec. 

440 yds. dash— Won by Lew, 191 1 ; Hyslop, 1908, 
2d; Noble, 1909,3d; time 57 1-5 sec. 

120 yds. high hurdles— Won by Turner, 1909; 
Young, 1911, 2d; Sawyer, 1908, 3d; time 18 4-5 
sec. 

220 yds. hurdles— Won by Sawyer, 1908 ; Young, 
1911, 2d; Turner, 1909, 3d; time 29 2-5 sec. 

880 yds. run — Won by Daniels, 1911; Barry, 
1908, 2d ; Barrows, 1911, 3d; time 2 min. 22 3-5 
sec. 

One mile run — Won by Daniels, 1911; Barrows, 
1911, 2d; Barry, 1908, 3d; time 5 min. 4 sec. 

Running high jump — Won by Gillette, 1908; 
Turner, 1909, 2d; Daniels, 191 1, 3d; height 5 ft. 
7 1-5 in. 

Running broad jump— Won by Becker, 1911; 
Turner, 1909, 2d; Lew, 1911,3d; distance 19 ft. 
7 in. 

Putting 16 1b. shot — Won by Crosby, 1911; 
Turner, 1911, 2d; Philbrick, 1908,3d; distance 
37 ft. 8 in. 

Pole Vault— Waldron. 1910, and Urban, 1910, 
tied for first place ; Wilson, 1909, 3d : height 8 ft. 
6 in. 



Throwing the discus — Won by Leonard, 1910; 
Schermerhorn, 1910, 2d; Turner, 1909, 3d ; dis- 
tance 102 ft. 2 in. 

Throwing the 16 lb. hammer — Won by Crosby, 
1909; Gillette, 1908, 2d; Turner, 1909, 3d; dis- 
tance 98 ft. 2 in. 

One mile relay race— Won by 1908 (Barry, Cum- 
mings, Hyslop, Gillette); 1909 (Wilson, Cardln, 
Noble, Crossman) 2d; 1910 (Schermerhorn, Turner, 
Prouty, Nielson) 3d. 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The annual Inter-fraternity Tennis tournament has 
begun, with two entries from each fraternity. Hayes 
and Parker represent Kappa Sigma; Noyes and Jen, 
Q. T. V. ; Armstrong and Rockwood, Phi Sigma 
Kappa, and Wilson and Webb, C. S. C. 

The preliminary contests are to be finished by Sat- 
urday night, May 30. and the semi-finals and finals 
the following week probably. An appropriately en- 
graved silver cup will be awarded the champion. 



REPOR1 


' OF BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION 




FOR SEASON OF I907-'o8. 




Expenditures. 




Receipts' 


$ 81.99 


Athletic supplies. 




25.00 


Coach, 






Gate receipts, 


$ 45.45 


159.50 


Guarantees, 


339.00 


2.00 


Medical attendance, 




23.75 


Postage, printing and stationery, 






Subscriptions— S. F. Howard, 


2.00 




Class of 1908, 


67.00 




Class of 1909, 


53.50 




Class of 1910, 


66.00 




Class of 1911, 


80.50 




Management, 


7.10 


5.10 


Telephone and telegraph. 




342.76 


Traveling and hotel expenses, 




10.00 


Referees, 




5.45 


Miscellaneous, 




5.00 


Picture. 





$660.55 



$660.55 
Submitted, 

H. M. Jennison, Manager. 
Approved, 

John N. Summers, Auditor. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Colleg? N°**S- 



E. A. Back, '04, was about college last week. 
R. S. Eddy, '10, entertained his parents for a few 
days last week. 

W. F. Woodard, ex-' 10, was about college during 
the day of inspection and track meet. 

A large number of students are planning to work 
for the college during the coming vacation. 

The College Orchestra rendered several selections 
at "Ladies' Night" observance by the men's club of 
the North Congregational church. 

George R. Cobb, captain of the baseball team, 
will act as captain and manager of the Stafford 
Springs Bi-State team this summer. 

Owing to the inability of the State Forester, Wm. 
E. Rane.to come, the Forestry Course for the Junior 
Class will not be given this semester. 

The final Senior class-bed has been set out. Profit- 
ing apparently by their early spring bed, the present 
display is simple in design and legible. 

Mr. C. E. Rowe is recovering from a severe kick 
received from a horse. Fortunately the injury was 
not severe enough to cause disfigurement of his face. 
Dr. Wheeler of the Rhode Island Experiment Station 
gave an illustrated lecture before the Stockbridge 
Club in Clark Hall, entitled "Lime and Some Lime 
Experiments." 

Dr. H. T. Fernald who has been confined to his 
home on account of illness, has resumed work at the 
Insectary. Mr. Summers has had charge of his 
work during his absence. 

W. E. Geer, '09, has left college for the rest of 
the term and is now working at the horticulture de- 
partment. He will take the Junior examinations in 
the fall, entering as a Senior. 

President Butterfield delivered the commencement 
address at the New Jersey Manual Training and In- 
dustrial School for colored youths at Bordentown, 
Friday, May 29. His subject was " Vocation and 
Education." 

Mr. Wm. M. Thornton, Jr., instructor in chem- 
istry, has handed in his resignation to accept a posi- 
tion as mineralogist by the Virginian Geological 



Survey. The Signal wishes him all success In 
new position. 

On Wednesday, May 27, Memorial Day exerciser 
were held in Chapel. The battalion marched tc 
Chapel escorting the local Grand Army Post. Hon. 
A. E. Roe of Worcester, addressed the assembly, 
speaking well on General Stevens. 

At the assembly period, May 20, President Butter, 
field told about his trip to Washington as one of the 
three Massachusetts delegates called by Presider 
Roosevelt to the conference of governors to consider 
the conservation of the natural resources of the 
nation. 

The Zoological Club is planning to spend a wee< 
after Commencement on the shores of Long Island 
Sound, in the study of marine animals and fishes 
The work will be under the direction of Professor C 
E. Gordon. Material for study next year will be col 
lected and preserved. The club will establish i 
marine biological laboratory. 

This summer the basement of North College w! 
be fitted up into a college store and suite of rooms for 
the students who care for it, a college barber shop 
shower baths and set bowls, and a large"game room.' 
The first floor will be devoted to athletic and Sicna. 
offices. Mr. Wallace has charge of the work 
There will also be hard wood floors laid throughoj' 
the building. 

Prof. Robert W. Neal recently announced the fo, 
lowing speakers who will compete at commencemei: 
for the Burnham prizes in declamation: Herbert,' 
Baker, Selbyville, Del.; Herbert W. Blaney 
Swampscott ; Allyn P. Burseley, West Barnstable 
Irving W. Davis, Lowell; Royal N. Hallowell, Ja 
maica Plain; Harold H. Howe, Springfield. The 
alternates are: Harold B. Drury, Athol, and Irv.' 
C. Gilgore, Schenectady, N. Y. 

The following Juniors will compete for the F " 
oratorical contest prizes at commencement : Osca; 
Christopher Bartlett, Northampton ; George Murra 
Brown, Jr., Cambridge; Myron Francis Geer 
Springfield; Richard Charles Potter, Concord 
Marcus Thomas Smulyan, New York ; Charles Ho* 
ard White, Providence, R. I. The alternates are 
Waldo Darius Barlow, Amherst, and Rockw::: 
Chester Lindblad, North Grafton. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The annual military inspection of the bat- 
talion and rooms was held Friday, May 22, at 
10 a. m., Capt. Harris of the general staff, United 
States regular army, being inspecting officer. The 
battalion first passed in review. This was followed 
by inspection, battalion drill, Butts' manual, parade 
and company drill. Rooms were inspected at 1 1-30. 
Capt. Harris complimented the battalion on their ex- 
cellent drilling, and said that it was a great improve- 
ment over the drill of previous years. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR. 

Y. M. C. A. Speaker, C. Hamilton of 

Phillips Andover Academy. 
Baseball: M. A. C. vs. Holy Cross. 
Boston College vs. M. A. C. at Boston. 
Chapel: Theodore Roosevelt. Speaker, 
Prof. E. A. Grosvenor. 
June 8-13. Week of Final Examinations. 
June 14. Commencement week. 



June 4. 

June 5. 
June 6. 
June 7. 



MINSTREL SHOW. 

On Friday evening, May 22nd, the junior class 
gave a minstrel show in the Armory under the direc- 
tion of Prof. P. H. Kelley of Holyoke. Mr. E. G. 
Bartlett, '07, acting as accompanist. The musical 
numbers were well rendered, and the end men with 
their pointed hits received continual applause. Dur- 
ing the second part of the entertainment. Mr. Blake 
of the Boston Stock Company added much to the pro- 
gram with his dancing and monologues, and Mr. 
Waldron, '10, gave banjo solos. Previous to the 
entertainment and during the intermission the college 
orchestra gave selections. The armory was well 
filled with townspeople, faculty and students, some 
$75 being cleared. This money goes to the 1909 

Index. 

Program. 
Part 1. 
Orchestra 

Grand Opening Overture. Chorus 

End Song, " Here's my Friend," Mr. Alger 

Ballad. •' When the Vesper Bells at Twilight Sweetly Chime." 



Topical Song, Mr. Tilton 

Ballad. "When the Springtime Brings the Roses Jessie 

Dear," Mr. Brandt 

Grand Finale, Mr. Thurston and Chorus 

Part il. 
Olio. 
Overture by Orchestra, and Cornet Solo 
Skirt Dance, 
Banjo Solo, 
Monologue. 
Harrigan, 



End Song, ■« Much Obliged to You." 
Ballad. " If I Had You." 
End Song, " Back to Chicago." 
Ballad. " Won"t You Waltz Home Sweet Home With Me." 

Mr. Allen 



Mr. White 
Mr. Fulton 
Mr. Barlow 
Mr. Adams 



Mr. Blake 

Mr. Waldron 

Mr. Blake 

Soloist, Mr. Brandt 

Messrs Adams. Coash. Hennessy, Alger. Codding. Noyes 

Song (Selection). Mr. Blake 

Grand Finale. 

Song and Drill. " College Days." Mr. Allen and Chorus 



COMMUNICATION. 

Mark's Meadow, Amherst, Mass., 

May 26. 1908. 
Editors of The College Sicnal. 

Gentlemen ; — As a member of the Board of Trustees 
I wish to express, through your columns, the satis- 
faction I have had during the past week In noticing 
the evident enthusiasm with which the work of the 
institution is now being carried on, both by faculty 
and students. College spirit seems to run high and 
this is well. There is evident a growing pride in the 
institution in which we all alike share. The college 
is on the upgrade and a greater future is in store 
for it. 

I was especially pleased at the appearance of the 
battalion during the inspection by Captain Harris, U. 
S. A., Friday morning. Everything went off with 
precision and snap. The condition of the corps 
reflects great credit on the Commandant, Captain 
Martin: The inspecting officer spoke of the organi- 
zation in terms of high praise, noting particularly the 
improvement over the work of previous years. 

I had the privilege also of attending the Junior 
minstrel show the evening of that day and, sitting on 
the front seat, enjoyed every moment of it. The pro- 
gram was in excellent taste and well carried out, 
while the "grinds" were not so severe as to be dis- 
agreeable. The chorus singing I thought was remark- 
ably fine, and so was the work of the orchestra. 

The new rifle range is good ; but who will give us a 
suitable forest reserve of 1000 acres or more within 
reasonably easy access to the college ? 
Yours truly, 

M. F. Dickinson. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 




FINAL EXAMINATIONS. 







Monday, 


June 8. 




8-15 A. M. 


Calculus 


Horticulture 


French 


1-30 p. m. 


Geology 


Agriculture 


Botany 




Tuesday. 


June 9. 




8-15 A. M. 


Chemistry 


English 


Trigonometry 


1-30 p. m. 


Horticulture 


Chemistry 


History 




Wednesday 


. June 10. 




8-15 A. M. 


Agriculture 


Surveying 


Geometry 


1-30 p. m. 


Entomology 


French 
German 


Physiology 




Thursday, 


June 11. 




8-15 A. M. 


Zoology 




Chemistry 


1-30 p. m. 


Botany 




German 




Friday, 


June 12. 




8-15 A. M. 


Landscape Gardening 






Special Chemistry 






1-30 p. m. 


Military 








ANNUAL BEE COURSE 


• 


Schedule of 2d week, June 4-10: 






8-15. 


9-15. 


10-15—12-15. 


Wednesday. Paige. 


Brooks. 


Burton Gates. 


Thursday. 


Paige. 


Brooks. 


Burton Gates. 


Friday. 


Paige. 


Paige. 


Burton Gates. 


Saturday. 


Excursion or Special Assignment. 


Monday. 


Stone. 


Fernald. 


Burton Gates. 


Tuesday. 


Stone. 

•« 


Paige. 


Burton Gates. 



STOCK BREEDERS ORGANIZE. 

An enthusiastic meeting of the leading live stock 
breeders of the Connecticut valley at Northampton 
last Saturday resulted in organizing the Connecticut 
Valley Live Stock Association. The meeting was 
largely the result of suggestions by E. H. Forristall, 
farm superintendent of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, 0. C. Burt of Easthampton, E. P. Bartlett 
of Pelham and George E. Taylor of Shelburne. 

After appointing a committee on organization Prof. 
William H. Caldwell, secretary of the American 
Guernsey cattle club, spoke on the influence of 
breeding and selection In the improvement of live 
stock, and how secured through co-operation, and 
explained the method of getting better cows. 

Dr. James B. Paige of the agricultural college 
showed the benefits which would accrue to the farmers 
of Massachusetts through the organization of a live 
stock association. He pointed out the importance of 
the live stock products to Massachusetts, which are 
$22,500,000 of a total annual product of $60,000,000. 



He spoke particularly of the opportunities for profit in 
raising and breeding horses, particularly Morg?ns, 
draft and coach horses. Charles Brown, an Illinois 
farmer for 22 years, who has recently settled in Mas- 
sachusetts, spoke of the methods followed in breed- 
ing horses in that state. 

A committee on organization submitted articles of 
association, which were adopted. A canvass was 
made of those present and 35 joined as charter mem- 
bers. The officers elected were president, George E. 
Taylor, M. A. C. '92, of Shelburne; vice-president, 
Leslie R. Smith of Hadley ; secretary and treasurer, 
O. C. Burt of Easthampton; executive committee, 
Charles Brown of Greenfield, Prof. Rufus W. Stim- 
son of Northampton and E. P. Bartlett of Pelham. 



AGRICULTURAL HIGH SCHOOL TO THE 

FRONT. 

Friday, May 22, was an eventful day at Peters- 
ham, when New England's first agricultural high 
school was dedicated. Among the distinguished per- 
sons present to aid In the exercises were President 
Eliot of Harvard, President Carroll D. Wright of 
Clark University, Worcester, President Butterfield of 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, and G. H. Mar- 
tin, secretary of the state board of education. The 
new building is situated a short distance out of town 
and has a commanding view. Edwin H. Scott, M. 
A. C, '06, is principal and is conducting it along 
distinctly agricultural lines. 

The Association meeting held in the chapel on 
Thursday, the 28th, was led by Dr. Ora Samuel 
Gray. In his address Mr. Gray emphasized the im- 
portance of living an upright life for three days, 
namely, yesterday, today and tomorrow. If a man 
lives a clean, straightforward life during these days, 
he need have no fear for the future. Jesus Christ is 
ever ready to help a man to lead such a life. In 
closing his talk, Mr. Gray told something of his home 
life. The address was interesting and inspiring 
throughout, and those who attended felt their time 
was well spent. 

The Bible Study committee are now busily en- 



gaged in the spring canvass for enrollment. Chair- 
man G. M. Brown, with the assistance of the Bible 
Study committee, has arranged a strong series of 
courses for the ensuing year. Men who are thinking 
of taking the courses would help the committee ma- 
terially by deciding the course they wish to pursue 
before being approached. 

New men are handing in their names signifying 
their intention of attending the Northfield conference 
this year. Mr. Roger B. Hull, Yale '05, who gave 
the illustrated lecture on Northfield a few weeks ago, 
will spend a couple of days here this week and aid 
the committee in increasing our delegation. The 
prospects now are that the M. A. C. delegation will 
be as large as some of those from the latger colleges. 



D{p&rtm*rvf ftlotts. 

HORTICULTURE. 

Professor Waugh lectured on fruit growing before 
Belchertown grange, May 19. 

At a recent meeting of trustees and others extended 
consideration was given to the future development of 
the College Campus and grounds. Professor Waugh 
of the landscape gardening department made a full re- 
port on the subject. 

One ot the photographs entitled ' ' Women Must 
Wait " shown by Professor Waugh at the recent 
photograph salon in Wilder Hall has just been awarded 
first prize tor artistic merit in the Postal Photographic 
Club. 

BOTANY. 

Dr. Stone has recently been developing several 
interesting devices. One is an arrangement for sow- 
ing fine seed, which consists of a chisel-edge, down 
which seed drops into the soil and is covered by the 
edge. Another recent development is a formalin drip 
apparatus to go with the Planet Jr. onion sower. This 
attachment, which is for the purpose of treating onion 
seed for smut, allows a dripping of formalin on the 
seeds -nd in the drills. The formalin kills the smut 
spores on the seed and in the surrounding earth, thus 
effectually preventing the disease. 

The department is also working on one or two 
spraying devices for special crops and a new type of 
soil sterilizer. Some trials have been made during 
the past week of a new machine, which is the first 



of its kind that has ever been devised. It is com- 
posed of a flexible shaft connecting with wood-cutting 
machinery, and run by a motor for the purpose of 
cleaning out trees. 

Dr. Stone has also perfected a practical method of 
preventing Injury to shade trees from escaping, illu- 
minating gas in the soil. The amount of gas unac- 
counted for in Massachusetts in 1 905 was 622,304 ,044 
cubic feet or about ICty of the amount produced, and 
of this unaccounted for gas, a large percent escapes 
to the soil, through leakage. This leakage causes 
the Injury and death of a considerable number of trees 
annually. By Dr. Stone's method it will be possible 
to run gas mains through avenues lined with shade 
trees, without any injury to the trees. Any leakage 
of gas will be easily detected and taken care of by his 
device. 

EAST EXPERIMENT STATION. 

VALUABLE INFORMATION FREE. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 
has recently issued two bulletins which are likely to be 
of interest to many. One of these gives information 
which should prove of value to people who keep hens 
or who propose to keep hens. The other gives the 
latest and best methods of protecting crops from 
injury by disease and insects. 

The first of these, Bulletin No. 122, Poultry 
Keeping for Egg Production, is a brief guide to poultry 
keeping for eggs. It discusses :— houses for growing 
birds and for laying stock, the question of breed, in- 
cubation and brooding, and the general management 
and feeding both of chickens and laying stock. It 
summarises the results of experiments on the follow- 
ing points : — use of condition powder, clover rowen 
vs. cabbages, influence of the cock on egg production, 
morning vs. evening mash, wide vs. narrow rations 
or corn vs. wheat, buckwheat vs. corn and effect of 
fibre in the ration. 

The second publication, Bulletin No. 123, Fungi- 
cides, Insecticides and Spraying Directions, gives 
formulas for the preparation of fungicides and insecti- 
cides with directions for preventing and controlling 
fungous diseases and insects. Serious injury from 
these causes is now so common that the plain direc- 
tions given in this bulletin should prove of much value. 
This bulletin discusses not only the common crops of 
the field and garden, but shade trees as well. It in- 



10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



ii 






eludes also a brief article on the methods to be 
adopted for the destruction of weeds in mowings, cul- 
tivated fields, tennis courts and walks. 

WEST EXPERIMENT STATION. 

DIVISION OF FERTILIZERS. 

The collection of official samples of the fertilizers 
of Massachusetts will be completed this week. About 
570 samples have been collected to date. The com- 
pletion of the analysis of these fertilizers will engage 
the attention of three chemists during the summer 
months. Aside from the samples collected by the 
official sampler of the station, there have been 138 
samples of fertilizers, refuse byproducts, soils, etc., 
which have been forwarded by private farmers for 
analysis. These materials have nearly all been 
analyzed and results reported to the sender. 
ENGLISH. 

Professor Neal has received notice from the Yale 
Graduate School that he has been recommended for 
the degree A. M. in recognition of his study there 
and the preparation of a required thesis recently sub- 
mitted by him. He now holds the master's degree 
from the University of Kansas and Harvard Univer- 
sity. 

It is understood that several upper classmen will be 
employed as theme-readers or assistants in this de- 
partment next year. 



Al 



umni. 



NOTICE ALUMNI. 

The Sophomore-Senior promenade will be held 
June 16, 1908. For particulars and invitations 
address Harold Allen, Amherst. 

Notice 1898. — The class will have a reunion 
this Commencement. Every member of the Class 
is expected to be back. 

Notice 1903. — The Class will hold its Quinten- 
nial Reunion, during Commencement week. 
Members of the class intending to attend are 
requested to notify Mr. G. D. Jones of North 
Amherst. 

Notice 1905. — The class will hold its Trien- 
nial Reunion at Amherst, June 16, 1908. 

P. F. Williams, Sec. 

Notice 1907.— 'o7 men expecting to be at 



Commencement, please notify the class secretary 
as soon as possible. 

J. H. Chapman, Sec. 

75. — J. F. Barrett has changed his address to 
60 Trinity Place, New York. Mr. Barrett is con- 
nected with the Frederick Ludlam Co., Fertilizers 
and Chemists. 

75. — E. B. Barrett of Chicago was recently visit- 
ing college and seemed very much pleased with the 
progress of the college. 

'82. — President Winthrop Ellsworth Stone, of 
Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind., has confirmed 
the report that his wife has withdrawn from the world, 
including her husband and family, to pursue a mystic 
teaching, supposed to be imported from India. He 
and his two sons are heartbroken and would eagerly 
welcome her back but are unable to reach her. The 
circumstances were laid by President Stone before 
the board of trustees of the university with his resig- 
nation, but the board has voted unanimously to retain 
him in the official position he has held with conspicu- 
ous success since 1 900. 

Three years ago there was organized in Lafayette 
a class in so-called yoga philosophy. Many women 
and some men in the college town joined the class, 
which became a fad with certain highly educated 
people. It was taught that the complete power of the 
yoga involved "withdrawal" or separation from kin- 
dred and friends. The last heard from President 
Stone's wife was from Germany. 

President Stone was born in Chesterfield, N. H., 
June 12, 1862, and removed to Amherst in 1874. 
He entered the Massachusetts Agricultural College 
in 1878, graduating in 1882. For two years he was 
engaged in experiment work at a private station in 
Mountainville, N. Y., and then returned to Amherst 
as assistant to Dr. Goessmann of the Experiment 
Station. In 1886 he went abroad and studied for two 
years at Gottingen. On his return he became a pro- 
fessor in a university at Knoxville, Tenn., and was in 
1890 called to Purdue as professor of chemistry. In 
1900 he became president. President Stone met 
his wife while he was studying in Gottingen, but they 
were married in this country while he was at Knox- 
ville. Mr. Stone's father, F. L. Stone, lives in Am- 
herst. The wife of President Stone is, however, not 
well known here. 



'83.— The class of '83 will hold its 25th reunion 
the coming Commencement. The headquarters of 
the class will be at the Chemical Laboratory of the 
Experiment Station. It is probable that the annual 
banquet will be held on Tuesday evening at Marks 
Meadow. This is made possible through the courtesy 
of one of the trustees, M. F. Dickinson, Esq. The 
class graduated with ten men all of whom are living. 

LIST AND OCCUPATION. 

E. A. Bishop. Dept. of Agriculture, Hampton Insti- 
tute, Va. 
S. C. Bagley, Manufacturer, Boston, Mass. 
D. H. Braune, Planter, Brazil. 
A. A. Hevia, Broker, New York City 
S. M. Holman, Real Estate, Attleboro, Mass. 
J. B. Lindsey, Chemist, Massachusetts Experiment 

Station, Amherst. 
D. 0. Nourse, Professor of Animal Husbandry, 

Clemson College. S. C. 
C. W. Minot, Gypsy Moth Commission, Boston, 

Mass. 
C. H. Preston, Farmer, Hathorne, Mass. 
H. J. Wheeler, Director of R. I. Experiment 

Station, Kingston, R. I. 
The class rejoices in the growth and development 



of the college, and will, 1 am sure, heartily endorse the 
untiring labors of President Butterfield and his ear- 
nest efforts to make M. A. C. stand In the very front 
rank of the agricultural colleges of the country. 

J. B. Lindsey. 

'86.- A. B. Mackintosh, II Central St., Salem. 
Mr. Mackintosh is acting superintendent of Salem 
Fraternity, an institution for boys. 

'95. —Prof. E. A. White visited greenhouses in 
New York and Philadelphia last week on the Invi- 
tation of greenhouse constructors, and with the view 
of obtaining ideas for the new greenhouse here. 

'02.— Born, in Ashfield, Mass., April 17, 1908, a 
daughter, Marcia Grover, to F. R. and L. G. Church. 

'04. — E. A. Back of Orlando, Fla., visited college 
lately. 

05. H. L. Barnes will sever connections with 

the Hampton Institute, where he is the Horticulturist, 
June 1. His address for the present will be White 
Plains, N. Y. 

Ex-'07. — Mr. George Franklin Smith of Barre 
was married to Miss Elsie Emma Hawes, also of 
Barre, on May 5. 



READY 
FOR YOUR INSPECTION. 



'■AUkjs Welcome-bty or *ot 
Amuekbt House Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



the: 
DAIRY EHPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSING, MICHIGAN 

FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



short course: men 

I place buttermakers, cheesemakcrs, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



It's Your Next at the 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'5 

TAIM)W 8STOW1JJ 
II AMITY STREET, - AMHERST 

Im|K>rted and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 



GOODS FOR MEN 





f 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 


7 A. M. 


to 8 l\ M. 


Tuesdays ; 


7 " 


6 " 


Wednesdays, ; 


f " 


8 " 


Thursdays, 9 


M 


6 " 


Fridays, j 


r " 


8 " 


Saturdays, 7 


M 


11 " 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 




C. & K. DERBY (Quality de Luxe) 
REISER CRAVATS, 

SPORTING GOODS. 



ENGLISH AND SCOTCH WOOLENS 

CONFINED STYLES, IMPORTED DIRECT 
FROM LONDON. 



CAMPION, 

TAILOR AND HABERDASHER, 
AMHERST, MASS. 



Rabar's 3nn, 

Old South Street, oil Main, . NORTHAMPTON, MASS. 

Modern Improvements, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Grounds, Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

HATES, $2.00 FEB DAT. 

When in " Hamp." stop with us. 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Hase. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

t )ur Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE HORTulR COmPBHY. 



34-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. T hey 
may cost a trifle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not nave 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Hall, Foot 
Hall, Hasket Hall, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 

_ goods have character 

—our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

WRIGHT <& DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

,8 WEST 30TH ST., NKW VOKK 

Chicago Providkm k, K. I. Cambridge. Mass. 




44 



For the 



Land's Sake" 



USE 



BOWKER'S 
FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 



SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 
UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

IS. A. THOAffPAO*?, 

Hear First National B.nk, AMHERST 




Caps and Gotons 

Makers to 06, '07, '08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

262 Fourth Avp , Nkw York. 



r 








THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARDS LUNCH, 

27 Main St., Northampton. 

Masonic IMock, nenr Depot, Open every <lay. 

Lunelle*, Conrectionery, CiKars. Noted for its excellent 

Oyster Stew and Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 A. u. to 4 A. M. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAMUFACTURKK OF 

SODA WATERS, 

Pineapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. Fountain* charged to order. 

Kivkk Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



Henry Adams & Co. 

THE OLD CORNER DRUG STORE. 



POWERS, 
THE TAILOR, 

Has received the latest fabrics for tin- aprteg anil MHMMf 
trade of '07 in Gentlemen's Garments. Also does Ladies' 
Garments in a satisfactory manner. 

Cleaning, Altering, Repairing 

and Pressing promptly done. 

Kjp-Mllitary Work a Specialty..^ 
Under the Post Office, - - Amherst, Mass. 



OUR ICE GREAfA SODA 



Is Par Excellence. 



TRY OUR 



BANANA SPLITS. 



M. B. KINGMAN, 



M. A. C. '82, 



FLORIST, 

Store, 11 Amity St., Amherst, Mass. 
Cut Flowers always on hand. 

Telephone or call. 



AMHERST HOUSE. 

Everything New and Up- to- Dak. 



Special Attention given to Athletic Teams, Frater- 
nity and Alumni Banquets. 

BEST SERVICES AT REASONABLE PRICES. 

D. H. KENDRICK, Proprietor. 



AMHERST STEAM LAUNDRY 

and Carpet Renovating Establishment, 



Get Sample Rates for Washing. 

Work taken Monday delivered Thursday. 
•• " Thursday delivered Saturday. 

{^IcSATISFAOTION OUARANTBBD. t^ 

H. A. UTLKY, Manager. 

OFFICE : 

East E'leasa.ia.t Street. 



Students' Supplies, 

Candies, Tonics, 

Post-Cards and Photos of M. A. C. 

AT THE 

COlvLEGE STORE}. 

The Children are Happy. 

Because their clothes are made on tlie Nkw Home Sewini; 
Machine, which fact, assure* them of no "rips." Mothers 
should tfet one at once as it will do for their children in yeare 
to come. Dealers Everywhere. 




AMHERST ItiriSlON. 

Cars will leave Amherst and Northampton on the hour mul 
half hour f roui 6.30 a. m. till IOJ0r.ll. Sunday » the lir.-t car 
will leave at ».:«) a.m. 

Main OmCB, Ukkknmki.u, Mahn. 

John A. TaKKitrt, Nupt. 

Northampton oimi i, 109 Main .St. 

C. W. Clapp, Aast. Supt. Telephone, Northampton, ISMS, 



Don't Walk on your Heels 

To skvc your sole. Come to me for your 

Custom-made Boots and Shoes, 

Repairing a specialty. 

CHARLES DORAY, 

Opposite Town HAUL 




1& 





tRai 




Cars leave Amherst for Holyoke at 22 and 52 
minutes past each hour until 9.52 p. m., and Holyoke 
for Amherst on the hour and half hour until 9.30 p.m. 

Special Cars at reasonable rates. 

H. M. ALDRICH. Supt. 
Telephone 71-2 Amherst. 

Central Vermont Railway Co. 

Southern Division. 

< oRRECTED TO JAN. 1, 190H. 



WANTED 

college: men and women 

to act as <»ur S.tles Agents. I. am tOOHffc during the sum 

int-i to pay your expenses foi the Deal year. Ourpropo 
aition offers 40% profit No capital required. Write i«>i 

full particulars. Catalogue IM samples tree. 

FRANK W. WILLIAMS COMPANY 

1209 VV. Taylor St., Chicago, 111. 

O. SI. OATKS, 1 >.1>.5S. 

DENTAii ROOMS, 

( ITI.KK'S lll.OCK. AMHERST, MASS 

E. B. DICKINSON, D. D. B. 
DENTAL ROOMS. 

WILLIAMS' III.OCK, ... AMHERST, MASS. 

OFFICE HOUKfl: 

9 TO 18 -A.. M., 1-30 TO B JP. lO.. 

Kther and Nitrous Oxide Gaa administered when desired. 

TH U RQER'S 

VARIETY STORE. 



SOUTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for New London and intermedi- 
ate stations, connecting at Palmer for Springfield. 
Worcester and Boston at 8.42 a. m., 12.15 p. m., 
express, and 5.43 p. m. The 5.43 p. m. connects 
at New London for New York via Norwich Line 
Steamers. 

NORTH BOUND. 
Leave Amherst for Brattleboro and intermediate 
stations at 8.42 a.m., 12.57 p.m., express, and 
C.27 p. M. 

Week days only. 
Subject to change without notice. 

J. VV. HAN LEY, 
General Passenger Agent, 

St. Albans, Vt. 



Next to Post oiiice, 


AMHERST. MASS. 


Daring the Month of Jane 

UK Will. SELL (ilk 


$1.25 Shirts for 
$1.00 Shirts for ■ 


- 75c. 

- 50c. 


AT THE 





AMHERST CO-OP. 

C. R. ELDER, 

SELLS 

GOOD COAL 

AT RIGHT PRICES. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



GOING OUT OF* I tl :MI :%' ■£»«»«. 

Owing to the adoption of a new policy by the 
Trustees of the College, we are gradually going out 
of business. Our nursery stock is being reduced to 
a minimum, and students and graduates of M. A. C. 
will get the benefits of this on nursery orders this 



spring. 



OF HORTICULTURE, I. A. C. 



Telephone. 



Arthur E. Dorr. L. H. Tourtrlottk. 

ARTHUR E. DORR & CO., 

WIIULKSALK DEALERS AND JOBBERS IN 

POULTRY AND GAME, 

BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, AND VEAL. 

We cordially invite an inspection of our Coolers and 

Freezers. 



Corner North and Union Sts., Basement 3 Union St., 

BOSTON. 

TBE CHAS. H. ELLIOTT CO., 




PHOTOGRAPHER, 

High Grade Work. 
A Specialty of College Classes. 



102 Main St., 



NORTHAMPTON, MASS 



PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Society, Class and Group Work a Specialty. 




THK I.AItr.RST COI.LKGE KNGRAV- 
ING HOU8K IN THK WORLD. 



Works: 17th Street&LetiigtiAve. 
O PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commencement Invitations 

and Class Day Programs 



Class and Fraternity Inserts for Annuals. 

Class and Fraternity Stationery, Menus. 

Class Pins and Medals, 

(Write for Catalogue). 

Makers of Superior Half-Tones. 

Engravers by merit to Massachusetts Agricultural College. 



A. J. SCHILLARE, 

142 Main Street, • • • Northampton, Mass. 

Tel. 332-2. 

J. L. DANA, 

NORTH PLEASANT ST. STARLES 

CHASES, BARN, NEAR EXPRESS OFFICE. 
Telephone Connection, AEHERST, MASS 



j. H/rROTT 



PL0NBEII. STEBW1 & GAS FITTER. 

m DEILEI II STOVES BID IINGES. 



Shop 151-2 North Pleasant St. 



Telephone 36-12. 



M. B. MAGRATH & SON 



Passenger and Baggage Transfer. 

Orders Left at Amherst House Will Receive Prompt Attention. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



THE AMHERST 



FURN1TURE>ND CARPET STORE. 



A COMI'MCTK LINK OK (JOOOS 
SlITKD TO THK STUDENTS' WANTS. 



Bedsteads, Mattresses, Pillows, Study Desks and 

Chairs, Lounges, Window Shades, Draperies, 

Carpets, Rugs, etc., etc. 



All gootls Strictly Cash and at Lowest Prices. 



1. D. MARSH, 



10 Phoenix Row, 



Amhkrst, Mass. 



LET 



"BILL 



PRESS FOR YOU. 

Cleanig, Pressing and Repairing at Reasonable Rates. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO ALL 

M. A. C. TRADE 

15 Pairs of Pants Pressed for $1.50. 



J. A. TURNER. 
PLEASANT ST.. OVER AMHERST BAKERY 



CHARLES E. EWELL 



A FULL LINK OF 



Stationery, Blank Books, Etc. 



All the Magazines. Daily and Sunday Papers. 



KSTAId.ISHK.lt 1851. 



EIMER& AMEND, 

206-21 1 Third Ave., cor. 18th Street, 
SEW YORK. 

IMI'UKTKKH ami MAM't A< TI'UKKB OK 

C. P. Chemicals and Reagents, 
Chemical, Physical and Scientific Apparatus, 

ASSAY GOODS. 



We liniKlle tlic (MM Of 
EVERYTHING NEEDED IN A LABORATORY. 

DRAPER HOTEL, 

NORTHAMPTON. MASS 

Near Smith College. 

American Pima, $3.00 to $4.00. 

European Plan. Rooms with Hath $1. 00, 81.50 and 
$2.00 per day. 

Special Rates to College Men. 



HOTEL HAMILTON, 

BOLYOO, mass 

Famous for its popular priced Sunday dinners with 

music. 

KINK CAFE OPKN UNTIL MIDNIGHT. 

A Specialty made of Iianquets 
and Class Dinners. 

OIO. IL HOWKER A CO. 



CAKKHttR & A0MH0US*, 



AttHast , Mass. 



f ' 



-1>=;THE*. 

flfoaseacbusette 



Bgricultural 

Colleae 



AND 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE OF BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



OFFERS 



1. SHORT COURSES us follows: 

(a) A Short Worm Course in Dairy Farming. Open to persons of both sexes. 
Applicants must be at least sixteen years old and must furnish certificates of good 
character. No entrance examination is required. Tuition free to citizens of the United 
States. Begins first Thursday in January and continues ten weeks. 

(b) A Short Course in Bee Culture. Begins the fourth Wednesday in May and 
continues two weeks. 

(c) A Summer School of Agriculti re. Intended more particularly for teachers 
who wish to introduce some form of agricultural instruction into the grades or into the 
high schools. A two-weeks' course for country clergymen wishing to get into touch 
with the larger phases of the agricultural problems. Technical courses for all persons 
desiring to improve the summer vacation by practical study of various forms of agricul- 
ture and horticulture. 

2. A POUR TEARS' COURSE, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
Admission granted on certificate from approved high schools and academies. Required 
studies during Freshman and Sophomore years. During Junior and Senior jears, students 
may elect the major part of their work. Courses are offered in Agriculture, General Horti- 
culture, Pomology, Floriculture, Market Gardening, Landscape Gardening, Botany, Veterin- 
inary Science, Entomology, Physics. Civil Engineering, Mathematics, Modem Languages, 
Chemistry, Zoology, etc. 

3. POST GRADUATE COURSES leading to the degrees of Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Tuition Free to residents in the United States. 

Necessary expenses do not exceed $250 per annum. 

For further information apply to the president, Kenton L. Butterfield, Amherst,. Mass. 



THE COLLEGE SM AL 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



VOL.. 18 



NO. 17 



MASSACHUSETTS 



AGRICULTURAL 



COLLEGE 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE, 15. 1908 



We would like a share of your patronage, we are reliable and well known. 
All the boys get the habit of coming to us when they know the town We 
have Custom and Ready-made Clothing, Sweaters, Gloves, Oil Clothing, and in 
tact everything you need to wear, you will find at 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON'S 



BRIAR A PIPES 



ENGLISH 




FINISH 



^^^f 



B. E. MILLETl , 

JEWELER AND OPTICIAN. 

Fine Watch-work a Specialty. 

VIOIiIN, BANJO, MAJWDOLIN, GUITAR STRINGS. 



OCCULI8TS PRESCRIPTIONS FILLED. 




GO TO 



Page's SDoe Store 

LARGEST STOCK 

Repairing done by power machines, as 
good as new. 



Deuel's Drug Store. 



SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING 

promptly done at the office of 

W. R. BROWN, 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Agent, Savings Bank Block. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



VOL. XVIII. 



AMHERST. MASS.. JUNE 15. 1908 



NO. 17 



Published Fortnightly by Students of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 

Students and Alumni are requested to contribute. Communications should be addressed. Collsoe Signal. Amhbrst. Mass. Ths Sional will t>e 
sent to ali subscribers unti 1 its discontinuance Is ordered and arrears are paid. Subscribers who do not receive their paper regularly are requested to 
notify the Business Manager. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

H. L. WHITE. 1909. Editor-in-Chief. 
O. B. BRIGGS, 1909, Business Manager. 
E. F. DAMON, 1910. Assistant Business Manager. 
R. C. POTTER. 1909. College Notes. W. R.CLARKE, 1910. Department Notes. 

M. F. GEER. 1909, Alumni Notes. L. C. BROWN, 1910, Athletic Notes. 

C. H. WHITE. 1909. Y. M. C. A. Notes. H. A. BROOKS, 1910. Special. 

R. N. HALLOWELL. 191 I. 
S. R. PARSONS. 1911. 



Terms t SI.OO per year iu adtance. Single Copies, IOc. Postage outside of United States and Canada. Use. extra. 



Athletic Board. 
Foot- Ball Association. 
Basket- Ball Association, 
Base Ball Association. 



SIGHAL'S DIRECTORY. 

Prof. S. F. Howard. Sec. Fraternity Conference 

M. W. Thompson. Manager. 
H. M. Jennison. Manager. 
S. S. Crossman, Manager . 
College Senate. 



Nineteen Hundred and Nine Index 
Y. M. C A. 
Musical Association. 

K. E. Gillett. President. 



J. R. Parker, Pres. 
R. D. LuP. Manager. 
C. H. White. Pret. 
H. M Jennison, Manager. 



Entered as second-class matter. Post Off lea at Amherst. 



Edi-tbri&ls. 



A Signal Board meeting was held June 4. The 
editor made a report on the annual conference of the 
N. E. I. P. A , held at the Westminster Hotel, 
Boston, May 22. Plans for improvement of the 
Signal in all its departments were discussed pre- 
paratory to putting them in active operation at the 
opening of the next college year. 



Commencement days have come and with them 
all the joys and sorrows of the end. The joys are 
those of the child who takes another step, the sorrows 
those of the parting friend who grasps your hand and 
says goodbye. The class of 1908 has reached the 
goal and is about to snatch the prize and bear it forth 
in triumph. Whatever of pain, whatever of pleas- 
ure the journey run has cost, they will be treated alike 
on the hearthstone of thememory through years of sun- 
shine and of storm. The "commencement" is but 
the beginning of life's work. 

In behalf of the classes of 1909, 1910 and 1911 



the Signal extends to you, 1908. a farewell. You have 
spent four years of your life in a way you will never 
regret. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts has 
provided for you lecture and recitation halls, labora- 
tories and apparatus, instructors and courses of In- 
struction. She has, through her public servants, 
brought to your assembly halls men of wide ex- 
perience with words of inspiration and value. And 
all she asks of you is that you shall do your duty as 
citizens. That duty lies In paths of unselfish devo- 
tion to ideals which the democracy of your Alma 
Mater endeavors to instill into every man who leaves 
htr doors. This duty demands that you shall make 
the most of your time, yonr talents, and your educa- 
tion. Honor first the state that has made possible a 
college course ; then seek to reflect glory on the in- 
stitution that has harbored and fostered your ambi- 
tions through an age of discovery of self and realization 
of possibilities. Do not quit '• Massachusetts " walks 
forever. Let not the thrall of business or pleasure 
prevent your coming back to these familiar haunts, 
now and then. Keep In touch with the college 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



through the columns of her newspaper. Respond to 
her calls for financial assistance in her activities, 
for moral support in her ideals. Tell the world about 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College and at all 
times and in all places fail not to speak optimistically 
regarding the future of your Alma Mater. Go— take 
with you the best wishes of the College. 



Althouch the college has adhered to the policy 
of facing the future rather than glancing backward, 
one must feel that the true significance of the year's 
work can be gleaned only by retrospection. The 
past twelve months have been months of steady pro- 
gress. Forces have been at work all the while in a 
general uplift of the whole mechanism. The first 
force and one which, if persisted in, will make itself 
felt even outside of college halls, was the remarkably 
successful session of the Massachusetts Summer 
School of Agriculture. That the initial attempt to 
interest the public school teachers and officials of the 
state in the work of M. A. C. by bringing them into 
actual contact with the methods employed should 
have resulted so gratifyingly reflects credit on both 
the originators and movers of the project. The 
Massachusetts Agricultural College has been striving 
for two score years to reach the people of the state 
in general. To convince the majority of the citizens 
of the commonwealth that M. A. C. is an essential 
part of the whole is an aim which must be constantly 
sought. A season of comparative national prosperity, 
the subsequent trend of urbanites countryward bring- 
ing with them the culture and enlightenment of the city 
to be added to the practicality of the ruralist, the 
more general adoption of improved means of travel, 
the liberality of the press, and other lesser controlling 
causes are preparing the people for the aggresive 
invasion of agricultural education extension work now 
being carried on by the executives of the College. 
The results of the Summer School aside from keep- 
ing the College in the mind's eye are going to come 
from sources too deep to be realized in one or two or 
three years. When those grade teachers who have 
spent a part of their summers at the School have 
passed ther pupils on to a High School career they 
will have instilled into them, by courses in elemen- 
tary agriculture and allied subjects, the importance 
and advantage of furthering their studies at the Mas- 



the 



sachusetts Agricultural College. Then will 
dreams of the structure-builders prove true. 

The year began with many new members on the 
faculty and the loss of some of last years instructors. 
The resignations and appointments were made chiefly 
previous to the close of the preceding semester. 
Professor Cooley who resigned to accept a position in 
Bozeman, Montana, was succeeded by Professor 
Foord. S. B. Haskell was granted a year's leave of 
absence to study in Europe and Mr. Gribben was ap- 
pointed to fill that vacancy. Mr. Herrick was suc- 
ceeded by Professor Armagnac whose death in Janu- 
ary abruptly ended his career as instructor in modern 
languages. W. V. Munson was elected to the 
position. Dr Charles A. Goessmann resigned 
from the Experiment Station staff in June 
1907. Dr. Lindsey was promoted to his position. 
Professor F. C. Sears, a graduate of Kansas Agri- 
cultural College was elected professor of pomology. 
Professor Hart was placed in charge of the new 
course in agricultural education. The efficiency of 
the chemistry department was mat3rially increased 
by the appointment of Messrs. Thornton, Fowler and 
Holmes as instructors. Frank M. Gracey, Boston 
Normal Art School, '06, succeeded C. P. Halligan, 
'03, in the draughting department. FredC.Kenney, 
for many years cashier of Michigan Agricultural Col- 
lege accepted the call to treasurership here. In May 
of this year Edgar L. Ashley, Brown '03, was chosen 
instructor in German, for the comming year. Sum- 
marily five losses from and eleven additions to the 
faculty occurred during the past twelve months. 

The fortieth anniversary celebration and conference 
on rural progress in the fall brought the college face to 
face with the people. The press gave the doings of the 
conference considerable space and favorable comment. 
Clark Hall was completed and thoroughly equip- 
ped. The Museum vacated by the botanical de- 
partment was overhauled to receive the department of 
mathematics, physics and engineering. This allowed 
a new laboratory to be fitted up in the chemistry 
building and a zoological and geological laboratory in 
South College. The short dairy course proved as 
well patronized and successful as ever. Two new 
courses were introduced, one in Vocational Education 
under Professor Hart, the other a freehand drawing 
course under Mr. Gracey. Vesper services on Sun- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



days have been a feature, which has not been too well 
patronized. The series of Sunday morning talks 
during the spring months have been of inestimable 
value to those who attended. The fitting up of 
a Trophy Room was the first step of the year 
toward a Social Union. Following upon this came 
the college suppers the last of which aroused 
the heartiest enthusiasm. Then plans for refitting 
North College and the devotion of the entire 
lower floor to the Union and offices of student enter- 
prizes were made and lastly a president and vice- 
president, protem, elected by the student body. 
An aggregate of approximately $93,000 was ap- 
propriated by the Legislature for the purpose of re- 
pair, equipment, a new rifle range and hall of floricul- 
ture with attached green-houses. High School Day, 
an annual event of importance, was inaugurated. 
The new building of the first agricultural high school 
in the state at Petersham was dedicated. 

The progress which the College has made at the 
hands of the trustees and faculty has been fully 
equaled by the students in their various activities. 
The football season was one of the best that M. A. 
C. has ever experienced. Out of nine games played, 
five were won, one tied, and three lost. The 
basket-ball season, while carried through to a finish 
in spite of discouragements was not successful from 
the standpoint of victories. The schedule was com- 
mendable, the team played hard but strange floors 
and new rules counted much against victory. The 
baseball season with a veteran team in play shows a 
total of sixteen games played, nine games won, six lost 
and one to play. The indoor and outdoor inter- 
class track meets were events of special significance 
in that they have shown what the student body might 
do with a track and athletic field if they had 
one. Then there were the Freshman-Sophomore 
contests and the Senior-Faculty baseball game. 
Athletics are on the upward move and the recently 
passed anti-tax-dodging law will insure the future suc- 
cess of this important element of college life. 

The social phase has been well carried out by a 
series of enjoyable informal dances at the Drill Hall. 
These have been well patronized. In the fall the 
Mettawampe club was formed and the members have 
taken many long tramps to the surrounding hills. 
The band has performed creditably before assembly 



period audiences ; the musical association clubs have 
given several concerts both at the college and at 
town events. New rushing rules were tried out by 
the fraternity conference and while found wanting in 
some respects proved superior to anything yet. The 
Y. M. C. A. instituted a course of Bible study which 
met a great need among the fellows. 

In the journalistic sphere the regular publications 
have continued along the usual lines, IK) marked 
improvement being shown. The 1909 Index in its 
entirety was no whit behind its predecessor. The 
Signal has striven to maintain the policy of a news- 
paper and the periodical speaking organ of the college 
combined. 

Withal, the numerous and varied activities of the 
year have stimulated the interest of everyone no 
matter what his bent. While at low ebb, at times, 
the spirit shown by the students has been of the best. 
An atmosphere of greater earnestness in collegiate 
work has hung over the College throughout the year. 
And too it seems that the example set by the admin- 
istration of looking toward the future for better and 
brighter things has met response in the hearts of 
every loyal undergraduate. This policy has met with 
hearty aoproval amcng the alunvii and their ahnnual 
dinners have been marked by prophecy as much as 
by retrospection, and Massachusetts "Aggie" days 
made dearer thereby. 



/Athletic Notes- 



BASEBALL. 

M. A. C, 4; Training School, I. 

The team trimmed the Training School in an inter- 
esting game on the latter's grounds, June 3. John- 
son was fairly effective, but wild at times, while Hub- 
bard was on his job all the way. He allowed only 
four hits, and struck out seven, and passed none. 

The score: — 





MASSACHUSETTS. 












A. 8. 


It. 


B. 


t.O. 


A. 


B. 


Cobb, lb.. 


4 





1 


13 








O Donnell. s.s., 


3 





1 


2 


5 


1 


Shattuck. 2b.. 


5 








1 


1 





Hubbard, p., 


3 


1 


1 





5 





F. Warner. If., 


5 








2 








Tllton. 3b., 


4 





2 





2 





O'Grady c.f.. 


4 


2 


1 











T.J. Warner, r.f .. 


2 


1 


2 


1 








French, c. 


4 








6 









Totals, 



34 



27 



13 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



SPRINGFIELD TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Winters, l.f.. 
Hon hart, 2 b., 
Cray s.s.. 
J. Johnson, c. 
Messer, r.f.. 
Fleming, lb., 
Moller, 3b., 
A. Johnson, p.. 
Bailey, c.f., 

Totals, 



A.B. 

4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
3 

29 



K. 


I 











B. 
1 
I 




1 



1 






P.O. 

2 
6 
1 

4 
I 
10 
2 



26 



A. 



1 

3 
1 


O 

1 





Bases on balls— Off Johnson. 6. Struck out-Bv Hubbard 7. by John- 
son 4. Hit by pitched ball ; O'Donnell. Hubbard 2. Time— 1 n., 45 mln. 

Holy Cross, 3; M. A. C, 1. 

This game was a pitchers' battle, and was about 
evenly divided between Cobb and Foley. He had 
six strike-outs, allowed two bases on balls, and five 
hits. In only one inning, however, did Holy Cross 
get as many as two hits. A triple to the left by 
O' Burke was the only extra bagger. Foley struck 
out eight but passed eight also. Only two hits were 
obtained from him. The fielding by our team was 
wretched, practically losing the game for us. 

The score, by innings: — 

Innings, 
Holy Cross. 
Massachusetts. 

M. A. C, 7; Boston College, 4. 

The baseball team trimmed B. C, on the Boston 
field. June 6. The support Hubbard received was 
excellent, Cobb especially putting up a nice game. 
The scoring on our side was steady, the runs coming 
in small bunches during five innings out of the nine. 
Tilton and Chet Warner hit well. 

The score: — 

MASSACHUSETTS 



Runs made— By Tilton 3, French 2, T. Warner. Ryan. O'Kane, Doyle. 
Low. Hubbard. Two-base hit— Cox. Stolen bases- Wa'sh 2. Low. Base 
on balls-Off Mahoney 4, off Hubbard. Sacrifice hits -Shattuck— O'Don- 
nell. Hit by pitched ball— O'Kane. Umpire -Ga'lagher. Time— lh., 45 
min, 

Wesleyan Academy, 15; 1910, 2. 

The Sophomore team went to Wllbraham, last 
Monday and were defeated by the score indicated 
above. The field was abominable. The grass on 
the infield was only four inches long and abundant, 
while the outfield was about ripe for haying. The 
numerous ditches In the left and center did not tend 
to facilitate ground covering. The trees in right made 
it cool there for Damon but did not aid him in field- 
ing the flies that came his way. The hitting of 
Whalen and Brady, were the features. 

The score : — 



i 
o 





2 
t 





3 





s 






6 






7 





8 
I 




9 
-3 
0-1 



Cobb, lb., 
O'Donnell. s.s.. 
Shattuck, 2b., 
Hubbard, p., 
F. Warner, l.f. 
Tilton, 3b.. 
O'Crady. of., 
T.Warner, r.f., 
French, c. 

Totals. 



Ryan, l.f.. 
Fox, s.s , 
Walsh. 3b.. 
O'Kane, c.f.. 
Doyle, c. 
Manning, lb., 
Maloney. p.. 
O'Brien, r.f., 
Low. 2b.. 

Totals. 

Innings, 
Massachusetts. 
Boston College. 



B.M. 


1 
1 
1 


3 

2 
I 



BOSTON COLLEGE. 



B.H. 

I 

2 
1 

I 



I 

1 



P.O. 

11 
2 



3 
4 

1 
6 

27 



P.O. 

2 
2 
1 
3 
7 
10 


2 



A. 



1 

3 
I 


3 






A. 


3 
1 

I 



2 



R. 





1 







1 



E. 



2 

1 


2 


2 



Dunham, l.f.. 
Baldwin, m., 2b., 
Haskins. 2b., s.s.. 
Whalen, c. 
Parker, p.. 
Kidd, r.f.. 
Moody s.s., 
Cooduh. m.. 
Brady. 3b., 
Pratt. lb- 
Totals. 



Damon, r.f.. 
Rockwood, 2b., 
Schermerhorn. If., 
Brown, s.s.. 
Partridge. 3b.. 
Cowles, m.. 
Brandt, lb., 
Blaney, p.. 
Thomas, c. 

Totals. 
Innings, 
Wesleyan. 

Massachusetts. 



WESLEYAN. 

A.B. 

3 
3 
S 

4 
4 
5 
3 

4 
4 

35 

MASSACHUSETTS '10. 

A.B. 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
2 
2 
4 



B. 
1 


2 
2 
I 

I 


I 
I 

10 



I 

2 
I 
I 


1 







P.O. 



1 
11 



2 

3 
10 

27 



P.O. 


2 
I 


I 



15 



5 



A. 




4 

4 

2 


1 

I 

12 



A. 



I 



1 




6 
I 



t 









I 



1 

3 





I 

I 


2 
1 



2 



1 






3 
3 





31 

4 





5 
5 
2 



6 






24 
7 
3 





9 7 

8 9 
3 -15 
0-2 



1 2 3 
1 





4 





7 27 

5 6 7 

1 1 

I 



7 7 

8 9 

3 1-7 

1 2-4 



Runs- Baldwin 3. Dunham. Haskins 2. Whalen 3. Parker 2. Moody. 
Jackson, Pratt. Rockwood. Schermerhorn. Total bases— Wesleyan 15. 
Massachusetts '10. 12. Sacrifice hits— Dunham 2, Parker. Haskins, Brandt 
2. Stolen bases— Wesleyan 7. Massachusetts '10 2. Two-base hit- 
Moody. Three-base hits— Whalen 2. First base on balls— By Blaney 4. 
by Parker 2. Struck out— By Blaney 5, by Parker 7. Batter hit-By 
Blaney I. Passed ball— Thomas. Wild pitch— Blaney. Time— lh.. 50 
mln. Umpire— Dower. 

Freshmen. 6 ; So. Hadley Falls, 4. 
The Freshmen defeated the team representing 
South Hadley Falls, last week, 6-4., in an interest- 
ing game. Little hitting was done. 

Innings. 123456789 

Freshmen. 2 3 10 0—6 

South Hadley High, 1 110 1 0-4 

Amherst, 1911, II ; M. A. C, 1911; 0. 
The Freshmen took a patched up team to Pratt 
Field, last Saturday, and got it rubbed into them. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



The game became such a farce that Amherst re- 
frained from going to bat at all during the last two 
innings. The M. A. C, Freshmen got only three 
hits, but plenty of errors. Piper pitched good ball, 
but his support was not in evidence. 
The score : — 





AMHERST. 


1911 


















A.B. 




B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Campbell, lb.. 






5 




1 


13 





2 


Henofer. s.s.. 






4 







1 


2 





Clark. 2b., 






3 




1 


1 


1 





Kittle, r.f.. 






4 




1 


y 








Bryan. 3b., 






3 




1 





3 


1 


Thompson, c, 






3 




1 


12 








Crittenden, l.f.. 






4 
















Jones, p.. 






4 










5 


1 


Paul, m.. 























Carey, m.. 






1 
















Total. 






31 




5 


27 


11 


4 




MASSACHUSETTS. 1911 
















A.B 




B. 


P.O. 


A. 


E. 


Piper, p.. 






3 







1 


5 





Coash, s.s.. 






1 













1 


Bursley. m . 






3 







2 





2 


Brown, l.f.. 






3 







1 





2 


Robb. c. 






4 




1 


3 


3 


1 


Morse. 3b.. 






4 







2 


2 





Nickerson, lb.. 






4 







9 


1 


1 


Bentley, 2b., 






4 













1 


Daniels, m., s.s.. 






3 




2 


2 


2 


5 


Moody, r.f., 






3 













1 


Total. 






32 




3 


•20 


13 


14 


Innings. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


Amherst, 


4 





2 


a 








2 


0—11 



Runs-Campbell. Henofer, Clark 2. Kittle. Bryan 3, Thompson 2. Paul. 
Sacrifice hit -Clark. Stolen bases-Henofer, Clark, Kittle. Bryan. Thomp- 
son, Paul. First base on balls -Thompson, Paul 2, Leftlon bases— 
Amherst 5, Massachusetts 6. Struck out— Henofer. Crittenden, Jones. 
Piper. Bursley 2. Brown 3. Morse 3. Nickerson. Bentley, Daniels. Batters 
hit— Bryan. Paul. Brown. Passed ball— Robb. Wild pitch— Jones. 
TiPne-1 h., 50 mln. Umpire— Caughey. "Jones out, hit by batted ball, 

/ The baseball season just closing has been one of 
the best that the college ever had. The biggest vic- 
tory for us was the second game, when Brown was 
able to score only 3 to our 6. The Amherst game 
was disappointing, but the team put up a game fight 
nevertheless. University of Vermont was taken Into 
camp when they visited us, but they got their revenge 
later, winning two close games on their own field. 
Dartmouth and Holy Cross had to exert themselves 
some to push more across than we did. All the 
home games so far have come our way, and there is 
no doubt about the last one, as we have already de- 
feated Boston College on their own grounds. 
Following is a Summary of the games: — 
Massachusetts, 3; Rhode Island College, 4. 
Massachusetts, 6; Brown University, 3. 
Massachusetts, ; Amherst, 2. 
Massachusetts, 10; Springfield Training School, 2. 
Massachusetts, 12; Norwich University, 4. 
Massachusetts, 7 ; Worcester Tech, 4. 



Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 
Massachusetts, 



1 ; University of Vermont, 0. 

4 ; Conn. Agricultural College, 0. 

4; Dartmouth, 6. 

6 ; Norwich University, 3. 

0; University of Vermont, I. 

I ; University of Vermont, 5. 

4; Training School. 1. 

1 ; Holy Cross, 3. 

7 ; Boston College, 4. 
— ; Boston College, — 



THE TENNIS TOURNAMENT. 

The tennis preliminaries have been played, but the 
semi-finals have been delayed by the examinations of 
the past week. As we go to press the semi-finals 
and finals have not been played. The result of the 
prelims are as follows: Rockwood defeated Webb 
three straight sets ; 6- 1 , 6-0, 6-3. Parker de- 
feated Armstrong in a series that was close all the 
way. The scores were: 6-3, 4-6, 4-6, 6-1 , 7-5. 

Wilson had to play four sets with Noyes before he 
could claim the victory. The scores : 6-3. 6-0, 6-8, 
6-3. Hayes defeated Jen easily, 6-2, 6-0, 6-3. 



THE REVEILLE OF RIGHTEOUSNESS. 

Abstract from the baccalaureate address by Presi- 
dent Kenyon L. Butterfield, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. June 14, 1908. 

The soldier is awakened by the stirring bugle notes 
of the reveille. He rouses from slumber, perchance 
from dreams of ease, to face the day's duty, drill, 
march, battle, perhaps death itself. We are called 
to a warfare to establish on earth the reign of justice, 
the everlasting Kingdom of God. The bugle call Is 
the Reveille of Righteousness. 

On every hand leaders are arising to sound this 
bugle call. Perhaps the man of our day who more 
than any other has been the great preacher of public 
righteousness is Theodore Roosevelt. Some years 
ago he said, 

"No man Is worth much to the commonwealth if 
he is not capable of feeling righteous wrath and just 
indignation, If he Is not stirred to hot anger by misdo- 
ing, and is not Impelled to see justice meted out to 
the wrong-doers. No man is worth much anywhere 
if he does not possess both moral and physical 
courage." 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



This fight, for social and political righteousness is 
not a passing phase of th« life of our time, nor an 
issue that is merely the hobby of a few people who 
have nothing else to do. It is a deep rooted, wide- 
spread campaign for moral ends. No man with his 
eyes open, no educated man, no college man, can 
afford to neglect the facts, nor should he fail in his 
duty to ally himself with the forces of righteousness. 

This reveille of righteousness is a call to the slum- 
bering consciences of all our people, busy but blind in 
their hives of prosperous industry. It is a bugle call 
to the church, because the religious motive is the 
highest motive which can be invoked as a war cry for 
the conquest both of vice and sin. It is a call to 
every man who loves his flag. But peculiarly is it a 
call to the college men and women who are ready to 
commence their life-work. It seems to me that you 
who are about to leave us should therefore take to 
heart in a peculiar way these lessons of the day, and 
should respond joyfully to the new reveille. How 
many and how strong the appeals to you for such a 
response ! 

There is the appeal of moral duty. You cannot 
afford to live on any but the highest plane. You 
have no right to indulge in immoral practices. You 
have no right indeed to fail In the habitual practice of 
the very highest virtue. The laws of righteousness 
are eternal. You cannot give the reins to a runaway 
appetite without disaster to others as well as yourself. 
You may fool a man in a trade and call it "business," 
but the black mark on your soul is made just the 
same. You may neglect your duty as a citizen, but 
the blood of the men of Valley Forge and Gettysburg 
will call to you from the ground. 

There is the appeal of sonship. Our sires were 
men who met the issues of their day unflinchingly. 
We are now entering upon a conflict in which it is to 
be determined whether social righteousness is to pre- 
vail. In this conflict you are called upon to do your 
part as sons of noble fathers, as citizens of a common 
country, as beneficiaries of the bounty of state and 
nation. 

There is to some of you the appeal of Christian dis- 
cipleship. 

May we not believe that you will go forth from these 
years of fellowship and joy, not merely to earn a liv- 
ing, not merely to secure comfort and luxury and 



high position and perhaps fame, but to fight the good 
fight against the foes within the soul, against greed 
and selfishness without? 

The Spartan mother told her son to return with his 
shield or on it. Shall your Alma Mater be thought 
unkind if she sends you forth to a battle, with the 
same message? Shall she not expect that as you 
come back to her from time to time through the 
lengthening years, you will come as strong men and 
women who have responded to the bugle calls of your 
generation ? She cares not that you may bring scars, 
if the wounds are in front and were made in good 
cause. She cares not even if you shall come from a 
field of defeat, if you have faced the foe valiantly. 
But she does ask that you shall meet the obligations 
of your day with courage and with honor. 

I beg that not one of you shall think of this matter 
lightly, nor regard this appeal as merely a necessary 
piece of rhetoric. Your personal welfare is at stake. 
Your business future is involved. The country which 
gave you birth and which has educated you has a 
claim on you and she is calling for your aid. You 
will soon be among the throng who tread the highway 
of toil. The heat, and the dust, and the crowd may 
take from you this vision of the morning. The notes 
of the reveille may be lost in the confused clamor of 
the mart and the office. To guard against such dis- 
aster to you and misfortune to your college I can 
hardly hope that these words of mine shall prove an 
aid in the days to come. But let me point you again 
to the example of that great preacher of righteous- 
ness, that knight-errant of the modern moral chivalry, 
Theodore Roosevelt. History will inscribe against 
his name faults and mistakes, but she will also write 
that he was the first and perhaps the greatest of his 
generation to sound afresh this reveille of righteous- 
ness. So let me leave with you the closing words of 
his great sermon on this subject, his clarion bugle- 
call to us all, which took the form of a remarkable 
message to Congress last January: 

"In the work we of this generation are in, there is, 
thanks be to the Almighty, no danger of bloodshed 
and no use for the sword ; but there is grave need of 
those stern qualities shown alike by the men of the 
North and the men of the South in the dark days 
when each gallantly battled for the light as it was given 
each to see the light. Their spirit should be our spirit 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 






as we strive to bring nearer the day when greed and 
trickery and cunning shall be trampled under teet by 
those who fight for the righteousness that exalteth a 

nation." 

Colleg? N°t?s- 

H. P.Crosby, '09, entertained his sister last week. 

The Sophomores are rapidly completing decorations 
for the promenade. 

Professor Osmun has collected and set out several 
rare ferns about Clark Hall. 

C. H. White, '09, has been chosen to answer the 
pipe oration on 1908 class day. 

Because of the number of men in the graduating 
class the Senior fence has been enlarged to quite an 
extent. 

Prof. Robert Neal has left Amherst for New York 
City, where he will spend the summer on.special 
work at Columbia University. 

Two pictures of the baseball teams of the years, 
'90 and '91, were presented to the Trophy Room by 
W. C. Paige. '91. Mr. Paige captained both 
teams. 

Work has been started on the target range for 
next year. Plans to send a rifle team to New York 
to represent the college at the intercollegiate shoo t 
are on foot. 

The following men have been elected to the Senate 
from the class of 1909: S. S. Crossman, G. R. 
Fulton, O. C. Bartlett, Paul E. Alger, W. E. Geer. 
From the class of 1910: H. A. Brooks, W. E. 
Leonard, F. T. Haynes, W. R. Clarke. 

At a recent meeting of the basketball team R. C. 
Lindblad, '09, was elected manager and E.J. Burke, 
'10, captain. The following men were nominated for 
assistant manager: R. A. Waldron, '10, R. H. 
Allen, '10, and W. E. Leonard, '10. 

The prospects for a large Freshman class next 
semester are encouraging. Fifteen hundred extra 
copies of the catalogue were printed and the supply 
remaining at date is being carefully guarded. The 
registrar reports an unusual number of applications 
for certificate blanks. 

The following men were chosen by the fraternities 
to the Fraternity Conference : Q. T. V. — A. W. 



Hubbard, E. H. Turner; C. S. C— 0. C. Bartlett, 
W. E. Leonard; Kappa Sigma — R. C. Lindblad, 
R. H. Allen; Phi Sigma Kappa — M. W. Thomp- 
son, R. H. Armstrong. 

The New England Farmer prints the following : 
Prof. W. R. Hart of the agricultural college at 
Amherst has succeeded in arousing great interest 
among the boys and girls of Hampshire county in 
potato culture. More than 300 from different towns 
have joined the potato club. He has given to each 
member six potatoes with directions for planting 
them. The trustees of the Hampshire Agricultural 
society have assisted the professor by offering pre- 
miums for the largest yield, the highest grade, the 
best type, the largest potato and for the fewest pota- 
toes that shall make up the weight of 15 pounds. 
More than 100 children have entered into competition 
for premiums offered by the society for the best yield 
and the best ear of sweet corn. The products will be 
exhibited at the Amherst fair, Sept. 22, when Pro- 
fessor Hart will address the members of the club and 
make provisions for subordinate clubs in different 
communities. 



FLINT ORATORICAL CONTEST. 

On Friday night, June 12, the first event on the 
Commencement program took place in the chapel. 
The picked men of the junior class competed lauda- 
bly for the Flint prizes in oratory before an apprecia- 
tive audience. Professor Mills presided and 
announced the speakers and subjects as follows: 
PROGRAMME 
II usic 
Oscar Christopher Bartlett, . Westhampton 
The /ndcf>cndmt Voter 

RICHARD Chute Potter Concord 

Marcus Aurelitts 

Myron Franc is Geer, Springfield 

Yelloiii Journalism 

GboRGI Murray Brown, Jr Cambridge 

Chnalry in the Fight with the Saloon 
Charles Howard White, . . Providence, R. I. 

Tivo Views in a Great City 
Marcus Thomas Smueyan, . New York, N. V. 
Race Suicide 
The judges were . Rev. VV. L. Anderson, Mr. 
Charles W. Marshall and Dr. Frederick Tuckerman. 



8 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



BURNHAM DECLAMATIONS. 

On Saturday night, June 13, the contestants for 
the Burnham prizes, from the Freshman class met in 
the chapel. Professor Mills presided and introduced 
the speakers as follows : 

PROGRAMME 
Music 

Herbert J. Baker, Selbyville, Del. 

The Home in the Republic — Grady 

Herbert W. Blaney, Swampscott 

Address to the Sons of Liberty — Bates Student 

Harold H. Howe, Springfield 

Eulogy on President Garfield — Blaine 

Irvino W. Davis, Lowell 

Adams and Jefferson — Webster 

Allyn P. Bursley, .... West Barnstable 

The Victor of Marengo— Joel T. Headley 

Royal N. Halloweli Jamaica Plain 

G rattan's Reply to Corey 
Substitute Speakers 

Harold B. Drury Athol 

Irvin C. Gilgore Schenectady, N. Y. 

The judges were : Rev. Donald McFayden, Mr. 
A. L. Hardy, Mr. W. J. Reilly. 



SENIOR LANDSCAPE CLASS ITINERARY. 

The senior class in landscape gardening under the 
guidance of Professor Waugh left Amherst Wednes- 
day, June 3, for Boston where they spent a week in 
the study of the Metropolitan Park System. The fol- 
lowing provisional schedule was issued previous to the 
trip. 

Thursday, June 4. 
9-30 A. M. Reconnoissance of Franklin Park, Arnold 

Arboretum, and Olmsted Park. 
1-30 p. m. Olmsted Park and Muddy River Park- 
way, with sketches of Parkman Memorial, 
bridges and measured cross section of 
roadways. 

Friday, June 5. 
8-30 a. m. Study of Franklin Park, particularly the 
Glade and adjoining parts. Maps by 
squads. 
1-30 p.m. Same, with topography of crossroads. 

Saturday, June 6. 
8-30 a. m. Study playgrounds with sketch maps. 



1-30 p.m. Observation on park visitors, Franklin 

Park and Franklin Field. 
Sunday, June 7. 
9-30 a. m. Trip to Blue Hills. 
2-30 p. m. Observation on park visitors, Franklin 

Park, Boston Common, Revere Beach, 

Blue Hills. 

Monday, June 8. 
9-30 a. m. Study Muddy River Parkway with 

detailed surveys, including profiles of 

drives. 
1-30 P. M. Study plantings in Parkway and Olmsted 

park; also Commonwealth Ave. 

Tuesday, June 9, 
8-30 a. m. Study drives and walks in Franklin Park. 

Profiles. 
1-30 p.m. Visit Marine Park, public baths, and 

Woods' Island. 

Wednesday, June 10. 
8-30 a. m. Franklin Park; study organization, main- 
tenance, management, itemized cost, etc. 
1-30 p. m. Study future development of Boston park 
system. 
This was not a play spell nor a junket, but straight 
college work in direct charge of an instructor. The 
Boston park system is known to be one of the best in 
America. Many of the separate tracts represent the 
best designing of such famous landscape architects as 
Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr., and Charles Eliot, and 
the present organization and management of the work 
are also superior. The time of the class was divided 
about equally between the study of the designs on the 
ground and the investigation of methods of adminis- 
tration. Franklin Park was headquarters, where the 
Park Department very generously supplied work 
rooms, offices and everything to make the class com- 
fortable. Besides the city park system proper visits 
were made to parts of the Metropolitan reservations, 
beaches, public baths and playgrounds. The boys 
were especially impressed with the public provision 
made for outdoor athletics in all the parks, play 
grounds, etc. Everybody had a good time in spite of 
the hard work and the trip was unanimously voted to 
have been a very profitable one. It is hoped that 
this may become a permanent feature of the instruc- 
tion in landscape gardening. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



TRACK AND FIELD RECORDS. 

In accordance with Articles 2 and 3, Rule 5, of 
the Constitution and By-laws of the M. A. C. Ath- 
letic Board the following college records were broken 
at the recent meet : 

Running High Jump by K.E Gillett. '08. height. 5 ft. 7 1-2 in. 

Putting 16 Pound Shot by H. P. Crosby, '09, distance. 37 ft. 
9 in. 

Throwing Discus (4 lb. 4 oz.) by W. E. Leonard. '10. dis- 
tance. 102 2-10 ft. 

100 Yard Dash by G. N. Lew. '11, time, 10 2-5 sec. 

220 Yard Low Hurdles by W.F Sawyer. '08. time. 29 2-5 sec 
The other college records at present (June 1908) 

are: 

220 Yard Dash, S. P. Tool. '95, time, 24 2-5 sec. 

440 Yard Dash. J. H. Chickering. '01. time. 56 !-5 sec. 

880 Yard Run, E. L. Macomber. 1901. time. 2 min. 10 sec. 

Mile Run. H. E. Maynard. '99, time. 4 min. 57 sec. 

120 Yard Hurdles. L. C Claflin. '02. time. 18 3-5 sec. 

Running Broad Jump. F.B.Shaw.'96.distance, 20 ft. 6 3-4 in 

Pole Vault. F. B. Shaw. "96. distance. 8 ft. 9 in. 

One Mile Bicycle. E.E.Saunders, 01. time, 2 min. 28 2-5 sec. 

Throwing Hammer (16 lbs ) F. G. Stanley. '00. distance. 
104 ft. 5 in. 

S. Francis Howard, 

Secretary M. A. C. Athletic Board. 



Y- M. C- A. No-tes. 



The newly elected officers of the association have 
arranged a vigorous campaign for the ensueing year and 
the prospects for an increased interest in the fall is 
assured. 

Whether we are members of the association or 
not surely no student in college questions for a 
moment what the Y. M. C. A. as an organization is 
doing in the world at large. That the association 
should have one of the most conspicuous places in 
college activities is not asking too much for after all, 
character is the most important quality a man can 
cultivate in college. 

Carl Hamilton of Andover, gave a very inspiring 
talk at the closing meeting of the year Thursday, June 
4, his subject being "Individual Responsibility for 
Others." Mr. Hamilton was without doubt one of 
the strongest speakers the association has secured 
this year. 

Although the association is progressing from its 



status during previous years, yet there is still plenty 
of room for improvement. The average attendance 
during the year has been about forty men, out of a 
total membership of one hundred and twenty, includ- 
ing faculty members. 

Next fall a large entering class is anticipated and 
the officers of the association ask that each man con- 
sider the interests of the association during the sum- 
mer and come back with a determination to support 
it, that it may mean the most to the men who for 
the first time are launching out on their college 
course. 



Dtp&rtmfrvf f4ot{S. 

THE NEW RANGE OF GREENHOUSES AND 
ATTACHED TEACHING BUILDING, 

The facilities for giving instruction in commercial 
floriculture, and market gardening crops under glass, 
at Massachusetts Agricultural College have been 
inadequate. The "Durfee Plant House" and 
attached buildings have played an important part In 
the development of the Horticultural Division but 
they have long since outlived their usefulness. Being 
built for a botanical collection of palms, ferns and 
other ornamental and interesting plants, they were 
never suited for growing commercial crops such as 
carnations, roses, violets, lettuce, cucumbers and 
plants of a similar nature. The legislature of 1907 
and 1908 has made an appropriation of $34,000 for 
the erection of a commercial range of greenhouses 
and an attached teaching building, and when these 
buildings are completed the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College will be as finely equipped, if not better 
equipped, for giving Instruction In floriculture and 
garden crops grown under glass than any college in 
the United States. 

The instruction building will be a substantial brick 
structure of pleasing architecture and will occupy a 
site across the Stockbridge Drive nearly east of the 
Stockbridge House. The building will be two stories 
above the basement, and will contain three classroms, 
a large laboratory, an office, an exhibition room, a 
coat room, and a work room, besides storage rooms, 
lavatories, janitor's room, etc. This building will be 
used by the departments of floriculture and market 
gardening. When fully equipped for teaching the 
building will cost $17,000. Adjoining this building 
on the east will be the palm house, the dimensions of 
which will be 25x42 feet. Adjoining the palm house 
will be a students' house, 26x50 feet; and from the 



'. 







10 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



east end of this house an alley, 12 feet wide and 180 
feet long, will run directly south. Extending east 
and west from this alley there will be a violet house, 
cucumber house, lettuce house, tomato house, rose 
house, carnation house, and chrysanthemum and bed- 
ding plant house. The alley house will be used for 
propagation and for growing general plants. This 
range promises to give satisfactory results in every 
detail. 

The contracts for the erection of these buildings 
have not yet been let. The architect for the instruc- 
tion building is Mr. W. H. Ritchie, 1 10 State Street, 
Boston. Mr. Ritchie was a member of the commis- 
sion which designed the buildings for the Jamestown 
Exposition last year, and as he is a man of wide expe- 
rience and excellent taste the building is sure to 
be an ornament to the campus. 

The building committee of the trustees held a 
meeting at the College in May and voted to ask 
various firms making greenhouse construction a spec- 
ialty to draw plans and make specifications for the 
greenhouses, the same to be submitted to them at a 
meeting to be held during commencement week. 
They also voted to ask Mr. W. W. Rawson of Arling- 
ton, and Professor White to approve these specifica- 
tions. At the present time the details of construction 
are not definitely decided but the range will probably 
consist of four even-span houses and four two-thirds 
span houses built on concrete foundations. Three of 
these houses will probably be of iron frame and the 
remainder will be of the half-iron type of construction. 
The houses will be heated by steam from the central 
heating plant. Complete, the range will cost about 
$17,000. 

FLORICULTURE. 
Professor White recently took quite an extensive 
trip as the guest of Mr. John A. Payne, a greenhouse 
builder in Jersey City. Greenhouse establishments 
erected by Mr. Payne were visited in New Britain, 
Connecticut; Rye, New York; Yonkers, New York ; 
and Princeton, New Jersey. At Princeton Professor 
White had the pleasure of visiting many of the Uni- 
versity buildings, and of driving through some of the 
beautiful streets of the town. 

FARM. 
The Farm Department has made a valuable addi- 
tion to the herd by the purchase of Golden Leda's 
Lilly, 210902, a direct importation from the Island 
of Jersey. This cow has won several first 
prizes while in Jersey and she promises to be a 
valuable nucleus for the Jersey herd at M. A. C. 
Golden Leda's Lilly has some of the finest blood in 
the Island of Jersey. 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL. 

THE SOCIAL SIDE OF AGRICULTURE. 

One of the features of the Summer School at the 
College this year will be a discussion of the big facts 
and principles in rural organization. President 
Butt^rfield, who has a national reputation in this line, 
is to give a course and is to be supported by such 
well known men as Dr. T. M.Carver of Harvard, 
Professor W. D. Hurd, dean of the College of Agri- 
culture at the University of Maine, and others. 
President Butterfield's course will deal with the social 
aspect of agriculture. It will be to a large extent a 
descriptive course, simply setting forth the facts and 
merely indicating a few fundamental principles. The 
rural problem will be stated and its significance dis- 
cussed. Some solutions will be proposed. There 
will be also careful discussion of such important 
practical phases of the matter as the rural school, 
agricultural education, farmers' organizations, country 
church, the federation of rural forces for progress. 
This course will be given during the first half of 
August and will be well worth the while for any one 
to spend two weeks in Amherst at that time. 

BOTANY. 
The Department is establishing a fernery just east 
of Clark Hall, the fernery will contain all the ferns 
of Massachusetts including a rockery for rock ferns. 



A1 



umni. 



71. — E. E. Thompson of Worcester visited col- 
lege recently. 

'76.— C. Fred Deuel underwent a surgical opera- 
tion recently in the Norwood hospital at Northamp- 
ton. He was operated on over a year ago for appen- 
dicitis and a strain made a second operation neces- 
sary. He is reported to be getting along nicely, but 
will have to be confined for some time. 

'78.— Pres. C. H. Howe of Case School of 
Applied Science is president of the Cleveland Cham- 
ber of Commerce, which has a membership of 2000. 
and is the most active and influential body of its kind 
in the United States. He will also take a prominent 
part in the entertainment of the National Educational 
Association which meets in Cleveland the last of the 
month. There will be an attendance of 60,000 
people. 

»86. — w. E. Eaton has recently retired from the 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



IX 



Stevens- Eaton Co., and has opened an office in the 
Metropolitan Building, No. 1 , Madison Ave. 

'90.— Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Mossman of West- 
minster, were in town recently and visited the college. 

Ex '91.— William H. Pond of North Attleboro 
died very suddenly at his home, March 30, of apo- 
plexy. He was apparently in good health in the 
morning, but his relatives and friends were summoned 
by telephone during the day, and at 6-30 that even- 
ing he had passed away. He leaves only his father, 
J. E. Por.d, with whom he was associated as partner 
in an extensive law practice. He was a man of con- 
siderable prominence in the town. The schools, 
stores and post-office were closed during the funeral 
ceremony. 

'97. — Clayton F. Palmer who has taught biologi- 
cal sciences in the Palo Alto High School for several 
years, has been teaching similar subjects in the State 
Normal School at Los Angeles during the past year. 
Mr. Palmer will continue with the Normal School, 
and is building a house in South Pasadena, having 
sold his home in Palo Alto. His present address is 
732 West 32nd St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



'97. — H. F. Allen is reported as being with his 
brother, J. W. Allen in Northboro. 

'99.— W. E. Hinds, Ph. D.. of Auburn. Ala., 
Professor of Entomology at Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute, reports a particularly gratifying growth in 
the entomological work at that institution as planned 
for the coming year. In connection with a complete 
revision of the agricultural portion of the curriculum, 
entomology has been made a "required subject" for 
all senior students taking any of the agricultural 
courses. The work given will include about sixty 
lectures besides laboratory and field work during the 
fall and spring terms, and will deal with the most 
important phases of general and economic entomol- 
ogy. A new agricultural building costing about 
$75,000 will be started immediately and In this, four 
commodious rooms will be set apart for the entomo- 
logical work of the college and station. 

'03. — S. C. Bacon, Assistant Engineer, Hudson 
County, New York, 515 West 135th St. 

'03. — Albert Parsons while riding a horse in Hon- 
olulu was thrown and badly Injured on the head, but It 
is understood that he Is recovering satisfactorily. 

'03. — W. E. Tottingham will receive the degree 



FOE YOUK INSPECTION. 



'■Mkfi Wrlcomt-WfornT 
Amherst House Block. 






, 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



of Master of Science from the University of Wiscon- 
sin, this Commencement. 

•03. — Born, to Mr. and Mrs. M. H. West, a son, 
Robert Curtis, at their home, June 6. Mr. West is 
Superintendent of the Lincoln Park System in Chi- 
cago and resides at 28 Linden Court. 

'04, — M. H. Blake has been developing demon- 
stration work among the farmers in different parts of 
the state, especially concerning orchards. 

'07. — Carruthers has had charge of the work in 
Agriculture in the New Jersey State Normal and 
Technical School for colored youth. His work has 
been so satisfactory, that at the recent commence- 
ment he was made principal of the School. This is 
an important position with a substantial salary, and a 
fine opportunity for developing the mechanical and 
agricultural features of education. 

Ex-'07.— E. R. Cowles returned a few days ago 
to his former home in Deerfield, after a three years 
absence in Pasadena, Cal. After leaving college he 
was forced to go west for his health which is now 
much Improved. While in California he was much 
interested in horticultural work. 



THE 

DAIRY EnPLOYHENT AGENCY 

LANSING, MICHK1AN 
FINDS POSITIONS FOR COLLEGE MEN. 



short course: men 
I place buttermakers, cheesemakers, managers, 
herdsmen, etc. 

Write for blanks and terms. 

F. O. FOSTER, Proprietor. 



Spring and Summer Woolens Now Ready at 

I. M. LABROVITZ'S 



STOR^ 

AMHERST 



TAIU)W 
II AMITY STREET, 

Imported and domestic woolens of best quality. 
Fashion, fit and first class work guaranteed. A 
large assortment on hand. Call early and get satis- 
faction. Suits with my trade mark on will be 
pressed free of charge for six months after they 
are made. Telephone 54-4. 



RaDar's 3rni, 

oi.l South Street, off Main, • NORTHAMPTON. MASS. 

Modern Improvement*, Fine Outlook. 
Beautiful Ground*), Excellent Cuisine. 

Everything New and Up to Date. 

RATES, $2.00 PER DAT. 

When in " Himp." stop with us. 



JACKSON & CUTLER, 

The Old Reliable Store is the place to buy 
Underwear, Hoisery. Gloves, Sheets, Pillow Cases, 
Blankets, Comfortables and Towels. 



GROCERY DEPARTMENT, 

Fancy Crackers, :: Confectionery and Fruit, 



THE BEST PLACE TO DINE IN THE CITY. 



R. J. RAHAR. 



It's Your Next at the 






f 




Four First Class Barbers 



Open Mondays from 
Tuesdays 
Wednesdays, 
Thursdays, 
Fridays, 
Saturdays, 



a. m. to 8 P. M. 

11 g N 

M g « 

'« 6 " 

« g H 



i> 



11 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



E. FRANK COE FERTILIZERS 

For over Fifty Years the Standard of Excellence. 

GENUINE PERUVIAN GUANO 

The Best Natural Manure. 

PERUVIAN BRAND FERTILIZERS 

Genuine Peruvian Guano Pase. 

THOMAS PHOSPHATE POWDER 

(BASIC SLAG PHOSPHATE.) 

The Cheapest and Best Source of Phosphoric Acid 

and Lime. 

NITRATE OF SODA. 95 Pure. 

POTASH SALTS. 

Our Fertilizer Literature is sent Free of Charge if you mention 
the College Signal. 



THE C0E-1RT 





a -4-26 Stone Street, 



NEW YORK. 



Athletes Attention! 



In order to obtain 
the best resultsin ath- 
letic contests, it is 
important that you 
should have the best 
implements. They 
may cost a trirle more 
but it pays. Many a 
match has been lost 
by the use of poor 
tools, so why not have 
the best Tennis 
Racket and Ball, Foot 
Ball, Basket Ball, 
RunningShoes,Skates, 
Hockey Sticks, Sweat- 
ers, Jerseys, etc. Our 
~.__^*- goods have character 

-our trademark means something. 

Send for our Catalogue. It is free to any address. 

WHIGHT «& DITSON 

344 WASHINGTON ST., BOSTON 

,8 WEST Joth ST., NEW YORK 

Chicago Providence, R- I Cambridge. Mass. 




44 



For the 



Land's Sake 



yi 



USE 



BOWKER'S 

FERTILIZERS 



They enrich the earth 
and those who till it. 






SUPPLIES. 



FISHING TACKLE BELOW COST. 



Telephone connections direct to our 

UNIVERSAL. REPAIR DEPARTMENT. 

1$. A. THOMPSON, 

Rear First National Bank. AMHERST 



Gaps and Gotons 

Makers to 06,07, 08 Classes. 



Lowest prices. Best workmanship. 
Faculty Gowns and Hoods. 

COX SONS & VINING. 

M Fourth Av*« , New You. 










THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



WOODWARD'S LUNCH, 

27 Main St., North am pton. 

Masonic IHOfk, near Uepol, Open every day. 

l.uiirhea, Confectionery, VAgH.ru Noted for Us excell.nt 

Oyster -Stew ana Clam Chowder. 

Closed only from 1 a. m. to 4 a. m. 



W. W. BOYNTON, 

MAMUFACTURBK OF 

SODA W^VTfi>KS, 

IMnaapple, Lemon and German Tonic, Birch Beer and Ginger 
Ale. F